Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,855 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I didn't want to steal Mayhaw's thread on spices, so I thought I'd start one here. I just had a quick look in my pantry, and saw a lot of our stuff comes from Bulk Barn...dried peas and beans, lentils, salt and sugar are only a few. Is Bulk Barn just a Canadian store? Do those of you in other countries have something comparable?

Bulk Barn has lots of bins, and you can buy the amount you want, not what the manufacturers think you need. Three doggie biscuits? No problem. Two teaspoons of a certain spice? Go ahead. A 15 lb bag of sea salt? Sure you can. I love these places.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
I didn't want to steal Mayhaw's thread on spices, so I thought I'd start one here. I just had a quick look in my pantry, and saw a lot of our stuff comes from Bulk Barn...dried peas and beans, lentils, salt and sugar are only a few. Is Bulk Barn just a Canadian store? Do those of you in other countries have something comparable?

Bulk Barn has lots of bins, and you can buy the amount you want, not what the manufacturers think you need. Three doggie biscuits? No problem. Two teaspoons of a certain spice? Go ahead. A 15 lb bag of sea salt? Sure you can. I love these places.

We go every week for at least something. Cant say I have ever bought anything truly "bulk" there though, but they do seem to have even harder to find stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,855 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We go every week for at least something. Cant say I have ever bought anything truly "bulk" there though, but they do seem to have even harder to find stuff.
I agree; we don't buy 'bulk' as much as we buy smaller amounts of things. I must say, though, that they have a 12-bean mix (or maybe 15 beans, I'm not too sure right now) which costs over $1, so I just gather up a bunch of different beans ( at anywhere from $ .24- $.45 each), buy them like that, then come home and throw them all together. Voila! Soup mix. I store THAT in glass gallon- jars. I've even made baked beans with the mix...yummy.

The only time our dogs get a 'treat' is when we go to BB; they wait (not s) patiently in the car and when we come out, they get a biccie. (that's why 3 dog biscuits are always in or order).

I even sent DD's family in Ontario a gift certificate from BB in their Christmas box. She loved it, too.
 

·
Prepared Gourmet
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
I drive 1000 miles (each way) every few weeks to go to Bulk Barn! I buy a lot of things there, depending on what I need at the time.

Last trip (a week ago) I bought about 10 lbs each of several different flours (ones I had not seen around here), chocolate (they have many kinds, but the best is Callabaut imho), and about 30 lbs. of fruitcake fruit (which I keep all year round in a LARGE jar, several gallons big, soaking in a bottle each of brandy and rum).

I can never get fruitcake fruit here unless it is the night before Christmas it seems - and this method is a great way to preserve any fruit.

My fruitcakes are so soaked in booze that they will easily keep on the counter for 10 years without spoiling (if you can resist eating them)! :) And, after I add a LOT of nuts, real butter, eggs, etc., although they are a bit calorific, they ARE nutritious too.

Most Americans just don't seem to have a clue what good fruitcake tastes like, sad to say, which is why I don't think they care if the supermarkets stock the ingredients regularly. I think it is really true they think they are dry and only good for throwing. But, can you imagine having access to this kind of fortifying treat 10 years after SHTF? Those who can't or don't do fruitcake, and/or at least stock dried fruit in booze, will be missing out on a lot!

But, sorry .. digressed there .. nope, as far as I know, there is no equivalent to Bulk Barn anywhere near where I live in NC. I never saw any when I lived in TX either, and I know my sister-in-law in CT has never seen one there - so I doubt there are any in the US. Aren't they a subsidiary of Loblaws (not a US store as far as I know, although the PC brand sometimes seems to sneak down here, mostly in frozen stuff I think).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,804 Posts
I drive 1000 miles (each way) every few weeks to go to Bulk Barn! I buy a lot of things there, depending on what I need at the time.

Last trip (a week ago) I bought about 10 lbs each of several different flours (ones I had not seen around here), chocolate (they have many kinds, but the best is Callabaut imho), and about 30 lbs. of fruitcake fruit (which I keep all year round in a LARGE jar, several gallons big, soaking in a bottle each of brandy and rum).

I can never get fruitcake fruit here unless it is the night before Christmas it seems - and this method is a great way to preserve any fruit.

My fruitcakes are so soaked in booze that they will easily keep on the counter for 10 years without spoiling (if you can resist eating them)! :) And, after I add a LOT of nuts, real butter, eggs, etc., although they are a bit calorific, they ARE nutritious too.

Most Americans just don't seem to have a clue what good fruitcake tastes like, sad to say, which is why I don't think they care if the supermarkets stock the ingredients regularly. I think it is really true they think they are dry and only good for throwing. But, can you imagine having access to this kind of fortifying treat 10 years after SHTF? Those who can't or don't do fruitcake, and/or at least stock dried fruit in booze, will be missing out on a lot!

