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Merely a free thinker
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I plan on going camping this May with 3 others to practice some wilderness survival, but I'm not sure how much im going to need. A little background....I am 18 and have gone camping with a friend once before. I plan on going to a stat park with facilities for bathrooms and showers. I plan on going for 9 days and brining my car.

I was planning on cooking food over a fire (mostly canned food). I also plan on using the fire at night to help keep warm. With this much use of the fire, i dont know how much firewood i will need to bring.

I have not yet selected a tent or sleeping bag, but am considering the ozark trail backpacking ones at walmart. I am open to suggestions though.

Items i plan on brining include: Leatherman tool, swiss army knife, winchester bowie knife, tent, sleeping bag, sleeping mat, magnesium fire starter, matches, ligher, metal grill for fire pit, mess kit (pots/pans/silverware), dish soap, medical kit(standard stuff, gauze, bandaids, medication...etc), personal health items(deoderant, toothbrush, tooshpaster, etc). Canteens, water containers, water purification system, firewood, several food items(canned, other non-perishable), clothes, bow & arrow, archey target, flashlight, radio, and bateries.

Im not sure if i am missing anything important, in a real survival senario i would bring my mosin-nagant, but not to this camping trip. I will apreciate and thank you in advanced for any advise you guys have.
 

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One thing I do know is that you will find out excatly what your needing but missed when you wind up needing it.
Take extra para cord or rope.
Tin foil for making baked potatoes in the coals.
Rain gear or large plastic bags that can be modified into rain ponchos. Wide brimed hat that will keep the rain from running down your neck.
Bandanas rather than face cloths or towels because they dry really fast and are much lighter, and yes you can dry off using one because they are supprisingly absorbant and they wring out really well. They also can be wetted down and wraped around your head if it's hot to help cool you down.
 

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Tarp. Multiple of them. If rain is in forecast or unexpected rain is expected in the area (sounds funny, doesn't it?), you'll be REALLY glad you have some. If your camp site allows you to park your vehicle right there, setting a large tarp to the vehicle provides very good cover.

When you are camping, it's hard not to make the fire large...relatively speaking. (no sense of conserving or being discrete) It's impossible to bring firewood for 9 days...unless you're towing a trailer filled w/ firewood...or truck bed full. Plan to collect/buy some at the park, and plan to be splitting the wood. So, at minimum...hand axe will be handy.

I bought a coleman 3-person tent from a local sporting goods store back in...2001 for my self and the wife. We still use it. For car camping purpose, coleman along with other makers has some inexpensive good tent choices. Since you're car camping, I'd suggest having a a bit larger size tent as its weight is not an issue. For 2 of us, the space that the 3-person tent provides was perfect. 2 of us to stretch our legs all the way, and little space left for our bags/equipment. If you buy 2-person tent because you only have yourself and your partner, that's likely to leave no (or not much) space for anything you want to have in the tent.

Air mattress is great for car camping (don't forget the repair kit). self-inflating, closed-cell types for space & weight saving for backpacking as space & weight are important.

Sleeping bag....I'd really buy something that you can use for general purpose...the kind that could be used for both spring & fall...in terms of temp. range. You will find yourself buying more sleeping bags later on as your need becomes more specific. You just won't be done with having only 1 sleeping bag.

Don't forget a flannel blanket. You can use it to sleep with if it's too cold and sleeping bag is not enough, or put it underneath if the ground feels too hard/bumpy....etc.

Some firestarter log. (You might feel like cheating, but...) If it pours, and you want to restart the fire, having even a small piece of the starter log will make the job so much easier.

Entertainment items...such as playing cards, and....Umm...whatever else you can think of. Probably something that requires no batteries.

And...I'll think of something a bit more later...
 

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9 days? Most state and Fed Parks do not allow long term camping. State and Fed parks are poor choice for survivial "training". In most cases you can't cut down trees, set snares ect. What do you plan to do during those 9 days? Many parks that allow fires also sell firewood. I'd call the park and ask(though it would be cheaper to bring yur own or buy it outside the park) Have fun and good luck.
 

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I agree with what seawind says.. I do a 14 day backcountry trip solo every year here in Montana.. I bring only what i can carry on my back.. I plan my trip around lakes and rivers so I have good fishing areas to stock up on fish. I would stay away from tents in walmart, If you have a good down pour your gonna pay the price by sleeping in a puddle of water all night which isnt fun trust me. sleeping bag should always be rated to about 20 degrees less than the temps your camping in just to be safe. again walmart cheapys will leave you freezing at night unless you double up... As for fire wood its hard to say what your needs will be.. When im out in the woods I collect until i think I have enough then double that amount LOL cause im never right.. The main thing ive learned over the years is to pack my own food in baggies. The store bought stuff always leaves me wanting more. think and plan for 4000 plus cals a day if you are on the go and working hard.. Have fun and stay safe..
 

