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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody use one of these?

I'm looking for a very sturdy kerosene stove that will safely support a full 6 quart iron dutch oven.

Or do you know of an even sturdier kerosene stove?

Thanks.
 

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Adaptable.
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What I found off google seems interesting, but I had never heard of them before. Do you have a link to what you are looking at? Curious myself.

Is the kerosene pressurized? Can it simmer? I've used compressed kerosene in my msr whisperlite multi-fuel, and there is a trick to simmer with it. But without doing that, I'd be curious how well such a large Dutch oven would handle the torch effect of pressurized fuel stoves. I imagine some "heavily cooked" bottoms, and a "less than cooked" middle core. But I'm a campfire dutchovener myself.

-g

If youre curious, the trick to simmering with compressed liquid fuel stoves: when you need to simmer, turn off the stove and remove the fuel canister. Walk a few feet away, and crack the seal on the fuel canister to let air out and depressirize the canister. Close it back up, give it one pump, and reattach it to your stove. Turn on the valve while holding a match to your stove. If you did everything fast enough, you should have a small ring of fire. Slowly pump the canister to bring the flame up to the desired level.

This only works with stoves that have a removable fuel canister. Doing this with something like a peak-one stove WILL explode when the compressed air in the tank hits the primed stove top. Likewise with propane.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
People cook all over the world with kerosene stoves, so it must be possible to simmer. :)

And this sounds crazy, but after looking at the pictures, I realized that I think I have a butterfly stove somewhere in my garage (y2k preps)! I'll go on a search for it tomorrow!

It's a two burner, and if I remember correctly, I bought it because it was sturdier than a regular camp stove.

Isn't it pitiful that I'm just remembering this? arggghhhh
 

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The one burner butterfly stove is a cheap Chinese copy of the Britelyt stove made in Florida, they are the company that own the rights to the petromax design. There are occasional problems with the Butterfly brand lanterns, may or may not happen to their stoves. The Britelyt stove will burn anything from alcohol, gasoline, or kerosene to used motor oil or bio-diesel, maybe the same thing will work in the copy. Having a stove that will burn anything is a good thing.
 

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No doubt people can simmer with kerosene, but it is a trade off. Most kerosene cook stoves are gravity or wick fed, meaning a lower btu per ounce of fuel than using pressurized tank stoves. (just means the fuel is pressurized in the fuel chamber allowing use of jets instead of wicks) the small droplets formed by the jets combust more quickly and efficiently than the slow draw of wicks or burn pans fed by gravity.I'm curious if the stove being looks at uses a pressurized tank or a wick.

Wick and gravity fed stoves are also more prone to oily smoke.

I've now found a bit more info on butterfly stoves, and it appears they are wick driven. Some models use a proprietary wick, others use standard 3/8th inch braids, which can. E replaced with strings off a mop head.

Seem to be intereting devices, but for emergencies I'll stick with my whisperlite, as it does petrol, white fuel, kerosene, etc. Your milage may vary, as my day to day cooking is on propane or wood, so I'm not worried about short term supply interuptions, I want something light and efficient for evacs.
 

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The Butterfly stove is on my list of "need one of those!"

I'm a big fan of kerosene as an emergency fuel. I like that it stores well for long periods of time.

I have a 23k btu heater stashed for emergency heat, some kerosene lamps and lanterns, and I plan to add this to my collection of "readyness" equipment for cooking:

http://www.stpaulmercantile.com/Butt24182419.htm

St. Paul Merchantile carries a number of different models. They are very popular in parts of the world where electricity is unreliable.

They are inexpensive, and IMO, a wise addition to anyone's prep plans.
 

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That looks pretty cool. Any idea how wide or long the wicks are? Can you run the stove on methylated spirits or naptha? It will certainly simmer as it is a wick based flame. Looks good!
 

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These seem to use a flat wick, don't know how long they are, and I'm not aware of them being considered "multi-fuel."

But they are simple in construction and design.

I considered getting one of Britelyt's pressure stoves, but my wife has enough trouble trying to light their (excellent) lanterns. She would be the primary user of the stove, so I have to keep her in mind with these things.......
 

