Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Gettin There
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I'm wanting to get into canning. I am looking at the All American 921. Allamericancanner.com shows the overall height as 15 3/8". I have an over the range microwave. From the top of the iron grates to the bottom of the microwave is 16 3/4".

Does anyone that has the 921 know if that number includes the handle/gauge/etc?

My question is will that small amount of clearance affect anything, or should I get the 915 instead? The overall height of the 915 is 12 1/2" per the same website.

I would prefer the 921 over the 915

Thanks in advance.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

·
Forward, into the fray!
Joined
·
3,681 Posts
You want enough clearance to reach your jars in and out of the pot. Once full of water and full jars there's no lifting and moving that pot. Get out a tape measure and measure one at the store. Jars can't be turned sideways while still hot, even a bit, or you risk your seal.

If you find you don't have the required space consider an outside portable propane burner. I have one similar to this one https://www.amazon.com/Goplus-Outdoor-Portable-Detachable-3-Burner/dp/B07LBK17K9
 

·
Gettin There
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
You want enough clearance to reach your jars in and out of the pot. Once full of water and full jars there's no lifting and moving that pot. Get out a tape measure and measure one at the store. Jars can't be turned sideways while still hot, even a bit, or you risk your seal.

If you find you don't have the required space consider an outside portable propane burner. I have one similar to this one https://www.amazon.com/Goplus-Outdoor-Portable-Detachable-3-Burner/dp/B07LBK17K9
I appreciate the response.

The stove sticks out enough from the front of the microwave that I could get them out of the front, but not the back. I could just remove the front first and then move the jars to the front and take them out. Does that idea seem feasible?

Ive looked at every place i can think of locally and they have supplies, but not the canner. I will have to order that.

I did think about using my grill if need be.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

·
Prepaired
Joined
·
968 Posts
There’s 15 inches clearance between my stovetop and the microwave. Thats a 921 on the left and a 930 on the right, both are centered over the burner. There’s no problem getting jars out of the 921 and the handle isn’t an issue. The 930 barely fits and I have to load it, put the lid on, and carefully slide it back in position.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,777 Posts
I'm following this thread. We make jelly and water bath peaches. that is it. The pressure cooker has been sitting in the garage for over 20 years. My wife is afraid it will explode. She is also afraid to eat canned food. I was given an instapot for Xmas and we are using it so she may become less afraid of the pressure cooker. I would love to start canning the excess veggies in the garden.
 

·
Gettin There
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I appreciate all the responses folks. I think the picture and dimensions from slclarry really helped. I'm going to look around for good prices and get one. If for some reason it doesn't work I will probably just try to use my grill.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

·
I have control issues
Joined
·
5,979 Posts
I also have an over-the-range microwave, and an All-American 921. I can get it to fit , as long as I have it turned so that the gauge is in front of the microwave. So far, it's worked, if a bit inconvenient.

I have a small kitchen that must have been designed by a tall man who does not cook -or even eat at home, as there's no dining space (counters too tall, upper cupboards too high, only 3 small drawers, not enough counter space and poorly designed layout), so plan to gut the whole thing and have it re-done. When I do, the microwave will NOT be above the stove, and there will be room to get my AA on the stove with no issues.
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
17,473 Posts
I screened in part of my porch, 8' x 12' to make my canning space. Put in a ceiling fan and some florescent lighting. I still need to run a hot water line to the sink. I use a propane turkey fryer as my heat source for canning. I have a second cast iron 2 burner propane unit also.

Canning puts out a lot of heat and moisture, which is why I do the summer kitchen. Sitting under the ceiling fan, listening to the gentle rattle of the pressure weight is one of my favorite things.

I have the 7 quart model AA, my neighbor has the 14 one - I'd like to get one of those also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,416 Posts
We can using our front burner(s). We also have a microwave over the stove. We can quart jars with no problem removing the jars. Can't use the microwave while canning.

Also, can only on a natural gas or propane stove to keep heat properly regulated. We tried on an electric stove one time. We couldn't hold 10 lbs. It either ran 8 lbs or 12 lbs. Ruined canned corn, tasted like popcorn, but looked like cream corn. Don't know how people did it on wood stoves, but they were usually flat tops and you could move around the canner on the stove until the proper pressure was achieved.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,510 Posts
I started out with small canner that would hold 4 its, went to a larger one the holds 6, and then did like bunker buster says and bought a 941.

Advantages are that you can do 18 qts or 36 pts at a time, which is good because canning is a lengthy task. Great thing about the American line is that they don't use a gasket and they are built like a submarine!

Remember, canning involves fire, boiling water, and very hot jars, food, etc. It can be done safely, but you have to stay focused and keep walking your way through what you're doing next and you'll be fine. Grannies have done it for generations.