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I plan on going camping this May with 3 others to practice some wilderness survival, but I'm not sure how much im going to need. A little background....I am 18 and have gone camping with a friend once before. I plan on going to a stat park with facilities for bathrooms and showers. I plan on going for 9 days and brining my car.

I was planning on cooking food over a fire (mostly canned food). I also plan on using the fire at night to help keep warm. With this much use of the fire, i dont know how much firewood i will need to bring.

I have not yet selected a tent or sleeping bag, but am considering the ozark trail backpacking ones at walmart. I am open to suggestions though.

Items i plan on brining include: Leatherman tool, swiss army knife, winchester bowie knife, tent, sleeping bag, sleeping mat, magnesium fire starter, matches, ligher, metal grill for fire pit, mess kit (pots/pans/silverware), dish soap, medical kit(standard stuff, gauze, bandaids, medication...etc), personal health items(deoderant, toothbrush, tooshpaster, etc). Canteens, water containers, water purification system, firewood, several food items(canned, other non-perishable), clothes, bow & arrow, archey target, flashlight, radio, and bateries.

Im not sure if i am missing anything important, in a real survival senario i would bring my mosin-nagant, but not to this camping trip. I will apreciate and thank you in advanced for any advise you guys have.
Well this is called car camping, and likely not what you have in mind. However, great way to start into the outdoors and as a backpacker. Your gear is fine for car camping, though I'd leave behind the bowie knife. I'd replace the magnesium fire starter block (a piece of crap IMO) and pick up a Ferrion Rod (can find them nowdays for 4-5 dollars at most cheap outdoors places like ****s or Dunhams).

A sleeping bag from Walmart will be fine for a car camping trip, though if you ever plan on going backpacking deeper into the woods. I wouldn't bother with it, and spend the money to pick up an actual backpacking bag. Warning they can be expensive ranging from 80 dollars to around 400 depending on type, brand, and weight.

As for firewood, state parks (least most anyhow) will not allow you to bring in firewood from outside. YOu must purchase firewood from one of their accepted distributers on site (usually around 5-10 dollars for a bundle) and you are usually forbidden from using wood found in the park (trust me not worth getting caught. I have a 185 dollar fine once because I got lossed on a trail and set up camp for the night to hike back out in the morning. I got out fine only to find a ranger giving me a ticket for being the park without an overnight permit).

As for your gear, I cannot tell you what to take and what not too. This is a personal choice, and everyone has their opnion on what to take and not to. Made your own choices, if that magnesium block works for you then use it. But what I do suggest is take a list of everything you brought. And as your time goes on make notes of your thoughts on each piece of gear, how much did you use it, do you feel the weight is worth bringing. Is there something else that would do the same thing (Example: I removed leather gloves from my kit ages ago because I found that my buff scarf, a sock, or my leatherman worked just as good for pulling hot objects from the fire / stove)

For food, canned food is fine car camping as you can store it without problem inside the car (easy to carry the weight of canned food). But over time you'll want to look into lighter weight foods (dehydrated snacks, meals, etc) if you wanna get into backpacking.

All in all sounds like you have a fun trip ahead of ya. Just use your head, and don't get into anything you cannot get out of. Look up the state parks laws, and follow them! While they might seem like B.S. they're there for a reason. Get comfortable with hiking, camping, and figuring out some survival skills that you can learn and practice at the state parks, then when you feel ready you can move on to the national forests or public land where you don't have quiet as many rules.

Oh and don't forget. CAMERA and photos!!!!

EDIT NOTE: TDF is also right. Leave behind the bow. Hunting and weapons are usually not allowed in State Parks unless you have proper permits, or the park has an actually archery range (like some BSA locals). Again check in with the state park on their rules and regulations.
 

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Lots of links for you to check out to see examples of camping gear for general purpose camping and hiking. While I don't have all of this exact stuff, my gear is remarkably similar and I do have experience with many of the products mentioned.

