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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Evening:
I also went to my pool supply store to obtain calcium hypochlorite. They had Poolife brand "TurboShock." It was $14.85 for 5 pounds. Active ingredient:calcium hypochlorite 78% and other ingredients 22%. No one was aware of the substance of the other ingredient. I called the National Poison Control Hotline to find out. They also stated the ingredient was not known but, was a [inert] filler of sorts and not harmful.
I'm satisfied. I could decontaminate my well and everything else [for a long time] with 20 pounds of Turboshock. - Lauralei
"Granular Calcium Hypochlorite. Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately 1/4 ounce) for each two gallons of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 mg/L, since the calcium hypochlorite has an available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 oz.) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the water as described above."
I stopped at the local pool supply store to inquire about what they would recommend for drinking water purification. I was brought to everything but Calcium Hypochlorite. I had to ask the employee if he could verify this because it is important that I not get the wrong item. He continued to say “…this is what you want…” I asked another employee that was not privy to my discussion, and she said,…. “…this here is what you want…” Again, not the product I was looking for. In fact out of four employees, I was shown four different products. The female clerk was very inquisitive and very insistent. I told her that I thought it had calcium in it and she became even more awkward. I felt as if I was to be added to some list just for wanting to purify my water. I left there with the wrong product and was asked for my name on the receipt, (I paid cash). I wanted to bring this up as my guess is that there are those who choose to do something “illegal” with this product and it makes it harder for normal law abiding folk like myself to purchase.
I stopped at the local Big Box lumber yard and they had Calcium Hypochlorite, (a.k.a. Pool Shock) it was concerning as it states 50% Calcium Hypochlorite and 50% Other Ingredients. Making it a 50% available Chlorine.
In common language, … is this adequate? It does not seem to be of the 70% goal you mentioned on your earlier post. I think there is an equation that we need that is missing. The EPA site states there is an available 70% chlorine based on weight. Is this to be constructed as true for ALL Calcium Hypochlorite being equal to this ratio? What about the 50% OTHER INGREDIENTS? To make things more confusing, they offered another brand of this that had 47% Calcium Hypochlorite.
Please help close the gap on this topic as it is such an important one. - The Wanderer
A granular (dry powder) "pool shock" product that lists only Calcium Hypochlorite as the active ingredient should be safe to use for water purification. The problem with other varieties is that they include other algaecide or fungicide chemicals that are probably not safe for human consumption. Ditto for using liquid bleach for the same purpose.ou want to buy Calcium Hypochlorite bleach. Do NOT buy bleach with fabric softeners, scents, et cetera. Keep in mind that bleach solutions break down and weaken with time (anticipate a 24 month shelf life), but that dry granular bleach stores indefinitely

Only requires 6 drops of chlorine bleach, per 1 gallon of water, too purify for drinking, a little of this will go a very long way.
 

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Thanks for the info. CH is an ingredient in Chlorine bombs and IS probably on some sort of unofficial watch list.
 

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Good info RevPaul.
I have 101 uses for liquid bleach.
Keep in mind that bleach solutions break down and weaken with time (anticipate a 24 month shelf life), but that dry granular bleach stores indefinitely
Definitely something I need to czech out,.....I wonder if thats once it's open and exposed to air or does it naturally degrade in the plastic bottle?
Anyway, it's the best, cheapest sanitizer there is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As long as it is not in the mixed solution, IE: Liquid, it will keep forever, but as soon as you make the solution, it will degrade just like chlorox.
it tends too run $165.00 for a 60lb bucket.
and around $3.00 per 1lb bag
Remember, this is based off of a 78% base.
 
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If I remember correctly, we used SODIUM Hyperchlorite, to decontaminate chemical agents.
This Is not to be used, for any internal or on skin..bad stuff.
I may have the name wrong.
Thanks for the info. another source is always good!
 

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I just heard a rummor to the effect that chlorine is sometimes used to make Meth so there might be intrest by the law enforcement community if you bought a large amount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You are very correct, this is very "BAD" stuff, but remember the basic (6 Drops) of chlorine stock, will purify 1 gallon of water for drinking.
If you are not careful with this stuff, you may not live too regret it.
I never said that it was child proof, just great too purify water for drinking.
 

