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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A common theme on this sight is stretching our preparedness dollars, this post is concerned with doing that by purchasing used firearms. I would like to post a couple thoughts on purchasing used firearms but this is an expansive topic so it would be expected that others on the board will have additional tips and advice to add on this subject. I am starting with the basics which will be useful to those new to buying used and maybe as a refresher for the more experienced.

Common reasons to purchase a used firearm are to save money or acquire a model no longer in production. When I started my collection, I bought used because I enjoyed owning and shooting guns I could not afford otherwise. Through the years, I have even made an occasional profit selling a gun that I purchased used simply because I was able to recognize it was an exceptional deal.

If you are not an experienced used gun buyer, perhaps the easiest thing is to buy from somebody you trust. Reputable gun shops are also a good choice and generally allow more time to examine firearms than private sales and gun shows. Reputable gun shops are looking for repeat customers not one-time sales and they usually have inspected firearms for condition and safety before putting them on display. Either way they should be able to give you an honest appraisal of the firearm you are looking at. For beginners I would say that buying anything that you are not allowed to inspect before purchase isn't advisable.

The first thing you have to do is know what you are looking for i.e. do want the gun for hunting, self-defense, sport shooting, or for a collection. Once you have decided what you want, know the going price and what you are willing to pay for it. At this point, a good investment is a book on gun values but realize it is just a guide and can be a year or two out of date when it is new and may not account for the regional price variances that come into play.

If you decide not to buy from somebody you know or reputable gun shop you can opt for a private sale or one of the various dealers at a gun show. We all like gun shows and there are many good deals to be had once you know what to look for and the same can be said for private sales but you need the tools so buy a good bore light.

Now it is time to go shopping despite the excitement it pays to be patient. If you're in too much of a hurry, you might as well buy new firearm because finding a good used firearm that will meet your needs can take some time. Of course, now you have to learn what to look for and if you're in doubt about your purchase seek the advice of a knowledgeable friend or gunsmith. The trick to getting the best deal as well as meeting your needs and budget is to know a few simple tricks, guidelines, and a little etiquette.

Never touch a firearm or remove the safety tie without permission from the owner. At a gun show look for signs on a vendor’s table that indicate what is appropriate as some firearms may be valuable collector items and for display only. If a firearm is under glass, do not ask to handle it unless you have serious intent to buy. Additionally, many dealers will have security wires running through the trigger guards - don’t unhook them.

Ensure that all firearms you handle are unloaded.
Don't sweep anybody with the barrel.
Don’t dry fire as a rule and never without asking.
Try not to hold guns by the metal if possible.
Don’t rack the action or slam the cylinder of a revolver closed gently handle firearms.
If you decide not to purchase, just say thank you and set the gun back down just as you found it.
Be ready to negotiate but not argue over the price don't be afraid to offer less than asking price but don't make a ridiculous offer.
Never interrupt a “sale in progress” by trying to purchase an item someone else is holding or negotiating a price for a particular firearm.

I personally begin to ask questions once I find something I am interested in purchasing. As you get used to the process, you may develop your own favorite questions to ask but here are some common suggestions: Why are you selling the gun? Have you fired the gun? Has it ever malfunctioned? Is anything wrong with it? Does it work reliably and is it accurate? What was the gun used for? Why did the owner buy it? Is it all factory or has it been customized in some way? How much has it been fired? If the seller seems evasive or says they do not know, I will examine everything more closely especially if the seller appears evasive. An evasive seller or one that will not look me in the eye usually causes me to pass, regardless of how good the deal is.

I also ask if there is a return time period in case I get the gun home and find a problem. I always feel better about a purchase if I have three or four days to return the firearm for a full refund and I determine where it has to be returned. When you are purchasing through a dealer ask about a warranty. Examining a firearm in the store and field testing it are two very different things, so ask about a warranty. Some dealers let you take a firearm home to try it and then bring it back if it isn't what you were expecting. This is not always the case so ask before buying. In this kind of situation always test firearms for function and accuracy with factory loads. If there is a problem, both you and the dealer will want to be sure that reloads (or cheap high capacity mags) aren’t to blame.

The next step is to inspect the gun thoroughly ask if it is ok to inspect the firearm and sometimes again when it is time to inspect the action. First, examine the gun looking for noticeable rust and other problems. If at this point, it is dirty and you are still interested, it is common to ask the owner to run a patch through it before you make a decision. During your initial inspection check that all screws are tight and check the crown for wear, ensuring the barrel is straight and free of bulges or blemishes. Next, hold the gun in your hand and make sure that the grip fits your hand well and feels right.

Finally, take a good look at the rifle's bore by inserting your bore light in the chamber area and look down the bore starting at the muzzle inspecting the rifling, which should be clean and sharp. If there is fouling, that needs to be brushed or patched out, it is a sign that the firearm has not been properly maintained. Look closely for rust or pitting getting as close a look at the chamber as possible, inspect the extractor, ejector or ejector slot, bolt face, and any locking lugs to ensure that is no pitting. A pitted chamber can mean extraction trouble, especially in the survivalist’s favorite choices autos and pumps. Don’t forget to test the safety and check the bolt or cylinder for excessive play

I usually buy used firearms that are at least 85% - 100% of new condition. However, if you decide to buy something more thoroughly used you should also be ready to replace some parts or even consider a replacement or custom barrel as part of the cost of some purchases. Of course, this parts list can expand greatly especially if want to purchase a model no longer in production. Hope that some find this used firearm primer useful or as an excuse to add their own advice.
 

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Thanks for the laying out a good set of basics. It can get to be a little overwhelming your first time out. I am still not sure about what the terms like mint or like new mean exactly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Used Firearm Glossary:

Typically I do not put much faith in these kinds of descriptions I find them to be too subjective. I did find a bit of sarcasm concerning this topic online that you may enjoy.