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Butterfly is fine. You need to mod it when new to make it decent, but after that, it works well. The kero stinks and you need to keep a window open, but it does work well. got mine at S tPaul Mercantle for about $25. Go to endoftimesreport.com for links to intructions on how to set up and mod one for good ops.

Bubba
 

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What is storage like on kerosene? Does it go bad like gasoline?
Kerosene is much more stable than gasoline, and can be stored for a long time. Also, since it is less volatile, storage of kerosene is safer.

Kerosene has pretty much of the same qualities as diesel. In fact the Norwegian army uses a kerosene/diesel mix as fuel for the Optimus hiker 111 stoves used by soldiers to cook and keep tents warm on winter drills - which tend to get pretty darn cold. Diesel can replace kerosene as fuel for these stoves, although the smell will be bad and the emission of dangerous fumes makes it necessary to cook outdoors. On some diesel cars diesel can be replaced with kerosene as fuel, not that I will assume responsibility if anyone decides to test this out without consulting the car manufacturer.

That being said, I have much experience with pressure kerosene stoves, and can really recommend them. They will work in very low temperatures and at high altitudes, and will run on anything from kerosene via diesel to paint or bad breath.
 

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I have a couple of Butterfly wick stoves that I am really impressed with. They do simmer well but have enough BTU output to boil a large pot of water in a short period of time. I have a Butterfly #2487 that works great and I just ordered an A822 22 wick aluminum stove that has a whopping 14K BTU output. These stoves are so simple they're elegant.

I also own a Chicom copy of the Butterfly #2698 that is decent but not nearly as nice as the original.

I purchased mine from stpaulmercantile.com. They were great to deal with and ship very quickly.
 

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I have an Alpaca - similar to Butterfly.
I haven't put it to any serious use, but tests went okay.

They're run on a wick, exactly like your typical kerosene heater.
They all have warnings not to use them indoors due to possible carbon monoxide problems, but I think most camping stoves are the same in that matter.

We have a dual burner propane stove that we use for power outages. I like having the Alpaca as a fallback.
 

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Deus exsisto laus
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My family was stationed at Clark AFB in the Philippines and Andersen AFB in Guam back in the 70s. We had typhoons come through regularly. My father picked up a couple of the brass butterfly stoves. I can't recommend them more highly. TP
 

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Anybody use one of these?

I'm looking for a very sturdy kerosene stove that will safely support a full 6 quart iron dutch oven.

Or do you know of an even sturdier kerosene stove?

Thanks.
The Alpaca stove is even larger and similar in strength. It is designed for kerosene and used daily by people world wide. At the min flame (wick) setting the flame is barely 1" above the burner. At full power it channels a blue flame 4" in dia and 8-10" above the top of the stove top (16" above the burner).
 

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My grandmother cooked on a kerosene stove till the day she died and let me tell you she simmered soups all the time. A decent kerosene stove will do anything you need done. Her's was not pressurized just gravity flow with adjustable wick.
 

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I have a 2 burner "Butterfly" stove that was given to me by my wife's Grandfather. He used it in his cabin in Upton Maine. It takes a flat wick and has a one gallon glass fuel tank that sits in a holder on the left side of the stove. It works really well and I have tried it out several times. Once the stove gets to a certain temperature it vaporizes the kerosene and puts out a really, really hot jet like flame from the wicks. It does give off a kerosene smell if used inside a camper or small room. I purchased some K1 kerosene at a local hardware store and it was $21.00 for 2 gallons of kerosene. I thought that was a ripoff since I remember purchasing kerosene as a kid for 15 cent a gallon. My wife told me to take it easy since that was 50 years ago. The stove does work well but that is just my opinion. SEMPER FI
 

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I purchased some K1 kerosene at a local hardware store and it was $21.00 for 2 gallons of kerosene. I thought that was a ripoff since I remember purchasing kerosene as a kid for 15 cent a gallon. My wife told me to take it easy since that was 50 years ago. The stove does work well but that is just my opinion. SEMPER FI
Good lord! K-1 is $4.49 a gallon at the gas station a block from my house.
 
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