Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at buying some land and the area I'm looking at is near a national forest. Some of the properties are a few miles away, some are touching the forest, some are even surrounded by the forest (actually only one...only around an acre, I don't get it). The forest land was bought during the depression and turned into the forest so parts of it are fairly scattered with private plots here and there (what I'm looking at buying).

Anyway, are there any pros/cons to living near or damn near inside a national forest? I remember reading one post where someone recommended buying land surrounded on three sides by state or national forest but gave no reason as to why. Not the reason I'm looking, the area I'm interested in just happens to be laden with national forest land.
 

·
Adaptable.
Joined
·
1,978 Posts
hey neighbor. I'm on 44 bordered on 3 sides by timber preserve, which is encroached upon itself by state parks in all directions.

Pros: beauty, solitude, almost guaranteed no neighbors in the future, privacy, ease of concealment, lots of hard to follow routes out.

Cons: lots of solitude, your roads are your problem... So are water, electricity and waste. Getting stuck on the wrong side of a windfallen tree and having to walk home for the chainsaw. You will live with animals. Deer will eat your garden, cougars will eat your deer, and bears will eat your trash. Think snowed in sucks? Try snowed out.

It is a challenge, but I love it. I woulnt want to live anywhere else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
The major cons are everybody wants that kind of land so it can get expensive. Also if hunting is allowed in the public land you will have hunters that "accidentally" come on to your place from the public land. If it isn't hunters it's backpackers that are looking for solitude and didn't know that the fence through the middle of the woods meant they were crossing onto private land. "What no trespassing signs? I didn't see any." Another bad thing is if the government wants to expand their land use in any way they can condemn you land and buy it right out from under you. This includes if you start making someone in the government nervous because you have been buying too many weapons. Suddenly they will come up with a plan to create a wildlife sanctuary and it will include your land. Next thing you know the Sheriff is at your door giving you your notice. There may be restrictions on what you place can look like if you are near any trails or waterways. Along one of our national trails all houses must be painted in mute colors so they can not be seen so readily from the trail. No extra cars or trucks can be scattered around the land and trailers are not allowed. Services are bad the further out you get so don't expect to see the fire department until your house is gone. This means your insurance will be going up too. You will be in charge of building and maintaining your own road so be prepared to shuck out big bucks if you need to hire someone to do this. And driveways leading off main roads are fun for kids in the quads to drive down, so don't shoot the neighborhood kids.

Those are the major cons that I can think of. I'm sure there are others but balances agaisnt the pros I would rather live out here where I do. It does take cash though if you plan on making it a permanent residence.

blt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
The people that will flee in a panic without any prior preparations- i.e, with no place to go- some of these will end up in national forests.

Most will be ill equipped, fairly unprepared and under skilled. They will have families "used" to living high on the hog though. They wouldn't have went to the woods without weapons.

You can finish the story from here...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
My Brother's in-laws own a home bordering a national forest. Its absolutely beautiful but in the summer its crawling with vacationers. They are on a nice lake though. The local government is also pretty over the top when it comes to regulations. Im sure you can find much less traveled and regulated areas though but like the previous post mentioned unless it is really remote people are gonna flock their when the SHTF.

BTW their neighbor literally shoots at blacks bears with a .45 off his back porch when they come to raid his bird feeders.
 

·
Adaptable.
Joined
·
1,978 Posts
insurance goes up? Hahahaha... Wait a second... Hahahahahahahaha.

Out here, you need to oitcompete the fire services if you want insurance. I can't get fire insurance, nor can 90% of my neighbors. Road is too narrow, woods too dense, not enough water storage on site, blah blah blah. I know insurance is nothing but a gamble, so I understand.

As for hikers,if one showed up here, I'd welcome them! They would have crossed two rivers and hiked over 18 miles of trails to get here from the closest point. And most of that is unmaintained skid roads. As pretty as the woods are, those trails are ugly if you don't know where you are going.
 