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I priced 20 pounds locally, it was 68% HC. Store originaly had it priced @ $97.00 then marked down to $77.00!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Only buy 78%
As this is the formula I have layed out, if you wish too work the numbers, you can go down too the 68%, but check out the fillers, make sure they are inert.
 

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I used to make my own beer and sterilized everything with bleach before use as to not contaminate the beer. One thing I learned was that it takes less chlorine to decontaminate cold water than it does hot water.

To get rid of the chlorine taste and smell all you have to do is let the water set for a day or so after sterilizing. The chlorine will evaporate off. This way you could always be decontaminating "the day after tomorrows" water while using water that has been sterilized AND had some/most of the chlorine removed. I've used this trick in fresh water aquariums when I've run out of dechlorinator.

Before anyone asks, I don't think aquarium declorinator is safe for human consumption.
 

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Calcium hypochlorite when desolved in water is very similar to normal bleach, which is sodium hypochlorite. It's called calcium hypochlorite because it's made up of two kinds of particles, calcium particles and hypochlorite particles. It's the hypochlorite particles that determine the effects of this chemical. That's why it's similar to bleach, because that also contains the hypochlorite particles.

So it's similar to bleach when it's desolved into water. I suggest you treat it as bleach and you're safe. Only use small concentrations, make sure you don't ingest too much of the stuff. It wouldn't be my first choice to sterlize water, but if it's all you got when shtf, it will do.
 

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Thanks for the info. CH is an ingredient in Chlorine bombs and IS probably on some sort of unofficial watch list.
Where I work has an indoor pool, and there's no problem purchasing Ca(ClO)2 in bulk of 50#+ when you are shocking a large pool.

I assisted in the shock procedure, and let there be no doubt, Calcium Hypochlorite is the shiznik when it comes to clearing water.

Wolfe said:
Calcium hypochlorite when desolved in water is very similar to normal bleach, which is sodium hypochlorite. It's called calcium hypochlorite because it's made up of two kinds of particles, calcium particles and hypochlorite particles. It's the hypochlorite particles that determine the effects of this chemical. That's why it's similar to bleach, because that also contains the hypochlorite particles.
The term isn't "particles" but rather "ions". The molecule dissociates into it's constituent ions, Ca++ and 2 ClO- ions. The hypochlorite ions are the ones that do the work. Sodium hypochlorite solution, a.k.a. chlorine bleach, is NaClO and dissociates with half the strength of the calcium variety.

I highly recommend keeping it in sealed buckets away from moisture.
 

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Diluted Hypochlorite aren’t very stable and normal bleach will not last much longer than a year. The solid salt, although not the most stable stuff, is much better to store for longer term. Remember it is corrosive to metals and a strong oxidizer too.
If we have a pandemic or other epidemic out break you will need scrub bleach by the bucket. Pool shock is the only practical way to store for that, IMO.
 

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The term isn't "particles" but rather "ions". The molecule dissociates into it's constituent ions, Ca++ and 2 ClO- ions. The hypochlorite ions are the ones that do the work. Sodium hypochlorite solution, a.k.a. chlorine bleach, is NaClO and dissociates with half the strength of the calcium variety.

I highly recommend keeping it in sealed buckets away from moisture.
I know that they are called ions. I study the bloody subject. But there is no use in using words that people don't understand.

And one Ca(ClO)2 weights almost as much as two NaClO particles (ions if you please). So one gram of calcium hypochlorite is close to the strength of one gram of sodium hypochlorite. Calcium hypochlorite is just a little stronger.
 

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http://www.protechpoolsupplies.com/Support-Docs/MSDS/Super-Pro-Shock.pdf

The MSDS for a similar product lists the "inert" ingredients as:

Sodium Chloride
Calcium Chlorate
Calcium Chloride
Calcium Hydroxide
Calcium Carbonate

I'm quite sure that the calcium chloride and chlorate are decomposition products. The calcium hydroxide and sodium chloride are most likely contaminates left over from its manufacture, and the calcium carbonate is likely formed from whatever hydroxide that was present being exposed to the air.
 

