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Here is a couple of links on this new H5N1 story. This is not good at all. I think it has a high kill rate of 60%.

I feel 2012 is going to be a year we will never forget. There are soooo many things going on all at the same time it is almost mind boggling!!

Know your Savior Jesus Christ!! With him, regardless of what happens, it is a Win Win Situation!!

God be with us!!

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2011/12/30/world/asia/AP-AS-China-Bird-Flu.html?_r=1

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpr...h-h5n1-infection-no-known-contacts-with-fowl/

http://www.prisonplanet.com/did-the...e-us-govt-to-block-deadly-bird-flu-study.html
 

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I was given an H1N1 vaccine by a state health official at a public university during that whole scare (was an undergrad at the time). I was actually given 1.5 vaccines because the needle broke off during the whole thing and only part of it was given to me to my horror and they simply topped me off lol.

In terms of this H5N1 thing I am not sure what to say. I hope it doesn't become a major issue obviously but if it does at least we have SOME idea of spread patterns and government response (lack of it) based on H1N1. This could be one of those hunker down situations if it explodes.
 

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This virus was detected in 2003. There have been approx. 330 deaths since then from bird flu. That's 41 deaths per year.

There are 6 billion people on earth. You have a 41 in 6,000,000,000 chance of dying from this.

Everyone chill the F out, geez.
 

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lol...this guy has to be a troll.

Bayou man, do you know how many people a year die from just the plain ol' regular flu?
 

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This virus was detected in 2003. There have been approx. 330 deaths since then from bird flu. That's 41 deaths per year.

There are 6 billion people on earth. You have a 41 in 6,000,000,000 chance of dying from this.

Everyone chill the F out, geez.
lol...this guy has to be a troll.

Bayou man, do you know how many people a year die from just the plain ol' regular flu?
You're not grasping the potential for disaster. Yes, H5N1 hasn't killed a lot of people, and yes, regular flu is more widespread and dangerous. So far. The thing is, H5N1 is a bird flu; it is contagious among birds. Not humans. So far. It has jumped the species barrier repeatedly - something which scares the pants off anyone who knows virology, because that proves it's opportunistic and wildly mutating and adaptable, since bird flu viruses should not be able to live in the human body - but has never hit the right combination of mutations to become human to human transmissible. So far. Should that change, should H5N1 start passing from human to human like regular flu does, with its EXTREMELY high kill rate and the difficulties involved in treating bird flu, we're could be looking at a real life version of Stephen King's The Stand. The 1918 Spanish Flu - also a bird flu virus, but one that managed to become contagious among humans, albeit with a much much much lower lethality rate than H5N1 has - went world wide and killed millions. Should we get a H5N1 pandemic, the death toll could be in the billions, and be TEOTWAWKI.

But hey, it's not as if this were anything, you know, SERIOUS...

So far.
 

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You're not grasping the potential for disaster. Yes, H5N1 hasn't killed a lot of people, and yes, regular flu is more widespread and dangerous. So far. The thing is, H5N1 is a bird flu; it is contagious among birds. Not humans. So far. It has jumped the species barrier repeatedly - something which scares the pants off anyone who knows virology, because that proves it's opportunistic and wildly mutating and adaptable, since bird flu viruses should not be able to live in the human body - but has never hit the right combination of mutations to become human to human transmissible. So far. Should that change, should H5N1 start passing from human to human like regular flu does, with its EXTREMELY high kill rate and the difficulties involved in treating bird flu, we're could be looking at a real life version of Stephen King's The Stand. The 1918 Spanish Flu - also a bird flu virus, but one that managed to become contagious among humans, albeit with a much much much lower lethality rate than H5N1 has - went world wide and killed millions. Should we get a H5N1 pandemic, the death toll could be in the billions, and be TEOTWAWKI.

But hey, it's not as if this were anything, you know, SERIOUS...

So far.
You're technically right.
Technically is the key word here...with "potential", "so far", "could", "should" and, in the original poster message "I think". There are many other diseases -much more common and deadly I dare to say- that threat our well being, both in developed and underdeveloped countries.

I'm not saying that the threat have to be understimated...but between ignoring a threat and jumping on the chair at every notice of social/economical/health hazard worldwide there is an extremely wide middle ground. Maybe I'm wrong, but there seems to be a lot of people here that love crying "Wolf! Wolf!". It almost seems that they itch for a disaster to happen, and the original poster message seems to fall in this category. "Chill out" is indeed a sound advice - at least in my opinion.


Happy new year in advance (here is still afternoon)!
 

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I thought this was just the same bird/swine flu scare we just had. I notice in some posts H1N1 and H5N1..... What is the difference, is the H5N1 a more serious issue?
 

