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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking about a small green house set up around some tires with potatoes planted in them. Anybody tried this? I live in rural Tennessee where you sometimes get 65 degree days in the winter as well as single digit nights occasionally.
 

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Hunter/Farmer
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You could have probably planted them mid to late summer there, but potato plants are killed by heavy frosts.
 

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Potato's will keep growing until the soil temp gets down and holds at 43-45 * F.
........................................Alaskan....
 

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I've got a bad feeling...
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By saying you'll have a greenhouse, I assume you'll have a somewhat hospitable environment during the winter, temperature wise.

If so, I think it's possible.

I've grown potatoes in tires before & it works beautifully. Take a tire & fill it full of straw. Add your seed potatoes. No need to "plant" them in the ground, just put them in the straw & cover with straw. Once they start to sprout & grow, add another tire & more straw. Keep doing that until you're up to about 5 or 6 tires in height.

Once the potatoes emerge from the last tire & look ready to harvest, just start removing tires.. one at a time. You'll have more potatoes then you can shake a stick at! Just pick them out of the straw.
 

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We live in Southern Wisconsin and grow potatoes all year long. Now we do it in the green house but we use to grow them on our basment. It's really easy.

Take at least a 30 gallon garbage can and drill some holes in the bottom of it. Fill it 1/3 of the way up with dirt and then put your seed potato slices on it. Then cover the seed potatoes with about an inch of dirt over the top of them. If you want to plant more than one kind of potato use a different garbage can for each kind. In our basement we used a $10.00 Walmart plant light over each garbage can, had them on timers for 12-14 hours a day. Then when the sprouts get to be about 6 inches high, cover them halfway with dirt. Continue to do that until the grow over the top of the garbage can, then mound straw over them and stop watering them. When the tops turn yellow, put a tarp next to the garbage can to catch the dirt and dump it over. Collect your potatoes and put the dirt somewhere where you will not grow tomatoes or potatoes with it for at least two years. Bleach the garbage can and leave it out in the sun for a month or so and it's ready to be used again. We have a system set up where we plant potatoes every 2 to 3 months this way. It's so easy.

If you are growing them in your green house make certain it stays well above freezing in there because potatoes don't tolerate frost. If they do die back though make certain you harvest the potatoes that did grow. They will be baby potatoes and won't last long in storage but they can be eaten right away.
 

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Curious Cat
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I’m sure you could grow them in a green house but I wouldn’t bother and I’ll tell you why. Potatoes are one of the best keeping veggies you can grow. You can grow a nice crop in the summer and they will keep for you to eat all winter and into spring. The best way to keep them is in some kind of root cellar but there are lots of makeshift root cellars (buried trash can) that you can jerry-rig.

I would use my primo greenhouse space in winter to grow veggies that don’t keep well like fresh salad greens, cucumbers, & tomatoes.
VW
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Wow, lots of good info here, thanks Guys and Gals.

Mac, I live near Bradyville between Nashville and Chattanooga. I went to school in Goodlettsville and Madison and lived in Old Hickory for ever.
 

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Renegade Vegan
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I’m sure you could grow them in a green house but I wouldn’t bother and I’ll tell you why. Potatoes are one of the best keeping veggies you can grow. You can grow a nice crop in the summer and they will keep for you to eat all winter and into spring. The best way to keep them is in some kind of root cellar but there are lots of makeshift root cellars (buried trash can) that you can jerry-rig.

I would use my primo greenhouse space in winter to grow veggies that don’t keep well like fresh salad greens, cucumbers, & tomatoes.
VW
You took the words right out of my mouth!:thumb:
 

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Master Mason
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By saying you'll have a greenhouse, I assume you'll have a somewhat hospitable environment during the winter, temperature wise.

If so, I think it's possible.

I've grown potatoes in tires before & it works beautifully. Take a tire & fill it full of straw. Add your seed potatoes. No need to "plant" them in the ground, just put them in the straw & cover with straw. Once they start to sprout & grow, add another tire & more straw. Keep doing that until you're up to about 5 or 6 tires in height.

Once the potatoes emerge from the last tire & look ready to harvest, just start removing tires.. one at a time. You'll have more potatoes then you can shake a stick at! Just pick them out of the straw.
I was just going to suggest this! Works great.
 

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Here is a previous post with an idea that worked for me:

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=161258

Basically, you build up the box with 2x6 boards. You harvest the potatoes by removing the bottom board and then the next lowest board, etc.

To grow them in the winter, I have wrapped BLACK plastic around the base and this helps keep the temperature up on the soil. On really frigid nights, I simply lay a thick plastic sheet over the top (I left my four 4x4 posts a little taller so that I could do this easily and capture some air under the sheet.

This is a wonderful way to grow potatoes in my opinion.

If you want to see a LOT of other threads on this subject on this Board, go to Google and type in the following - - - it will show you MANY previous threads on this subject with some great info.

site:survivalistboards.com potato box gardening
 

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I grow most of my potatoes (the kinds you don't find in store, the rest I get from my son-in-law, they have a huge potato farm). I save some for seed and eat the rest and they always make it into planting time the next year. I keep them in my basement, in the area farthest from my furnace and the coolest in the basement. But I will be trying Winter Wren method since my basement is already set up for starting seedling. I'm trying to over winter some sweet potato plants for next year's planting. They don't like it but they are still alive. That's a plant that is not meant for Minnesota but I don't care.:D: I also have limes growing upstairs, the coffee trees still haven't started producing but they look fine.
 

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Be Prepared
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Potatoes store well, in the root cellar. I say grow the potatoes in the summer and then use your greenhouse to grow greens that don't store well in the root cellar.
 
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