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Calcium Hypochlorite is the solid form of pool "chlorine" that comes as tabs or granular. It contains other chemicals that "stabilize" the chlorine and help keep it in your pool longer.
Sodium Hypochlorite is the liquid form that comes in the 2.5 gal yellow jugs. It is pure except for the water dilutent. It doesn't last as long as the granular form because it lacks the stabilizer.
Well operators buy many jugs of the stuff to sanitize water.
 

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Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical compound with formula Ca(ClO)2. It is widely used for water treatment and as a bleaching agent (bleaching powder). This chemical is considered to be relatively stable and has greater available chlorine than sodium hypochlorite (liquid bleach).

look here calcium hypochlorite 65
 

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Always a good idea to look up the MSDS on line before you lay in a quantity of a chemical compound. The inert ingredients are stabilizers (keep alkaline!) and no problem for purifying water in this one. Remember that it reacts with the moisture and carbon dioxide in the air and must be kept dry in Glass (corrodes metal and enough moisture comes through plastic to eventually cause it to swell & split) the container it comes in is not good enough for long term storage.
If you are caught in a pandemic situation, you may need bleach by the gallon for clean up & sanitizing. Solid Ca(ClO)2 seems your best bet. 230gr


PRODUCT NAME: HTH® POOLIFE™ TURBOSHOCK™ SHOCK TREATMENT


SECTION 1 PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION

REVISION DATE: 02-22-2002 SUPERCEDES: 02-06-2002
MSDS NO: 00025-9040 - 22401


MANUFACTURER: Arch Chemicals, Inc. 501 Merritt 7 PO Box 5204 Norwalk, CT 06856-5204


SYNONYMS: None
CHEMICAL FAMILY: Hypochlorite
FORMULA: Not Applicable/Mixture
DESCRIPTION: Sanitizer and Oxidizer
OSHA HAZARD CLASSIFICATION: Oxidizer, highly toxic by inhalation,
corrosive, skin and eye hazard, lung toxin

SECTION 2 COMPONENT DATA

PRODUCT COMPOSITION
CAS or CHEMICAL NAME: Calcium hypochlorite
CAS NUMBER: 7778-54-3
PERCENTAGE RANGE: 65-90%
HAZARDOUS PER 29 CFR 1910.1200: Yes
EXPOSURE STANDARD: 3 mg/cubic meter (ceiling) as Chlorine:
Internal Exposure Standard

CAS or CHEMICAL NAME: Sodium chloride
CAS NUMBER: 7647-14-5
PERCENTAGE RANGE: 0-3%
HAZARDOUS PER 29 CFR 1910.1200: No
EXPOSURE STANDARDS: None Established

CAS or CHEMICAL NAME: Calcium chlorate
CAS NUMBER: 10137-74-3
PERCENTAGE RANGE: 0-5%
HAZARDOUS PER 29 CFR 1910.1200: Yes
EXPOSURE STANDARDS: None Established

CAS or CHEMICAL NAME: Calcium chloride
CAS NUMBER: 10043-52-4
PERCENTAGE RANGE: 0-5%
HAZARDOUS PER 29 CFR 1910.1200: Yes
EXPOSURE STANDARDS: None Established

CAS or CHEMICAL NAME: Calcium hydroxide
CAS NUMBER: 1305-62-0
PERCENTAGE RANGE: 0-5%
HAZARDOUS PER 29 CFR 1910.1200: Yes
EXPOSURE STANDARDS:
OSHA(PEL) ACGIH(TLV)
ppm mg/cubic-meter ppm mg/cubic-meter
TWA: None 5
CEILIN None None
STEL: None None