MINT CONDITION: In original condition as manufactured, unfired, and preferably in the original box with all manufacturer's tags, labels, and paperwork.

NEAR-MINT CONDITION: Has had no more than 5,000 rounds fired through it and it still retains at least 60% of the original finish. Surface pitting is no more than 1/8" deep, and both grip panels are in place. If it is a .22, some of the rifling is still visible.

VERY GOOD: Non-functional when you buy it, but you can probably get it to work if you replace 100% of the parts.

FAIR: Rusted into a solid mass with a shape vaguely reminiscent of a firearm.

TIGHT: In revolvers, the cylinder swings out, but you need both hands to close it again. For autoloaders, you must bang the front of the slide on a table to push it back.

REALLY TIGHT: In revolvers you cannot open the cylinder without a lever. Once it's open the extractor rod gets stuck halfway through it's travel. On autoloaders, you need a hammer to close the slide.

A LITTLE LOOSE: In revolvers, the cylinder falls out and the chambers are 1/4" out of line when locked up. There is no more than 1/2" of end play. For autoloaders, the barrel falls out when the slide is retracted. If the barrel stays in place, the slide falls off.

GOOD BORE: You can tell it was once rifled and even approximately how many grooves there were.

FAIR BORE: Would be similar to a GOOD BORE, if you could see light through it.

NEEDS A LITTLE WORK: May function sometimes if you have a gunsmith replace minor parts, such as the bolt, cylinder, or barrel.

ARSENAL RECONDITIONED: I cleaned it up with a wire wheel and some stuff I bought at K-Mart.

ANTIQUE: I found it in a barn, and I think it dates from before 1960. Note that ANTIQUE guns are usually found in FAIR condition.

RARE VARIANT: No more than 500,000 of this model were ever made, not counting the ones produced before serial numbers were required. RARE VARIANTS command a premium price of 150% of BOOK VALUE.

BOOK VALUE: An irrational number which dealers consider insultingly low and buyers ridiculously high. Since no one pays any attention to it, it doesn't matter.

BELONGED TO MY GRANDFATHER: I bought it at a flea market two weeks ago.

CIVIL WAR RELIC: The vendor's great-grandfather knew a man whose friend had been in the Civil War.

SHOOTS REAL GOOD: For rifles, this means at 100 yards it will put every shot into a 14" circle if there isn't any wind and you're using a machine rest. For handguns, three out of six rounds will impact a silhouette target at seven yards. In shotguns, it means that the full choke tube throws 60% patterns with holes no bigger than 8" in them.

I'LL LET IT GO FOR WHAT I HAVE IN IT: I'll settle for what I paid for it plus 250% profit.

MAKE ME AN OFFER: How dumb are you?

HOW MUCH IT'S WORTH TO YOU: I'll bet you're even dumber than you look.

ON CONSIGNMENT: The vendor at the show does not own the gun. It belongs to a friend, customer, or business associate, and he has been instructed to sell it, for which he will be paid a commission. He has no authority to discuss price. The price marked is 150% above BOOK VALUE.

All used guns, without exception, are ON CONSIGNMENT, and the dealer is required by his Code of Ethics to tell you this as soon as you ask the price. A BATF study has proven that since 1934 there has never been a single authenticated case of a used gun being offered for sale at a gun show that was actually owned by the dealer showing it.
 

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I am only 17 years old with little money, so buying a cheap rifle is my only option. Im thinking about going for a mosin nagnant and then mabeye a single shot shotgun. Thanks for these tips!
 

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I'd never bought a new firearm until this year...and even this year it's still 50/50 for me. The two I have bought were from friends that I trusted.
 

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i've bought 2 new guns i think. I've bought probably 6 used online with only pictures and descriptions and I havent had any bad experiences yet, but I have been careful to look at the reputation of the seller and to ask many very specific questions regarding the condition of the particular gun, the owners experience on the gun and reasons for selling, Plus making sure that the seller is easy to reach and communicate with. How the seller conducts business, the care they take in completing the transaction, and how they accomidate you in the transaction usually reflects how well they take care of their weapons.

I've also bought firearms that tend to be very rugged and reliable to begin with.
 

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i was thinking of buying a mossberg 590 and a ruger 10/22 once i get the dam paper
should i buy new ? (never owned a firearm before and my arm never cought fire either )

i know nothing about firearms ... in fact id say i know less than nothing :p
 

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i was thinking of buying a mossberg 590 and a ruger 10/22 once i get the dam paper
should i buy new ? (never owned a firearm before and my arm never cought fire either )

i know nothing about firearms ... in fact id say i know less than nothing :p
I would recommend that you look into a basic firearms safety course prior to a firearms purchase.

11B
 

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I would recommend that you look into a basic firearms safety course prior to a firearms purchase.

11B
firearm safty course is madatory here for obtaining purchasing & possesion firearm permit there is also an aditional course needed for hunting and another course for obtaining the restricted guns permit aswell
:thumb:

also ill probably go read some books at the library :p (book rat :D: )
 

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firearm safty course is madatory here for obtaining purchasing & possesion firearm permit there is also an aditional course needed for hunting and another course for obtaining the restricted guns permit aswell
:thumb:

also ill probably go read some books at the library :p (book rat :D: )
its idiot proof... well almost I got 100 percent on the test why I knew basic stuff dont point at anything you dont want to shoot.. to unload take the mag out frist then check the chamber.. handling the gun allways have the barrel pointed down range up in the air or into the ground leave the chamber open when puting it down on the table.. and for restricted you just need to know the diffrence between a single action and a double action and flint lock stuff.. if you know that you can pass its bascily how do you load a black powder rifle is a question on the test.. then its a test to see if you know how to work the safty and unload it ect..
 
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