OMG you will have to bring in a TON of weight with crap like canned food. Plan, make, and dehydrate your meals prior to going. I suggest not using a "campfire" to cook- probably one of the least efficient methods I can think of. Get something like the Kelly Kettle or a homemade alcohol stove in order to lessen lost time spent searching for firewood in a state park, which you may find to be almost impossible when you don't even plan on leaving the parking lot. Do NOT get Ozark Trail crap. At least get a decent pack like the Osprey Aether 70 or something from GoLite like the Quest 65. Bow and arrows are probably illegal to take into a state park like you are thinking. Get a sleeping bag that will compact down well and not weigh a ton- think along the lines of a MH Phantom 32 or MH UltraLamina +15, maybe a WM UltraLite. SnugPak has some military-type more durable alternatives that are nice. I recommend a NeoAir, NEMO Astro, or BA Insulate Air Core for a pad to sleep on. You only need one knife, preferable a fixed blade with between 3" and 6" blade. Anything else is kinda... excessive. I like the ESEE-4 knives. A multi-tool can be handy to have around. Don't bring cotton clothes for obvious reasons. I've got a set of GoreTex ProShell top and bottoms for rain gear, and it has served me well. For cooking you really just need a pot or container to boil water in, and one mug for each person to eat/drink out of, and one spoon of your choosing is plenty utensil for camping. For water storage, collapsible bottles work well because they don't take up room when not in use. Any of the hand-pump water filters (not purifiers) will be good for your use. The MSR SweetWater is a pretty standard filter. For a flashlight, something small like the NiteCore IFE1 or Photon Micro II will work fine depending what you need it for. Usually the Photon in red color is good for most things. I wouldn't bring dish soap, either. It's bad to put into the water system and is harmful to the stuff living there. Get some Camp Suds and use sparingly, or if you have an alcohol stove, clean out your pots with a paper towel and a splash of the alcohol once you rinse it out and eat all the yummy stuff you couldn't scrape out. The alcohol soaked paper towel with food on it will burn wonderfully and doesn't leave any trash for you to haul out. Layer your clothing correctly with many light layers of synthetic or wool (synthetic is easier to care for), and always have a light wind shell to keep the wind at bay.
 

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Lots of links for you to check out to see examples of camping gear for general purpose camping and hiking. While I don't have all of this exact stuff, my gear is remarkably similar and I do have experience with many of the products mentioned.

OMG you will have to bring in a TON of weight with crap like canned food. Plan, make, and dehydrate your meals prior to going. I suggest not using a "campfire" to cook- probably one of the least efficient methods I can think of. Get something like the Kelly Kettle or a homemade alcohol stove in order to lessen lost time spent searching for firewood in a state park, which you may find to be almost impossible when you don't even plan on leaving the parking lot. Do NOT get Ozark Trail crap. At least get a decent pack like the Osprey Aether 70 or something from GoLite like the Quest 65. Bow and arrows are probably illegal to take into a state park like you are thinking. Get a sleeping bag that will compact down well and not weigh a ton- think along the lines of a MH Phantom 32 or MH UltraLamina +15, maybe a WM UltraLite. SnugPak has some military-type more durable alternatives that are nice. I recommend a NeoAir, NEMO Astro, or BA Insulate Air Core for a pad to sleep on. You only need one knife, preferable a fixed blade with between 3" and 6" blade. Anything else is kinda... excessive. I like the ESEE-4 knives. A multi-tool can be handy to have around. Don't bring cotton clothes for obvious reasons. I've got a set of GoreTex ProShell top and bottoms for rain gear, and it has served me well. For cooking you really just need a pot or container to boil water in, and one mug for each person to eat/drink out of, and one spoon of your choosing is plenty utensil for camping. For water storage, collapsible bottles work well because they don't take up room when not in use. Any of the hand-pump water filters (not purifiers) will be good for your use. The MSR SweetWater is a pretty standard filter. For a flashlight, something small like the NiteCore IFE1 or Photon Micro II will work fine depending what you need it for. Usually the Photon in red color is good for most things. I wouldn't bring dish soap, either. It's bad to put into the water system and is harmful to the stuff living there. Get some Camp Suds and use sparingly, or if you have an alcohol stove, clean out your pots with a paper towel and a splash of the alcohol once you rinse it out and eat all the yummy stuff you couldn't scrape out. The alcohol soaked paper towel with food on it will burn wonderfully and doesn't leave any trash for you to haul out. Layer your clothing correctly with many light layers of synthetic or wool (synthetic is easier to care for), and always have a light wind shell to keep the wind at bay.
While i agree this is great stuff (Especially the esse and such) don't forget this guy is just starting out. To get a good kit of high grade, leight weight items, can easily cost upwards or more then 1,000 dollars. (Note: I love my OSprey Atmos 65 :) great pack and worth every dime).