CAS or CHEMICAL NAME: Calcium carbonate
CAS NUMBER: 471-34-1
PERCENTAGE RANGE: 0-4%
HAZARDOUS PER 29 CFR 1910.1200: Yes
EXPOSURE STANDARDS:
OSHA(PEL) ACGIH(TLV)
ppm mg/cubic-meter ppm mg/cubic-meter
TWA: 15 (Total dust) 10
5 (Respirable fraction)
CEILING None None
STEL: None None

CAS or CHEMICAL NAME: Water
CAS NUMBER: 7732-18-5
PERCENTAGE RANGE: 8-16%
HAZARDOUS PER 29 CFR 1910.1200: No
EXPOSURE STANDARDS: None Established

SECTION 3 PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND STORAGE

DO NOT TAKE INTERNALLY. AVOID INHALATION OF DUST AND FUMES. AVOID
CONTACT WITH EYES, SKIN OR CLOTHING. UPON CONTACT WITH SKIN OR EYES,
WASH OFF WITH WATER. REMOVE AND WASH CONTAMINATED CLOTHING BEFORE
REUSE.
STORAGE CONDITIONS: Keep product tightly sealed in original containers.
Store product in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area. Store away from
combustible or flammable products. Keep product packaging clean and
free of all contamination, including, e.g., other pool treatment
products, acids, organic materials, nitrogen-containing compounds, dry
powder fire extinguishers (containing mono-ammonium phosphate),
oxidizers, all corrosive liquids, flammable or combustible materials,
etc.
DO NOT STORE AT TEMPERATURES ABOVE: 52 Deg.C (125 Deg.F)
Storage above this temperature may result in rapid decomposition,
evolution of chlorine gas and heat sufficient to ignite combustible
products.
PRODUCT STABILITY AND COMPATIBILITY
SHELF LIFE LIMITATIONS: Shelf life (that is, the period of time before the
product goes below stated label strength) is determined by storage
time and temperatures. Do not store product at temperatures above 52
Deg.C (125 Deg.F). When stored under moderate temperature
conditions, product will maintain stated label strength for
approximately one year. Prolonged storage at 35 Deg.C (95 Deg.F) or
above will significantly shorten the shelf life. Storage in a
climate-controlled storage area or building is recommended in those
areas where extremes of high temperature occur.
INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS FOR PACKAGING: Product packaging must be clean
and free of contamination by other materials, including, e.g., other
pool treatment products, acids, organic materials, nitrogen-
containing compounds, dry powder fire extinguishers (containing mono-
ammonium phosphate), oxidizers, all corrosive liquids, flammable or
combustible materials, etc.
INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT: Do not allow product
to come in contact with other materials, including, e.g., other pool
treatment products, acids, organic materials, nitrogen-containing
compounds, dry powder fire extinguishers (containing mono-ammonium
phosphate), oxidizers, all corrosive liquids, flammable or
combustible materials, etc.

SECTION 4 PHYSICAL DATA

APPEARANCE: White, free flowing powder
FREEZING POINT: Not Applicable
BOILING POINT: Not Applicable
DECOMPOSITION TEMPERATURE: Onset - Approximately 170-180 Deg.C
(338-356 Deg.F)
SPECIFIC GRAVITY: Not Applicable
BULK DENSITY: 0.8 g/cc, loose
pH @ 25 DEG.C: 10.5-11.5 (1% solution)
VAPOR PRESSURE @ 25 DEG.C: Not Applicable
SOLUBILITY IN WATER: Approximately 18% @ 25 Deg.C. Product also contains
calcium hydroxide and calcium carbonate which will leave a residue.
VOLATILES, PERCENT BY VOLUME: Not Applicable
EVAPORATION RATE: Not Applicable
VAPOR DENSITY: Not Applicable
MOLECULAR WEIGHT: 143 (Active ingredient)
ODOR: Chlorine-like
COEFFICIENT OF OIL/WATER DISTRIBUTION: Not Applicable

