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Preparing since 1972
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There are quite a few people here that have done them....Post your questions and get the responses...Alot of people here to help....:thumb:
 

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Tested in the Wilderness
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Has anyone built their own underground survival bunker, that can answer some questions for me??
There just Might be a few.

Maybe type bunker in search. Or better yet start here >

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=42447

And even look at some links I have put up and ask in the above thread and if you need privacy then send me a private message. Maybe some will answer from what they have read but some, very few, of us will answer from experience and actually building a good underground bunker.

I think everyone who dares call themselves a survivalist should have a bunker or at least the plans to build one.
Here are the plans I used > http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=42447&page=7
 

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Founder
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Container bunker

I just bought a house and am going to build a detached garage in a cement pad and want to put a 20' metal container under it for a bunker, have a door that comes up unside the garage. what do you guys think?
 

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I think if you are going to have it dug and have a garage built, you might as well have them make you a concrete bunker. For them to put the garage over a storage container, they will need footings that go lower than the container anyways, plus you will need the stones for irrigation.
It should actually cost you less to have a concrete bunker under your garage than put a container under it.
 

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I just bought a house and am going to build a detached garage in a cement pad and want to put a 20' metal container under it for a bunker, have a door that comes up unside the garage. what do you guys think?
There's a whole bunch of posts on these boards about either how much of a bad idea it is to bury a shipping container, or how much work is involved if you do want to bury one.

Basically, they're not designed for it, and won't last without a ton of work.
 

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i just figured it would be easier because it is almost plug and play, dig it, drop it on and build your dirt pad up and then lay ur concrete. Somthing like the old tanks and stuff like that ive seen in the other threads dont seem as structurally sound.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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lets just hope yours is more effective than the Maginot Line
 

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Fire/EMS
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http://www.disastershelters.net/

Burying a shipping container is a bad idea due to the structural shape. The flat surface does not take pressure well and will collapse if a large pressure is exerted (close bomb, nuclear blast). Using a cylindrical shaped shelter is better because the shape disperses the blast better, and the shape is stronger. Building a bunker is only worth it if you are going to make it worth while. There is no point in having a false sense of security by having a flimsy half quality box buried. A good one will cost at least 15K installed.

Don't forget about air quality. If you don't have proper ventilation then you will die of carbon monoxide poisoning. A good bunker will require an NBC filter built in. A gas mask is not good enough.

Also, building a shelter under a building is a bad idea. If i read your post right, you intend to maybe bury it under your garage?
If you need to get into your bunker, there is a good chance everything above ground is going to be leveled. You dont want to survive a blast, and then find yourself trapped inside the bunker because the door wont open up. Thats a horrible way to go.

Make sure your bunker is at least 1 1/4 farther away from the height of the tallest nearby building. Some builders will include high powered jacks capable of lifting 20 tons or more off the door, but its still a good bet to keep your shelter clear.

Finally, dont forget about water.Dont bury your shelter in a place where water collects during rainstorms Even next to an underground pipe could cause massive water intake. Your filter could be destroyed if it is soaked with water.

Good luck -Bighead
 

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I would not recommend using a shipping container (in the military, referred to as a “milvan,” or by the civilian term “conex”) to construct a shelter of any type. I saw this done in two different ways during my last tour in Iraq, and both had major faults. These methods were used, despite the faults, due to the benefit of expediency. Both were quick to construct to provide some protection, but they didn’t last long.

1. Above Ground: In this method, a milvan is simply set on a level piece of ground, and dirt and sand are piled on three sides and on top of the milvan. Since dirt and sand were easy to come buy (just dig it up on one side of the FOB), it wasn’t much of an issue. The goal was to end up with at least three feet of sand/dirt on top of the milvan. (A typical “scud bunker” standard was to have at least two layers of sand bags on top of an eight inch reinforced concrete shelter template. Since there was no concrete understructure, you have to compensate by adding more sand/dirt.). Alternately, a milvan was surrounded by filled “Hesco” Barriers, and small filled “Hesco’s” or filled sandbags were placed on top. Afterward, a concrete T-Wall, a section of “Hesco” Barrier, or a mound of dirt/sand was placed in front of the door to provide front cover. This method was quick to finish, but had draw backs. First, there was no ventilation or drainage except for the door. So if any water got in the container, it was hard to get out, and would grow mold and mildew. The lack of ventilation made the container feel claustrophobic and was very hot in the summer. However, the biggest drawback was the sand/dirt pile. After a short while, gravity, wind erosion, and water erosion would make the layer of dirt on the top thin out, and eventually slide outwards, creating an unprotected ring around the top of the container, and an under protected ceiling. Obviously, for this to remain a viable shelter, it required a lot of maintenance.

2. Below Ground: This method is pretty self explanatory. Dig hole, insert container, cover with dirt you excavated for the hole. Top cover should end up being at least three feet thick, with the top of the container being at least one foot below ground level. This method shares the same disadvantage that the top cover eventually would erode away, but was easier to maintain – just dump more dirt on top and spread around. However, the front cover was the biggest problem. If nothing was placed in front of the edge of the top of the container, dirt would erode away, creating an unprotected shelf, and the dirt would pile up in front of the door, preventing it from either opening or closing. To prevent this, some 2 x 4’s were set in the ground to create a lip. Also, you have to create a ramp or steps from ground level down to the doors. These were usually just some rigged 2 x 4 set up. The biggest detriments, however, again, were lack of ventilation and drainage. Being buried, the containers tended to retain water during the rainy season. Also, the buried containers were more likely to rust. Eventually, the ceilings would weaken and begin to sag. This obviously would indicate a lack of strength and protection.

Ironically, the impetus to have these “bunkers” removed was fiscal. The U.S. Army doesn’t actually own that many milvans. Most in the Army inventory are long term leases, and the Army needed the containers back, because they paying late fees for them.

Hope this entirely too long post helps yall out some.
 

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Fun Guy
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There's a whole bunch of posts on these boards about either how much of a bad idea it is to bury a shipping container, or how much work is involved if you do want to bury one.

Basically, they're not designed for it, and won't last without a ton of work.
Totally true. I was about to make an attempt with a container when a friend pointed me in the right direction.

Fiberglass is far superior in many ways.
 
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