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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This week I was able to score over 600 2x4x8 rough grade pine boards, they were screwed to the walls of a large clothing store then they had metal shelf support brackets screwed to them to hold clothing and stuff. Each board was screwed every 4 ft with 2 big deck screws then the shelf support brackets were held on with drywall screws so every board has at least 10 holes in it. And the boards have a clear varnish on 1 side.
My plan is to turn some of them into craftsman style doors and window trim around the 19 doors and 16 windows in my house. The plan is to run the boards through my planner and take a hair off each side to remove the varnish and clean them up.
Question is, do I fill the screw holes before or after planning them? What is the best wood filler to use? I figure I would clean them up, fill the holes, then spray them with primer and at least 2 coats of paint before I start building them into trim it would save some time and mess in the house.
 

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Just caulk it... your plans are to paint them anyway so no reason to try to blend in the integrity of the grain.
Nice score BTW...if your plans were to stain them that's a different story.
As Charlie mentioned check for any metals before planing, besides that it doesn't matter whether you fill holes before or after the planing,might save you a step of sanding afterwards to fill in first though.
 

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600 boards! That would cost a few nickels these days.

I've been making cabinets for over 40 years. I agree with the comments from both members.

I do like using 2-part epoxy fillers. These formulas harden quickly and are easy to plane.

If you are going to paint the boards, technically it does not matter whether you use the wood filler before or after planing, but it will save you time and skip the extra sanding if you do it before. The planer will take the filler patch down flush with the surface. You probably do not need 2 coats of paint prior to cutting and assembly. You will likely have to apply an additional coat after assembly.

If you had planned to stain the boards, it would depend on the size of the holes. Some cabinetmakers like to stain, poly-coat, and then fill small holes with color-match putty. For larger holes, you would use the filler first, but make sure you are using a filler that will take a stain. Sometimes, you may have to touch up the holes with additional stain on a small brush.

Have fun with your project.
 

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This week I was able to score over 600 2x4x8 rough grade pine boards, they were screwed to the walls of a large clothing store then they had metal shelf support brackets screwed to them to hold clothing and stuff. Each board was screwed every 4 ft with 2 big deck screws then the shelf support brackets were held on with drywall screws so every board has at least 10 holes in it. And the boards have a clear varnish on 1 side.
My plan is to turn some of them into craftsman style doors and window trim around the 19 doors and 16 windows in my house. The plan is to run the boards through my planner and take a hair off each side to remove the varnish and clean them up.
Question is, do I fill the screw holes before or after planning them? What is the best wood filler to use? I figure I would clean them up, fill the holes, then spray them with primer and at least 2 coats of paint before I start building them into trim it would save some time and mess in the house.
The varnish will destroy the edge on your planer knives. It will roll the entire edge of your knife .If you are set on planing them no big deal you will have to sharpen or replace them several times. Putty after planing them . It will be difficult to push putty down in the screw holes deep enough to keep the planer knives from "pulling " some of it out . Putty after planing and then sand to your spec. Be safe
 

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there is some standard size of a hole that can exist and not cause any structural issues. forget what it is, but probably you're just looking at a cosmetic issue if you don't like the holes.
 

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The varnish will destroy the edge on your planer knives. It will roll the entire edge of your knife .If you are set on planing them no big deal you will have to sharpen or replace them several times. Putty after planing them . It will be difficult to push putty down in the screw holes deep enough to keep the planer knives from "pulling " some of it out . Putty after planing and then sand to your spec. Be safe
I'm in this camp , also epoxy is rough on blades wouldn't use it in this case just wood putty.
I just resharpened 2 hand planes this morning that I've had to run across epoxied joints and filled sunken screws ,
fairing in a boat.
It dulls them out

Not going to dress the edges on a jointer?
 

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The two options that come to mind are 1) a plug (similar to a dowel only the grain goes the other way, like the wood it would be patching, or 2) a dutchman, which is just a patch of a different shape. There are some cool tools out that let you do either of those quite easily. I'm thinking you could actually use the same wood you're planing to make the plugs/patches and could probably make them nearly invisible if you wanted to. Or not. Sometimes people like the contrast of using a different colored plug/patch.

I would think if I were going to plane the boards, I'd do that before dealing with the holes. But that's just how I would do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They used deck screws to fasten the boards to the walls so there is a hole from the screw and an indention from the head, so it's a sizable hole plus some chipping and blowout from removing the screws.
I figure the varnish would dull the planner blades so I was planning on using the backs as the fronts and leaving the varnish where it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Lowes has 1x4x8 rough grade pine for 8.73 I'm gonna use what I need then try to sell the leftovers for $3-4 each Somebody will buy them Someone could biscuit joint them and make bread boards or whatever out of them
 
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