SECTION 5 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS

PERSONAL PROTECTION FOR ROUTINE USE OF PRODUCT:
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Wear NIOSH approved respirator if dusts are
created.
VENTILATION: Use local exhaust ventilation to minimize dust and
chlorine levels where industrial use occurs. Otherwise,
ensure good general ventilation.
SKIN AND EYE PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT: Wear gloves and safety glasses to
avoid skin and eye contact. Where industrial use occurs,
chemical goggles or full impermeable suit may be required.
EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATIONS:
RESPIRATOR TYPE: NIOSH approved full face-piece respirator with
chlorine cartridges and dust/mist prefilter
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING TYPE: Neoprene
(This includes: gloves, boots, apron,
protective suit)

SECTION 6 FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD INFORMATION

This product is chemically reactive with many substances. Any contamina-
tion of the product with other substances by spill or otherwise may result
in a chemical reaction and fire. This product is a strong oxidizer which
is capable of intensifying a fire once started.

FLAMMABILITY DATA:
FLAMMABLE: No
COMBUSTIBLE: No
PYROPHORIC: No
FLASH POINT: Not Applicable
AUTOIGNITION TEMPERATURE: Not Applicable
FLAMMABLE LIMITS AT NORMAL ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE (PERCENT
VOLUME IN AIR): UEL - Not Applicable LEL - Not Applicable

NFPA RATINGS:
Health: 3
Flammability: 0
Reactivity: 1
Special Hazard Warning: OX (OXIDIZER)

HMIS RATINGS:
Health: 3
Flammability: 0
Reactivity: 1

EXTINGUISHING MEDIA:
Water only

FIRE FIGHTING TECHNIQUES AND COMMENTS:
Use water to cool containers exposed to fire. Also see Section 11.

OTHER: Do not use dry extinguishers containing ammonium compounds

SECTION 7 REACTIVITY INFORMATION

CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH THIS PRODUCT MAY BE UNSTABLE:
TEMPERATURES ABOVE: 170 Deg.C (338 Deg.F)
MECHANICAL SHOCK OR IMPACT: No
ELECTRICAL (STATIC) DISCHARGE: No
HAZARDOUS POLYMERIZATION: Will not occur
INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS: This product is chemically reactive with many
substances, including, e.g., other pool treatment products, acids,
organics, nitrogen-containing compounds, dry powder fire extinguishers
(containing mono-ammonium phosphate), oxidizers, corrosive, flammable
or combustible materials.
HAZARDOUS DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS: Chlorine gas
OTHER CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Storage at temperatures >125 Deg.F (52 Deg.C)
Prevent ingress of humidity and moisture into container or package.
Always close the lid.

SUMMARY OF REACTIVITY: (See also Section 6)
OXIDIZER: Yes
PYROPHORIC: No
ORGANIC PEROXIDE: No
WATER REACTIVE: No
OTHER: calcium hypochlorite products meet the specifications
of ASTM method E-487-74 as set forth in 49 C. F. R. Sec. 173.21,
Title 49-Code of Federal Regs.(DOT Regs.)

SECTION 8 FIRST AID

EYES: Immediately flush with large amounts of water for at least 15
minutes, occasionally lifting the upper and lower eyelids. Call a
physician at once.

SKIN: Immediately flush with water for at least 15 minutes. Call a
physician. If clothing comes in contact with the product, it should
be removed immediately and laundered before reuse.

INGESTION: Immediately drink large quantities of water. DO NOT induce
vomiting. Call a physician at once. DO NOT give anything by
mouth if the person is unconscious or if having convulsions.

INHALATION: Remove victim to fresh air. Support respiration if needed.
Call a physician.

SECTION 9 TOXICOLOGY AND HEALTH INFORMATION

ROUTES OF ABSORPTION
Inhalation, skin and eye contact, ingestion

WARNING STATEMENT AND WARNING PROPERTIES
MAY BE FATAL IF SWALLOWED. AVOID BREATHING DUST OR FUMES. HARMFUL
IF PRODUCT IS INHALED IN HIGH CONCENTRATIONS. CAUSES SKIN, EYE,
DIGESTIVE TRACT AND RESPIRATORY TRACT BURNS.

