Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Maybe a silly question but here goes. I have many canned vegetables, sauces and such. I am running out of storage inside the house. If I store these items outside in the shed will they burst from temperatures below freezing but above 0 degrees? Im talking about metal cans by the way not jars. Thanks
 

·
Angry ol' coot
Joined
·
3,912 Posts
There has been many threads about this, so just a quick review. Store them under beds, put flats in the bottom or top of closets then put your shoes or clothes on top of them. Store them in end tables, etc. Get creative.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
Personally I don't trust canned food past the 1-2 year shelf life. They have specialty racks for canned food that allow you to rotate them out by putting new canned food in the back and the new rolls to the front. Are you rotating your stock? Do you have more than you can rotate on a regular basis? If so, I'd recommend starting to store non-canned food items that will last virtually forever such as salt, sugar, honey, wheat, and rice.

Yes cans will explode with freezing temps and if they heat up the shelf life will drastically decrease, probably only lasting months. Some people risk eating old canned food but I've heard too many horror stories.
 

·
Tough Chick
Joined
·
2,981 Posts
Look into the can rotation systems made and sold by Shelf Reliance. There are a lot of choices for just about any space you need to fill. They will help you with organization, rotation, and save space.

I also don't trust canned goods, especially ones high in acid content like tomatoes, past the expiration date. The BPA that leaches into the food is not worth the risk, in my opinion. Once you have several months' of canned food stored, I think it is time to start with the truly long term food stores such as freeze dried food in #10 cans, as well as other long term foods as mentioned above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,448 Posts
I agree. I look at canned food as only short term. If the grid goes down in the winter in my part of the world, I will have enough to worry about without trying to keep my food from freezing. Yup, freezing will split your cans. Dried food won't freeze, but it dosen't keep for long. I've been drying a lot of tomatoes for several years now and it is getting to the place where I am going to have to throw some of the oldest stuff out.

The best for the long run is grains. Rice is about the cheapist food in the store right now. Everybody ought to have a couple 40# bags stashed somewhere. That you can keep out in the shed, and the only thing you have to worry about is keeping it as cool as possible and keeping the mice off it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,376 Posts
High temps kill your food of any kind. Canned foods room temp or lower to maximize life of can. Like MRE only lasts 30 days when stored in 100 degree temp. You can still eat them but all nutritional value is GONE. That is directly from manufacturers of MREs and US Military. Never store food in a shed or garage unless the temp inside is no higher than 70 degrees or no less than 40 degrees.
 

·
Totally off grid
Joined
·
2,882 Posts
We have canned goods in our root cellar that are over 10 years past date and they are still perfect to eat. Low temps and low humidity are best. DO NOT store below 32*.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
I usually store mainly rice and wheat. You can cook red hard wheat for a couple hours and make 'wheat berries' which is basically just boiled wheat. If you haven't tried it I suggest getting some and giving it a go, it's delicious topped with pepper and some canned meat such as canned ham or chicken, and it's really really cheap. You can eat for about five cents a meal for the wheat. And if you store it vacuum sealed with an oxygen absorber it will last for a thousand years. They say there was wheat in the Egyptian pyramids that still sprouted after they discovered it a thousand years later. Your great grand kids can safely make fresh bread from your storage of wheat.

I've read many posts that say their canned goods exploded shortly after the expiration date and not from freezing. This is very dangerous. They can contain Botulism which is so dangerous that if it splashes on your skin it can kill you by absorption through your skin. YIKES However, there are quite a few people who have huge stores of nearly 100% canned food and will argue that it's perfectly safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
water proof plastic containers below 36 inches in the ground will keep a long time. You can put your can goods in that. it's about 54 Degrees or so. Just can't be in a wet area. We have a good spot and they do fine there. the old root celler concept I guess.
 

·
Super Gassy Moderator
Joined
·
66,639 Posts
Freezing temperatures can cause the can to bulge, compromising the seam. This lets bacteria in and causes spoilage. Worst case is that it might not be visible and the food might seem fine, yet be toxic. If a can ever freezes, either use it immediately or toss it out.

Otherwise, stored in moderate temperatures, canned goods are safe to eat many years past the "best by" date on the can. Del Monte, Hormel and several other canneries are on records as saying that as long as the can remains sealed, it is safe to eat indefinately. This is also backed up by the USDA or FDA (forgot which). The food might not taste all that good, and over time nutrition can be reduced, but at least it's safe to eat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
anything with tomatoes will not stay good much past the BB date. also canned pineapple and canned mandarin oranges seem to be the first to burst open if left uneaten for too long. I just opened up 2 jars of spaghetti sauce that were one yr over the best before date, and they were both bad. color and taste were off as well as smell. I didnt eat them. I also opened up a 3 yr old can of tomatoes and noticed the color, and the consistency were not normal, I did eat a few bites of it before realising it wasnt good. and I didnt get sick. but it was OFF and I do not trust anything any more that has tomatoes in it. I am watching my BB dates on them very carefully from now on.
rotate your canned foods. if there is no BB date on the can, I write on it the date I bought it.
 

·
Super Gassy Moderator
Joined
·
66,639 Posts
anything with tomatoes will not stay good much past the BB date. also canned pineapple and canned mandarin oranges seem to be the first to burst open if left uneaten for too long. I just opened up 2 jars of spaghetti sauce that were one yr over the best before date, and they were both bad. color and taste were off as well as smell. I didnt eat them. I also opened up a 3 yr old can of tomatoes and noticed the color, and the consistency were not normal, I did eat a few bites of it before realising it wasnt good. and I didnt get sick. but it was OFF and I do not trust anything any more that has tomatoes in it. I am watching my BB dates on them very carefully from now on.
rotate your canned foods. if there is no BB date on the can, I write on it the date I bought it.
Acidy foods don't last as well. They can react with the coating in the can and taste nasty. And if they can get to the metal of the can, they can eventually cause it to corrode.

This is why I store tomato powder instead of tomato sauce and paste. Tomato products in glass jars last a bit longer. But acidy foods need to be on a shorter rotation than other canned goods, just to keep them fresh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
Even though I do keep mainly dry food I do keep about one large tote full of canned foods. I don't really rotate per se but I just buy two or three more cans of tuna, ham, sardines, beans, ect. just to have on hand. When I get the munchies I'll dig out a can or two. I also keep pickles too which would probably last a long time, perhaps longer than other canned goods. I try to plan my canned foods mainly as toppings to other dried food dishes, such as on top of rice, beans, or wheat berries.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top