But, sorry .. digressed there .. nope, as far as I know, there is no equivalent to Bulk Barn anywhere near where I live in NC. I never saw any when I lived in TX either, and I know my sister-in-law in CT has never seen one there - so I doubt there are any in the US. Aren't they a subsidiary of Loblaws (not a US store as far as I know, although the PC brand sometimes seems to sneak down here, mostly in frozen stuff I think).
No, none here either.
I agree wholeheartedly about fruitcake. I thought they'd be a great survival food too but it's hard to find the ingredients here. I love it if it doesn't have fruit rinds in it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
I must say, though, that they have a 12-bean mix (or maybe 15 beans, I'm not too sure right now) which costs over $1, so I just gather up a bunch of different beans ( at anywhere from $ .24- $.45 each), buy them like that, then come home and throw them all together. Voila! Soup mix. I store THAT in glass gallon- jars. I've even made baked beans with the mix...yummy.

We received our Pressure Canner yesterday, so I think a trip to the Bulk Barn, and some soup cooking is in order.

We canned Spaghetti souce the night we got it, and everything except the meat, and tomatoes came from last years garden (vegetables) and BB ( spices lol )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
I drive 1000 miles (each way) every few weeks to go to Bulk Barn! I buy a lot of things there, depending on what I need at the time.

Last trip (a week ago) I bought about 10 lbs each of several different flours (ones I had not seen around here), chocolate (they have many kinds, but the best is Callabaut imho), and about 30 lbs. of fruitcake fruit (which I keep all year round in a LARGE jar, several gallons big, soaking in a bottle each of brandy and rum).

I can never get fruitcake fruit here unless it is the night before Christmas it seems - and this method is a great way to preserve any fruit.

My fruitcakes are so soaked in booze that they will easily keep on the counter for 10 years without spoiling (if you can resist eating them)! :) And, after I add a LOT of nuts, real butter, eggs, etc., although they are a bit calorific, they ARE nutritious too.

Most Americans just don't seem to have a clue what good fruitcake tastes like, sad to say, which is why I don't think they care if the supermarkets stock the ingredients regularly. I think it is really true they think they are dry and only good for throwing. But, can you imagine having access to this kind of fortifying treat 10 years after SHTF? Those who can't or don't do fruitcake, and/or at least stock dried fruit in booze, will be missing out on a lot!

But, sorry .. digressed there .. nope, as far as I know, there is no equivalent to Bulk Barn anywhere near where I live in NC. I never saw any when I lived in TX either, and I know my sister-in-law in CT has never seen one there - so I doubt there are any in the US. Aren't they a subsidiary of Loblaws (not a US store as far as I know, although the PC brand sometimes seems to sneak down here, mostly in frozen stuff I think).
Would you be willing to share a good recipe for fruit cake? Store bought sucks, and I have NO IDEA how to make this ( I know I'm SAD lol)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
Fruitcake -- sorry I don't have my grandmother's recipe. However, she did start with an applesauce spice cake and added pecans, candied fruit, currants, raisins. Soaked in brandy, the only time alcohol was allowed in her house. One tip I remember -- before you add the fruits and nuts, dredge them in some flour -- keeps them dispersed. She baked them in iron skillets and loaf pans lined with brown paper sacks. Which I wouldn't use these days, maybe parchment paper instead.
 

·
Prepared Gourmet
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
Would you be willing to share a good recipe for fruit cake? Store bought sucks, and I have NO IDEA how to make this ( I know I'm SAD lol)
Oh dear .. I would have to go find a recipe that looks like mine. Yes, I would be very happy to share one but to tell the truth, I have been cooking so long now that I rarely actually follow one any more .. I go by 'feel' and taste. I learned, more by osmosis (being present in the kitchen, not by being taught, per se), at my mother's knee, so to speak, to make dark fruitcake. I think, over the years, I have probably modified the original recipe though. I know I add even more booze than Mom did. :) There are many out on the net and all can be adapted to your likes if you have some basic cooking skills/intuitive sense. Google 'rich dark fruitcake' and try out a small recipe to see what suits you, but don't be afraid to adjust it a bit to suit your particular likes and dislikes.

My mother's recipe originally came from Joy of Cooking I believe, the older version. She is gone now but I have the book and that page is all stained with the 'fruits' of her labour- literally. :) Unfortunately, I put the book away somewhere (we are remodelling) and can't get at it fast right now.

