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Prov 3:18
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We keep several CATs ,but it is mainly due to the availability and price on the surplus market(usually around 10 bucks).The newer SOFT-W would be my choice if price weren't a factor.It has a metal windlass and is longer and slightly wider than the others I have seen/used but at 30 bucks it's hard to justify several.I don't have any experience with the MAT.You might also consider the SWAT-T or the TK-4L both are simpler and the SWAT-t is multipurpose(can be used as a compression bandage as well).I keep a SWAT-T in my edc because of this dual purpose.
 

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Where are you finding CAT's for $10?? All I see are 30-50. In emt class they use MAT and the instructors said its the only one used by the military, as well as an enlisted student. Everything I find online says CAT is the choice.
 

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Where are you finding CAT's for $10?? All I see are 30-50. In emt class they use MAT and the instructors said its the only one used by the military, as well as an enlisted student. Everything I find online says CAT is the choice.
This is bad information.

The Mat's and CAT's are both prone to breaking. The SOF-T is the best choice but I disagree that the newer wide ones (SOFT-W) are better. The originals are better in my opinion.

I second the recommendation on the new SWAT-T; it works good and is multi-purpose. It is the only one you can find for $10.00 bucks. THe others are around $30.00 or higher.

I carry 2 SWAT-T's and 4 SOFT-T in my aid bag. This load out just gives me more options. Also, plan on having to use multiple tq's on thigh injuries. If the first doesn't completely stop the bleeding, you can crank down on the other one and if the first breaks you have a back-up. Live by the adage of two is one and one is none.

Hope this helps,
BK
 

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I have a CAT and I paid $12 on FlEabay + shipping. I've practiced with it and it works pretty well.

I talked to an ER Doc last summer and he felt they are waaay under utilized in the modern era of EMS.
 

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Shook One
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Here you go. I could give you article after article, but I'll let your Google Fu go to work. Enjoy!

http://www.tacmedkits.com/training-development/battlefield-tourniquets-modern-combat-lifesavers/

Here are the TCCC guidelines from 2009. They were recently updated in 2010. you can probably find them here on this site.
http://casualtycareandrescue.net/2010/02/03/tccc-guidelines-february-2009/
I can see their use on the battlefield where the limb may lost already, and I also see that they are said to be more like direct pressure bandages now, which all makes sense towards maintaining it as an option. Still, civilians are better off with direct pressure.
 

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I can see their use on the battlefield where the limb may lost already, and I also see that they are said to be more like direct pressure bandages now, which all makes sense towards maintaining it as an option. Still, civilians are better off with direct pressure.
I mostly agree with your statement, but the original question was "which is the better tq"; not should civy's be using them.

There are practical tourniquet applications for Tactical medics and those medics that encounter GSW's in the field. I am both of those, which is why I carry them.

Hopefully I changed your mind if even a little.


BK
 

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Shook One
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I mostly agree with your statement, but the original question was "which is the better tq"; not should civy's be using them.

There are practical tourniquet applications for Tactical medics and those medics that encounter GSW's in the field. I am both of those, which is why I carry them.

Hopefully I changed your mind if even a little.


BK
Yeah, but it is common to hear of people still trying their own in situations where it's not the best approach. With that, it's important to have the discussion one more time in the wider view. It's carried in specific combat scenarios for reason, but not the civilian norm for a reason too. At $10, cant argue on price, but I could often argue about the real usefulness and helpfulness of it as a tool. I'd personally not want someone using something that is potentially the wrong tool for the job if I was bleeding, just because they had it or heard of one and thought it was a good idea.
 

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Everything should be tempered by training.

As I mentioned in my first post, In todays "modern era of EMS".

No matter where you are, if you need one, you are in deep ****
 

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I'd personally not want someone using something that is potentially the wrong tool for the job if I was bleeding, just because they had it or heard of one and thought it was a good idea.
Well said. :thumb:

If you like this thread you should read the one on Quickclot. :eek: Your quote really applies to that one.

BK
 

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It's carried in specific combat scenarios for reason, but not the civilian norm for a reason too.
Because civilian EMs are not necessarily provided an employer mandate to deliver state of the art care. Litigation concerns drive exposure to liability...and limit what techniques or care they may deliver on the scene. The military has occasionally been accused of teaching ancient technique. In this case, the "modern" EMS field is guilty of the same thinking. Thankfully, that's starting to change.

A lot of EMS "wisdom" concerning tourniquets is based upon outdated data and obsolescent studies. The bias against tourniquet use is then further espoused by the very people who've been institutionally forbidden from using them. A self-licking ice cream cone situation.

SOF-T for me as I don't worry about it breaking.
 
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