Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Perception is NOT reality
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In thinking about things that my vehicle needs to run, I started wondering where I would get antifreeze in any kind of long-term breakdown. So I'm wondering if antifreeze is something that can be stocked up and stored long term. If so, how long and are there any special considerations or stabilizing agents needed?

I did a search and didn't find anything related to this, so I thought I would ask.
 

·
Here's my safety Sir
Joined
·
14,678 Posts
"It's been asked many times, so we went to the radiator coolant experts at Prestone to find out the shelf life of a bottle of coolant. It turns out your radiator isn't too picky how old the coolant is, because a gallon of the stuff is good for years. Even if the bottle of radiator coolant has been opened, it's good for years."

http://autorepair.about.com/od/quicktips/qt/coolant_life.htm
 

·
Homesteader
Joined
·
2,576 Posts
I father who raised a family during the 1930's Depression, said most people could not afford anti-freeze. He said they used Kerosene, and did not put the pressure cap on tight, so pressure did not build up. And if you didn't have Kerosene, to use water mixed with alcohol, and make sure the radiator was covered in, with the water alcohol mix. He said shortly after you shut the engine off, that you always had to remember to drain the radiator and engine block or you would burst the rad or engine block. Then refill with the liquid next time you took the car out. Just some more useless info for you....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
The antifreeze will last, the containers will not. I have 3 cases of antifreeze that are a little past 10 years old, and the jugs are starting to split and leak. I am currently looking for options for containers to transfer to. Metal is not an option, as the corrosion inhibitors will immediately start reacting with the container and will be depleted in about 2 years. I am currently looking for more info on the glycerine-based arctic coolant that the military uses. According to the manuals, once installed, it never has to be changed again, even if the vehicle is returned to a warm environment.

Alcohol and kerosene were fine in the 30's with 140 and 160 degree thermostats and low pressure cooling systems. Modern cooling systems will raise the temperature of the coolant above the boiling point of the liquids, since most use 195 degree thermostats. If you blow a hose, you will suddenly have a cloud of flammable vapor loose under your hood, with way too many ignition sources around. I learned the hard way about 30 years ago that heated kerosene vapor ignites almost as well as gasoline.

There is a military TM available online, Battlefield Damage Assessment And Repair. It lists coolant substitutes for use in emergencies, with notes about strengths and weaknesses. It also has a great deal of info about field expedient repairs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Many years ago, I owned a business that used an old 1 ton truck to haul water. During the off season, the truck set, and one winter someone stole the radiator.
Across the way, there was an old junkyard, owned by a friend, who just collected old interesting cars,trucks,heavy equipment. Very seldom would he sell, just collected.
Anyway, I approached him about buying one of the radiators out of an old truck. He said that'd be fine but to be sure and save the antifreeze. Now this truck was about 20-25 years old at the time, and the antifreeze was still green, and had been doing it's job, the whole time, sitting there with the truck up on blocks.:thumb:
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top