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Discussion Starter #1
I made extra marinara sauce so that I could pressure can half of it. As it turns out, we cooked too many raviolis (ricotta cheese and spinish raviolis). Is there a health reason why I can't add the raviolis to my sauce and can them together? I don't think the pasta will get all that soft during the canning process.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, it seems I did a bunch of don't dos so we will eat the pasta for supper tonight.



Food Fact Safety Sheet
Major Canning Sins

Charlotte P. Brennand, PhD, Extension Food Safety Specialist
FN-250.7

Potentially Deadly
What Why it is unsafe

1. Making up own canning recipe. Without scientific testing, you will not know
how long the product needs to be processed to be safe.
2. Adding extra starch, flour or other thickener to recipe.
This will change the rate of heat penetration into the product and can result in undercooking.
3. Adding extra onions, chili, bell peppers, or other vegetables to salsas.
The extra vegetable dilute the acidity and can result in botulism poisoning.
4. Using oven instead of water bath for The product will be under processed since air processing. is not as good a conductor of heat as water or
steam. The jars also may blow up.
5. Not making altitude adjustments. Since boiling temperatures are lower at
higher altitudes, the products will be undercooked.
6. Not venting pressure cooker first. Lack of venting can result in air pockets
which will not reach as high a temperature.
7. Not having gauge pressure canners tested If the gauges is inaccurate, the food may be annually. under processed.
8. Failure to acidify canned tomatoes. Not all tomatoes have an adequate acid level,especially if the vine is dead. This can result in botulism poisoning.
9. Cooling pressure canner under running water. Calculations as to cooking time includes theresidual heat during the normal cool-down period as part of the heat process. Hurrying this process will result in under processed food.
10. Letting food cool before processing in the The heat curves are based on the food being recipes that call for “hot pack.” hot at the beginning of the processing. Product could be under processed

Note: Canned meat, vegetable or salsa which was under processed can cause botulism.

Economic Loss but Hazard not Deadly
1. Use of mayonnaise jars. The jar may blow-up, especially if used in a
pressure canner, and it may be more difficult to obtain a good seal. However, if it seals, it is safe to use.
2. Use of paraffin on jams & preserves. Small air holes in the paraffin may allow mold to grow. Also paraffin can catch on fire if overheated. If have mold growth, throw out the product.
3. Cooling too slowly after removing from There a group of harmless organisms called canner. (Example: stacked jars close thermophiles which can survive canning. Iftogether.) bottles are held hot for long periods, they can produce acid. This results in the defect known as “flat-sour.” Harmless, but very undesirable flavor.
4. Storing food longer than recommended. Lengthy or overly hot storage will decrease quality and some nutrients but the product will still be safe to eat.

General Rules
1. Always exactly follow a scientifically tested recipe. (Exceptions listed below.)
2. Make altitude adjustments by adding more time to water bath canning or increasing
pressure for pressure canned products.
3. Unless you are sure that everything was perfect in the processing, boil the product for 10 minutes before eating it.

Exceptions to the rule of never change anything in a canning recipe.
Feel free to:
1. Change salt level in anything except pickles.
2. Change sugar level in syrup used for canned fruit.
3. Add extra vinegar or lemon juice.
4. Decrease any vegetable except tomatoes in salsas.
5. Substitute bell peppers, long green peppers or jalapeno peppers for each other in salsa recipes as long as do not increase the total amount.

Utah State University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution.
Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Robert L. Gilliland, Vice President and Director, Cooperative Extension Service, Utah State
University, Logan, Utah. (EP/3-95/DF)

Even though this isn't on the list, I heard you are not suppose to add oils to the recipe.
 

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I wonder if you could have just frozen it instead.
 

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One of the pluses of canning is you don't have to depend on or have electricity to store it safely
 

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One of the pluses of canning is you don't have to depend on or have electricity to store it safely
right, but she's smart for being cautious about just assuming it's safe to can everything.
 

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Almost aways better to err on the side of caution
 

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I know that I'm to late to help you out here but I will tell you that most of the time it's safe to alter anything you are canning and to figure out the time to pressure can it..is to look over the receipe and find the item that takes the longest time to can and set the timer for that. As long as it's not to dense like pureed pumpkin it will be fine.
But do what you feel is safe for your family. We have been canning for years and I've never had trouble with anything.
 

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If your pressure canning, you shouldn't have a problem. I've canned many meat\rice\noodle combinations and never had a problem. I believe most of the points listed under your canning sins quote really cautions against steam canning versus pressure canning. Botulism germinates in a anaerobic condition that is still possible with steam canning, but pressure canning will raise the temperature higher than botulism will survive. Therefore, if you pressure can, just make sure it's for an adequate time duration required to raise your material to max temp.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Before I found the notes I wrote above, I canned some potatoes with the skins on. It looks like I'll need to eat those soon too. Canning is a learning experience. I'm lucky to have this forum to help me learn.

Thanks for everyone's help.
 

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I tried canning home made chicken noodle soup once. The noodles all but disintigrated. Now I make the soup minus the pasta, then add noodles or rice when I rewarm it.
 

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I wonder if you could have just frozen it instead.
I think you should be able to, My grandfather cooks up a bunch of pasta all at once then freezes it in little one meal size portions. His sauce is also frozen this way but separate from the pasta
 

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My grandma still has ravioli that she canned from back in the 70's, I haven't eaten it, but the pasta is till in there as far as I can tell, I'll ask her what she did to preserve it if anything.
 

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When I can soup with noodles I put them in half cooked. That way they will cook the rest of the way when you can them. But most of the time I don't like noodle soup that way anyway so I use rice or barley lots of time. They hold really well and are better for you.
 
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