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If nothing else (to all you nay-sayers) look at the implications of this story;

A BUS DRIVER, i.e. someone who is in direct contact with large amounts of people every day, has contracted a potentially deadly disease, in a country with a HUGE population.

God forbid this disease turns into something transmitable from human to human and this same scenario plays out to it's worst. THAT'S what I got out of this story.
 

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If nothing else (to all you nay-sayers) look at the implications of this story;

A BUS DRIVER, i.e. someone who is in direct contact with large amounts of people every day, has contracted a potentially deadly disease, in a country with a HUGE population.

God forbid this disease turns into something transmitable from human to human and this same scenario plays out to it's worst. THAT'S what I got out of this story.

There are very few implications at the moment. The virus is very difficult to transmit from human to human. As I said before, between "ignoring a problem" and "jumping around terrified by every broken twig" there's lots of ground in the middle.
People can monitor those news and reflect on the possible outcomes without acting like sensationalist anchormen seeking attention. I'm all for preparedness, but for God' sake, with at least some aplomb. Crying that the end of times are coming everytime something happens in the world is hardly "preparedness". It's plain old paranoia.
 

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You're technically right.
Technically is the key word here...with "potential", "so far", "could", "should" and, in the original poster message "I think". There are many other diseases -much more common and deadly I dare to say- that threat our well being, both in developed and underdeveloped countries.

I'm not saying that the threat have to be understimated...but between ignoring a threat and jumping on the chair at every notice of social/economical/health hazard worldwide there is an extremely wide middle ground. Maybe I'm wrong, but there seems to be a lot of people here that love crying "Wolf! Wolf!". It almost seems that they itch for a disaster to happen, and the original poster message seems to fall in this category. "Chill out" is indeed a sound advice - at least in my opinion.


Happy new year in advance (here is still afternoon)!
Thanks for the New Year wishes! And you, too, are technically correct in that H5N1 hasn't become the ultimate disaster that we all fear. But it is an extremely widespread (among poultry) disease in constant flux, and more than others like Ebola, drug resistant TB, or flesh eating bacteria, H5N1 has the potential to suddenly become The Wolf. It's a wildcard, and you always need to watch out for wildcards because they can be game changers. In this particular case the bus driver's illness is worrisome because he reportedly had no contact with poultry, the usual infection route for H5N1 in humans, in either his personal or professional life. Hopefully that turns out to be wrong, because if it is not the most next most likely explanation is human to human transmission. And if there IS a strain of H5N1 out there that has managed to do that, however poorly, it is a serious danger. Because with the speed and extend of international travel existent today, the pandemic that starts in Asia on a Sunday will be in every nation on Earth by the following Saturday...
 

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This is why I avoid large crowds. Hell, I avoid people. I don't get sick because of this. The next major pandemic will happen and the human race will survive. We need to thin out the population anyway. And yes, I'm serious.
 

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if they announce that this has become contagious, who will get the vaccine?

my son had the H1N1 a few years ago, and it was kind of scary. many many days of flu symptoms and general awfulness, and on the morning we were going to take him to the doctor, his fever broke and make a full recovery.

im not sure i want to endure something like that again, but potentially lethal this time.
 

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What's noteworthy is his lack of contact with poultry and he didn't travel. That's where the red flag comes from. One potential scenario is that you have an airborne H5N1 strain in play. But there are other ways that he could have caught it too that doesn't involve a new strain. e.g. He could have shaken hands with an unsanitary neighbor who had been butchering a diseased bird. Ideally an epidemiologist comes in and tracks all this down. ...which is more of a challenge now that he's dead.

It's just one of those stories that needs watching.
 

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There are very few implications at the moment. The virus is very difficult to transmit from human to human. As I said before, between "ignoring a problem" and "jumping around terrified by every broken twig" there's lots of ground in the middle.
People can monitor those news and reflect on the possible outcomes without acting like sensationalist anchormen seeking attention. I'm all for preparedness, but for God' sake, with at least some aplomb. Crying that the end of times are coming everytime something happens in the world is hardly "preparedness". It's plain old paranoia.
Maybe you don't know the definition of the word 'implications'.

All I was pointing out is how easy it will be to spread worldwide like wildfire once it mutates to a transferable virus. Nothing I wrote simulated me 'jumping around terrified...'.

Whether you think spreading the word about this is "hardly preparedness" I disagree. Knowing this situation and the possibilities of how bad it can get makes me want to start doing a few other things in my preparing to help me and mine be able to hunker down and wait something like this out, like start stocking materials for a clean room in my house with an air filtration system and a few more NBC filters for the gas masks. Call me paranoid if you like.
 
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