Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just canned 7 pints of pork shoulder and 6 pints of pinto beans. Canning part went fine but the results a day later.
1. Canned raw pack, with no liquid. Have a lot of visible fat in jars even though I tried to cut most fat off meat. Large chunks and very visible. Liquid in jar came from meat and looks OK. Question: with the amount of visible fat in jars what will be the storage life? I always thought fat will no store well, even canned. Would ham and loin can better?
2. The pinto beans are all one solid clump. Won't move when jar is tilted. Washed beans then filled with water per directions. I know they will make refried beans but also want beans for other dishes.

I would appreciate any advise you people can give as I want to can more than vegies for my storage foods. Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That fat will likely go rancid if you've got large chunks. That's why we canners remove as much as possible when canning. I would throw those jars in the freezer and use as you can.
2. How long did you process the beans and did you cook them before canning?
Pork was raw. Beans were dry pinto beans. All were processed for 75 min. per the Ball home preserve book. Also looked at Youtube videos which matched Ball book. What is best way to can pork for long term storage? Use pork loin, not much fat. Beans, should I soak them first? I want to can something besides carrots and beets.
 

·
Republic of Texas
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Pork was raw. Beans were dry pinto beans. All were processed for 75 min. per the Ball home preserve book. Also looked at Youtube videos which matched Ball book. What is best way to can pork for long term storage? Use pork loin, not much fat. Beans, should I soak them first? I want to can something besides carrots and beets.
I would think loin or ham would be best. Anything that you can trim most of the fat off of. You absolutely can do pork shoulders and roasts, but need to trim them before processing. As for the beans, pick any rocks or whatnot from them and barely rinse. Do not soak them. You can rinse them better after you've canned them and are ready to use them. Since you're canning them in water already any extra water will turn them to mush. So barely rinse and fill the jars then fill with water or broth and process like normal. They should turn out better that way.

Btw, don't toss the mushy jars you have. Even though they're mushy, they're still good. Use them to thicken soups or stews or as a base for soup beans.
 

·
Prepaired
Joined
·
992 Posts
I can pork regularly and raw pack also. I only can loin because its leaner. You will still wind up with a little fat in the jar but it doesn’t hurt anything. The longest I’ve had it on the shelf is 3 years and it was still good. Can’t answer the rancid time question, I’ve never had it go bad. I‘d just eat yours within the next few months and can loin next time.

I regularly can dry beans and you always pre soak. If you fill the jar with dry beans I don’t think you can get enough water in the jar to fully hydrate the beans. Anyway below is the process from the National Center for Home Food Preservation and it says to soak.

Procedure: Place dried beans or peas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Drain water. To quickly hydrate beans, you may cover sorted and washed beans with boiling water in a saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour and drain. Cover beans soaked by either method with fresh water and boil 30 minutes. Add ½ teaspoon of salt per pint or 1 teaspoon per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill jars with beans or peas and cooking water, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Adjust lids and process as recommended in Table 1 or Table 2 according to the method of canning used.
 

·
Republic of Texas
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
I can pork regularly and raw pack also. I only can loin because its leaner. You will still wind up with a little fat in the jar but it doesn’t hurt anything. The longest I’ve had it on the shelf is 3 years and it was still good. Can’t answer the rancid time question, I’ve never had it go bad. I‘d just eat yours within the next few months and can loin next time.

I regularly can dry beans and you always pre soak. If you fill the jar with dry beans I don’t think you can get enough water in the jar to fully hydrate the beans. Anyway below is the process from the National Center for Home Food Preservation and it says to soak.

Procedure: Place dried beans or peas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Drain water. To quickly hydrate beans, you may cover sorted and washed beans with boiling water in a saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour and drain. Cover beans soaked by either method with fresh water and boil 30 minutes. Add ½ teaspoon of salt per pint or 1 teaspoon per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill jars with beans or peas and cooking water, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Adjust lids and process as recommended in Table 1 or Table 2 according to the method of canning used.
Which is exactly how he got mushy beans. Safety in canning has zip to do with how hydrated a food is and everything to do with heat penetration.
 

·
Prepaired
Joined
·
992 Posts
Which is exactly how he got mushy beans. Safety in canning has zip to do with how hydrated a food is and everything to do with heat penetration.
He didn’t say mushy beans. Canned dry they are going to expand and form a tight clump. As far as hydration the moisture content and density has everything to do with the conduction of heat. I‘m not going to argue with you. Can any way you want but this forum has never condoned giving canning advice that is contrary to published USDA procedures.
 

·
I have control issues
Joined
·
6,036 Posts
Beans need to be cooked prior to canning them. As for the pork, you need to cut off all the visible fat prior to canning. For high-fat meats, such as ground beef, cook it first, then drain, put into a colander and "wash" the meat with hot water to rinse off as much of the fat as possible prior to canning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
We always cook pintos for an hour or so. Helps them expand so the jar can be filled to mostly full. Add beans, chili spices and the water from cooking them.
Canning time same as meats.
 

·
Republic of Texas
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
He didn’t say mushy beans. Canned dry they are going to expand and form a tight clump. As far as hydration the moisture content and density has everything to do with the conduction of heat. I‘m not going to argue with you. Can any way you want but this forum has never condoned giving canning advice that is contrary to published USDA procedures.

Then I will bow out of the conversation. Sorry to have offended your sensibilities by trying to help. He said one big lump, i.e. a mushy ball of beans that not a single person actually wants to eat.

I have been sufficiently chastised by the canning police. Feel better now?

and yes OP, Stwood is correct. No matter how you choose to process them, they are processed at the same time and weights as meat. 75 minutes for pints, 90 for quarts and PSI based on your altitude.

Have a good one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Then I will bow out of the conversation. Sorry to have offended your sensibilities by trying to help. He said one big lump, i.e. a mushy ball of beans that not a single person actually wants to eat.

I have been sufficiently chastised by the canning police. Feel better now?

and yes OP, Stwood is correct. No matter how you choose to process them, they are processed at the same time and weights as meat. 75 minutes for pints, 90 for quarts and PSI based on your altitude.

Have a good one.
The beans do not appear mushy. They are in a clump that does not move when jar is turned upside down. It appears they used all available water and stuck together. Is this normal? Do I precook them for an hour or so so they will expand and be loose in the jar? I have a bag of pintos near the end of their dry storage life before they get too hard to use and I do not want to loose them. What canning method do I use... dry with water like I did with my first batch to rehydrate when I use them or cook for an hour and then can? I really just want the best method to can dry beans. Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
I have had beans clump like that; generally I get better results if I cook the beans at least half-way done before canning. I prefer to can black beans and great northern.
Sorry I can't recall where, but recently saw a video that recommended browning the meat before canning. I have always canned the raw chunks, but this person showed that the browned meat looked more appetizing in the jar. It seems like that would also get rid of some of the fat. Anyone tried that technique?
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top