As he'll just be car camping let him start with the cheaper stuff, learn the lessons and over time build up to the better grade material. Never know he might not even enjoy camping and would suck to have spent all the money for the good stuff. Course if he wasn't car camping in a state park, and was instead say...going to go backpack the AT then I would Totally agree with tossing out just about everything he's bringing to replace :)
 

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Todd, just an example note. Take from it what ya will. When I go car camping I have a small storage tub in my closet. Inside is your basic heavier weight gear for car camping. I toss that into my car to take with me, I also have my daypack. A 30 L pack that has my 10 essentials for day hiking. That's enough to cover me at the state camp site, and for me to enjoy a long distance dayhike in safety. I myself no longer use a tent when I car camp (though I do own a grea Marmot Limelite 2 tent for backpacking) I own a station wagon so I just plop my pad and bag out in the back of the wagon and go to sleep. I've yet to worry about condensation or water leaking in :)
 

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I'm taking my little cousin and some of my friends on a survival trek during spring break. We're going with just knives to be as realistic as possible.
 

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As others noted, you're car camping. And as a camping newbie who is eager to learn, you're off to a good start. That length of time, you'll have a REAL good feel for what you need but don't have, and what you thought you needed but can afford to shed.

Lots of good advice above, but there's one glaring omission - DUCT TAPE! When you need it, it's tough to substitute.
 

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In addition to what others have said (and I probably missed some and I'm repeating):
You are car camping, so weight/space isn't nearly the issue it would be if backpacking, so...

Bring a stove. Propane, alcohol, whatever. You probably don't want to be in camp for 9 days straight, meaning you will probably only have a fire at night or maybe a small one in the mornings. You are probably going to want coffee and a hot breakfast in the mornings and honestly warming up a pot of canned food for dinner is much easier over a small stove.

Hammock. You're young so maybe not a big deal, but for someone over 40 like me there is no better way to relax at camp than a hammock. You may even want to look into a hammock tent instead of a ground tent.

Camp Axe and/or folding saw - 9 days means you are almost for sure going to need to scavenge wood.

Back pack. I know it's a car camping trip, but if you plan any long day hikes you are going to want to bring a pack full of stuff even if it's just basics like a knife, emergency fire starting, first aid kit, warm coat, water and lunch.
 

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Id be flexeble on the 9 day plan. Its a good idea to plan your first camping trip within a short drive from Walmart. You will realize things you need and can make a trip there to reconfigure. It will takes going to be knowing usually.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I was looking at a 9x7' Model of the Ozark trail backpacking tent, i am 6' even. The place i plan on going to is Hammonaset Beach State Park. And the have a camp store site with some basics if i forget something. I appreciate all your suggestions guys. Thanks. Even though i'm car camping, i do plan on going on some short packpacking trips while im there.
 

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9 days is a long trip, and alot of Americans with dayjobs barely earn that much vacation time in a year it seems. Since this is one of your first trips, have you considered a shorter time? You'll know by day 3 or so what you forgot.

At our state parks, fire works a little differently. The state park itself sells firewood, there are also almost always private people selling firewood from their yards outside the park. And you can usually forage in the park itself to a certain extent. As for keeping warm, they require the fires to remain in designated fire pits, and you really don't want to build a tent that close to one. Last, it is standard etiquette to completely put out the fire before you go to bed anyway.

I plan on going camping this May with 3 others to practice some wilderness survival, but I'm not sure how much im going to need. A little background....I am 18 and have gone camping with a friend once before. I plan on going to a stat park with facilities for bathrooms and showers. I plan on going for 9 days and brining my car.

I was planning on cooking food over a fire (mostly canned food). I also plan on using the fire at night to help keep warm. With this much use of the fire, i dont know how much firewood i will need to bring.

I have not yet selected a tent or sleeping bag, but am considering the ozark trail backpacking ones at walmart. I am open to suggestions though.

Items i plan on brining include: Leatherman tool, swiss army knife, winchester bowie knife, tent, sleeping bag, sleeping mat, magnesium fire starter, matches, ligher, metal grill for fire pit, mess kit (pots/pans/silverware), dish soap, medical kit(standard stuff, gauze, bandaids, medication...etc), personal health items(deoderant, toothbrush, tooshpaster, etc). Canteens, water containers, water purification system, firewood, several food items(canned, other non-perishable), clothes, bow & arrow, archey target, flashlight, radio, and bateries.

Im not sure if i am missing anything important, in a real survival senario i would bring my mosin-nagant, but not to this camping trip. I will apreciate and thank you in advanced for any advise you guys have.
 
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