HUMAN RESPONSE DATA
ODOR THRESHOLD: Approximately 1.2 mg/cubic-meter, based on odor
threshold of chlorine.
IRRITATION THRESHOLD: Approximately 12-19 mg/cubic meter, based on the
irritation threshold of chlorine.
IMMEDIATELY DANGEROUS TO LIFE OR HEALTH: Approximately 39
mg/cubic-meter, based on IDLH concentration of chlorine.

SIGNS, SYMPTOMS, AND EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE

INHALATION
ACUTE:
Inhalation of dust or vapor from this product can be irritating to
the nose, mouth, throat and lungs. In confined areas, mechanical
agitation can result in high levels of dust, and reaction with
incompatible materials (as listed in Section VII) can result in high
concentrations of chlorine vapor, either of which may result in burns
to the respiratory tract, producing lung edema, shortness of breath,
wheezing, choking, chest pains, impairment of lung function and
possible permanent lung damage.
CHRONIC:
Chronic (repeated) inhalation exposure may cause impairment of lung
function and permanent lung damage.

EYE
Severe irritation and/or burns can occur following eye exposure.
Contact may cause impairment of vision and corneal damage.

SKIN
ACUTE:
Dermal exposure can cause severe irritation and/or burns characterized
by redness, swelling and scab formation. Prolonged skin exposure may
cause permanent damage.
CHRONIC:
Effects from chronic skin exposure would be similar to those from
single exposure except for effects secondary to tissue destruction.

INGESTION
ACUTE:
Irritation and/or burns can occur to the entire gastrointestinal
tract, including the stomach and intestines, characterized by nausea,
vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, bleeding and/or tissue
ulceration. Due to the corrosive nature of this product, ingestion
may be fatal.
CHRONIC:
There are no known or reported effects from chronic exposure except
for effects similar to those experienced from single exposure.

MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY EXPOSURE
Asthma, respiratory and cardiovascular disease

INTERACTIONS WITH OTHER CHEMICALS WHICH ENHANCE TOXICITY
None known or reported

ANIMAL TOXICOLOGY
ACUTE TOXICITY:
Inhalation LC 50: Approximately 1100 mg/cubic-meter (1 hr., rat) -
based on acute inhalation toxicity for chlorine
Oral LD 50: 850 mg/kg. (rat)
Dermal LD 50: > 2 g/kg. (rabbit)
Causes burns to eyes and skin

CHRONIC TARGET ORGAN TOXICITY:
There are no known or reported effects from repeated exposure.

REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY:
Calcium hypochlorite has been tested for teratogenicity in laboratory
animals. Results of this study have shown that calcium hypochlorite is
not a teratogen.

CARCINOGENICITY:
This product is not known or reported to be carcinogenic by any
reference source, including: IARC, OSHA, NTP or EPA.
One hundred mice were exposed dermally 3 times a week for 18 months to
a solution of calcium hypochlorite. Histopathological examination
failed to show an increased incidence of tumors.

IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) reviewed studies
conducted with several hypochlorite salts. IARC has classified
hypochlorite salts as having inadequate evidence for carcinogenicity
to humans and animals. IARC therefore considers hypochlorite salts to
be not classifiable as to their carcinogenicity to humans.

MUTAGENICITY:
Calcium hypochlorite has been tested in the Dominant lethal assay in
male mice, and it did not induce a dominant lethal response.

Calcium hypochlorite has been reported to produce mutagenic activity
in two in vitro assays. It has, however, been shown to lack the
capability to produce mutations in animals based on results from the
micronucleus assay. In vitro assays frequently are inappropriate to
judge the mutagenic potential of bactericidal chemicals due to a high
degree of cellular toxicity. The concentration which produces
mutations in these in vitro assays is significantly greater than the
concentrations used for disinfection. Based on high cellular toxicity in
in vitro assays and the lack of mutagenicity in animals, the risk of
genetic damage to humans is judged not significant.
 

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Be wary of the chem majors, they know how to make a mustard gas bombs in pressure released pencils. Just so that the next time you use that pencil, you get a nice fog of mustard gas.
 
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