·
free man
Joined
·
626 Posts
The biggest problem with isolation is theft.
No. Its the opposite. Thieves are generally lazy cowards. They aren't gonna drive to..then hike long distances..thru the woods..just to steal from you. Plus if your isolated, theres just plain less people around to steal from you. And since there's less people, strangers stand out like sore thumbs to all the locals that might see them.

Also, most people living in the mtns tend to have guns(at least the ones here in the NC mtns do). Thieves take the path of least resistance. 'Getting shot' isn't the least resistance.

We're fairly isolated(10 heavily wooded acres surrounded by also heavily wooded extended-family land/US forest service land/Cherokee reservation land/Smokey Mtn national park, all being 100% wilderness otherwise)..and I can't remember the last time we've locked the door or otherwise worried about such(yes it still exists somewhere), or even heard of any thefts..except maybe in town(small as it is) where its more dense w some low income housing. Well...once a few yrs ago, when the brother in law down the road took a shot at someone one night prowling around down near his barn. Never ever had a problem since regarding that :thumb:.

Unless you've got an official hiking trail thru your property, wayward hikers is the last thing I'd worry about. Hunters, possibly. Hikers, no.

I'm backed up to the main spine of the Appalachian Trail. Its literally a 2.5 mile/1200' vertical gain hike up to the ridge/trail via a maze of old grown over log'n roads, and then some bushwacking. Over the last 4yrs, I've seen exactly ONE hiker come down off the trail and come by our place, lost. We gave him a ride into town.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
thanks for all the responses. I've got a good list of things to check out when scouting the properties now. I'm only slightly familiar with the area, mostly passing through it on SR's and some county roads. It will be interesting to see the roads leading to the properties. I do some hiking in the NF but haven't really been too close to where the properties I'm looking at are. I plan on taking the known hiking trails as close as I can and then coming in from the backside to check out the area once I narrow the list of properties down. (as well as going in from the front :upsidedown:) Most of them do not have dwellings or residents. Oh and I'm lucky regarding CCW, my governor seems to be pro 2nd amendment. He's passed some nice laws in the past. (Lifetime CCW FTW).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
The biggest problem with isolation is theft.

I think that would depend on what a person means by isolation. If you mean living a few miles out of town on an easy to travel road, maybe. Mostly by the local kids who are too isolated from town to get there to steal.

Out here any idiot that wanted to steal from us would then have the carry whatever they stold out of here. I would love to track the fool that decided to lug out my valuables across the swamps for miles. I'm giggling at the picture now. They'd probably be too tired to rob us by the time they got to the house. It would be easier to get a real job.:D:

Last summer I had to hunt to find the house keys because I hardly ever lock the place. None of us in the valley do and yet we have never been robbed. The only reason I can think of why we don't is because of our isolation.

The reason people steal is because it's easier than working. True isolation makes it hard. Lazy people don't like hard.

blt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
insurance goes up? Hahahaha... Wait a second... Hahahahahahahaha.

Out here, you need to oitcompete the fire services if you want insurance. I can't get fire insurance, nor can 90% of my neighbors. Road is too narrow, woods too dense, not enough water storage on site, blah blah blah. I know insurance is nothing but a gamble, so I understand.
.
Where I lived before I couldn't get fire insurance either. They said the roads were too bad for the big reds to drive on. Now it's a housing development. Everyone wants to live near parks and forest. I'm so glad I moved when I did.

I'm much more isolated now because I know all the landowners around me and they aren't all the taxpayers of the United States. It was amazing to find hiker trash out in the bogs (makes me wonder how many bodies are out there still), on cliffs, and in the water at the bottom of the falls.

blt
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
23,890 Posts
My land is forest.

Maine has very little 'national forest', all of the land was bought into private ownership before the Fed got into the business of owning land. Still over 90% of the state is timber forest.

We really like living inside the forest. :)
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top