Disadvantages are size and weight. I can barely pick the thing up empty. Fortunately, you only put 3 inches of water in it to can. I never try to move it when it's loaded. Fortunately, I have a commercial grade 6 burner range, loaded as follows:

Burner 1 has the items (peas, beans, etc) to be canned, in simmering water. This is to do a slight pre-cook and to not shock the jars when the stuff is ladled in. If you run short of water during the process, just add more to this pot.

Burner 2 has a turkey cooker with simmering water to put the hot jars, lids & rings (coming out of the dishwasher) into to keep them warm until filled.

Burner 3 has the pressure cooker on it, bringing the temp up to boiling.

My wife & I set up an assembly point next to the range. this goes as follows:

1 She gets several jars, lids, and rings out of the dish washer which I then put into the hot turkey cooker water. She keeps moving jars, lids, and rings as they are needed.

2 I take a hot jar and ladle the food and hot water until they are within 1 inch of the top of the jar. My wife then wipes the lid with vinegar to remove any fat or food bits and help the seal. At this point we add salt , seasoning, etc - usually when the jar is half full.

3 I then get a lid and ring from the hot turkey cooker water, put it on the lid, and hand tighten the ring, after which I very carefully put the jar in the hot pressure cooker water.

4 We repeat until done and the canner is full. If you have more food than canning capacity, just cook it the normal way and have it for dinner.

5 After wiping down the canner sealing faces with olive oil, we seat the lid, go through the sealing process, turn up the heat until we have 2-4 "spurts" a minute from the vent and about 11 PSI pressure (we're at 125 ft ASL) using the 10 pound setting on the vent cover. We start the clock for 90 minutes and do the dishes.

6 After 90 minutes we turn off the heat and go watch a movie. DO NOT take the vent cover off! Removing the cover to make the canner cool off faster can break the jars and possibly the canner itself. Let it cool as it wants to.

7 The following is probably the most dangerous part of canning, so be careful. Be sure your tools (jar lifter) are in good shape. When the canner is at 0 PSI, carefully remove the lid. The material in the jars will still be boiling, and will continue to boil for some time after you set them out. This is why it is the critical step, as when you take them out of the canner, they are approx 250F, so you wouldn't want to drop one!

8 As they cool, you will hear the lids seal "PING". Sometimes right away, sometimes an hour or so later. We leave ours on the counter overnight and then wipe them down and remove lids and store everything away. If you have one that didn't "ping", check by pressing the center of the lid. if it "oilcans" it's not sealed. We put those in the fridge and eat them first. You can try re-canning but you have to do the full 90 minute cycle. Since we started wiping the jar mouths with vinegar, I don't remember having any "no seals".

We did 18 qts of Pintos Beans last week in a single effort - all jars sealed. The whole process took about 6 hours not counting the canner coming to pressure and cooling down. 12 lbs of dried pinto beans make approx 21 its of cooked beans.

I don't think we could do canning on a camp stove. The canner is too big and we would need 3 of them running.

Wish you luck in your canning. We've used our canned stuff during hurricanes and have given lots to our neighbors.

WW

shoot straight - stay safe
 

·
Gettin There
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Well I ordered a 921 last night. I'll hopefully have it by the end of the week. I am pretty excited about starting all this.

Once again. Thanks to everyone for the help.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

·
Forward, into the fray!
Joined
·
3,681 Posts
I actually prefer to do my canning on the outside propane burners rather than the stove/range inside. I do all the prep work inside, and cap the jars, but then take them outside to the canner. I'm rather short, and the table the burner stands on brings the top of the pot just above waist-high. It makes it easier to lift jars in and out. When done on the inside stove I have to stand on a low stool to lift those jars chin-high out of the larger pots.

It saves shoulder and arm muscles to have the pot much lower. You can choose to make a table stand for your burner to suit your needs AND keep the heat and humidity out of the kitchen. Just be sure you don't jerry-rig a shoddy stand. You DO NOT want to ever risk tipping over your burner and pressure pot. Make a sturdy, well balanced, large enough stand or table.
 

·
Ordinary Average Guy
Joined
·
970 Posts
I use my 921 outside on a propane camp stove. In my mind, if something bad happens, I won't have to clean up the kitchen.....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,631 Posts
Well I ordered a 921 last night. I'll hopefully have it by the end of the week. I am pretty excited about starting all this.

Once again. Thanks to everyone for the help.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

You will love it. I have a 921 and would have measured it for you, but I saw the thread too late.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,010 Posts
I have a Mirro-Matic canner. that has served us well for 30 yrs. The price difference between This and an American pressure canner could buy you a heck of a bunch of meat and other foods to can. The only thing I have ever replaced is the rubber seal which you do on any canner. I got it at a garage sale for $20. The outcome is the same on mine and I can a lot.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top