She was American, my father Welsh .. so I think she started making them to make it feel like 'home' for him at Christmas. We also then lived in Canada, which follows many British traditions even to this day. Christmas cakes were on everyone's table during the holidays. And I think it was only a few years ago (relatively speaking) that Canadian brides began to choose more 'American style' wedding cakes. I made my own wedding cake, and my (American) brother's too .. and they were always fruitcake, dark, rich, liqueur'd up. Shocked a lot of Americans at my brother's wedding but they liked it once they tried it.

So, since I don't really have an exact recipe, and I don't know your level of baking experience, I will just try to give you a bit of insight into 'my' process.

This is a labour of love. I make a large amount, and it can take 2 days to produce the cakes ready to begin the 'ripening' process.

You can begin months before by soaking the fruit (any mixture you like - I use raisins, currants, citron, and mixed diced fruitcake fruit - not the kind with rinds - and sometimes the whole cherries). Some recipes call for apricots and dates too. Soak them in whatever booze you like - I use rum and brandy as I said, but some, who like to use a Jamaican 'black cake' type recipe (which is very similar to mine in many respects) may want to add port. Or, you can just decide to make cake tomorrow and forget soaking the fruit in advance.

Place all your fruit and nuts (I use almonds and pecans, (more, at least 2 pounds of the latter because I love them) in a LARGE bowl - mine is restaurant size stainless, and almost full to the top when I make this cake. Add a cup or two of booze (I use the soaking 'liquid'). Add a cup or so of dark grape juice - used to darken the cake. If you prefer a lighter version, don't add it or use a light grape juice. Let this mixture soak at least overnight, and stir every once in a while to ensure all the ingredients are coated well.

The next morning add a cup or two of flour to the bowl to coat the fruit/nut mixture. This coating helps the fruit to 'float' in the cake mixture so it won't all fall to the bottom. Let sit while you make the 'carrier' cake mixture.

The cake part is just a way to bind the fruit together so there will be a lot more fruit/nuts than cake. In my recipe, it is made up of eggs, butter, sugar (I usually use all brown sugar), spices, more booze and a bit of flour. Some people use more leavenings (baking soda and powder) but I generally only rely on the leavening power of egg whites. My cakes rise but not a lot. I usually use a dozen eggs, separated, and make a basic batter by first mixing the brown sugar with the butter (like a pound cake - a pound of each generally) and beating till 'light'. Add the egg yolks and continue beating till 'fluffy'.

I can usually do this first part with my Kitchen Aid stand mixer. You will end up mixing things by hand though - and I mean that literally - when you do the final fruit mixing so dress appropriately and get ready to play in the muck. It is fun actually - my favorite part. I get up to my elbows in deliciousness (which I then get to lick off, of course). :)

Put flour (about 4-5 cups for my standard large quantity - which often produces about 8 cakes, probably about 40 lbs of cake in total, although I have never weighed them) in a second bowl. This flour is additional to the flour already on the fruit. Add the spices - your choice of mix again, but I use cinnamon, mace, nutmeg and cloves usually. And a bit of salt (probably a teaspoon or two), and vanilla extract - again the real kind - a couple of teaspoons full at least. If you are using baking soda and powder, add them to this dry mixture.

In a third mixing bowl, beat the egg whites till stiff but not dry.

Then the real fun begins. Add the butter/sugar/egg mixture to the fruit/nut mixture. Add the egg whites carefully (folding in) to the resulting fruit/butter mixture. Add the flour in batches to that fruit/nut/butter/sugar mixture, alternately adding more booze or juice to keep it all liquid enough to allow you to keep mixing it (by hand). It will be very sticky, heavy and thick.

Make sure you taste a little bit to make sure you like the combo and adjust the spices, etc. as necessary.

To be authentic to my family's tradition (which somehow, for me, makes them taste better, not to mention it brings back memories for me), I save all my paper bags - the heavy ones, which, thanks to the so-called 'environmental consciousness' these days, are harder and harder to find :( - and cut them all to fit the pans (bottoms and sides, in one or more pieces). 'Grease' the papers (the easiest way is to use the butter wrappers from the butter you use for the recipe), on both sides till they are 'translucent'. I use any size pan I can find - from wedding cake sizes to small 'bread' pans, round, square, rectangular. You can choose to line your pans with parchment if you prefer but you really do need to line them so they will slip out easily after baking and the paper can be peeled off, leaving a relatively smooth surface.

Place all the cakes in the oven, at about 275 degrees (F). I place a pan of water on the bottom rack to ensure they stay as moist as possible. These cakes take hours (not minutes) to bake, but I would check the smaller ones after about 1 1/2 - 2 hours. You will smell the aroma and know when to start checking, if you have any experience baking at all. Remove if done (you know the old toothpick trick to check this) and place on a rack to cool. Remove from the pans when they have cooled for 5-10 minutes and continue cooling, etc. Basic baking 101 stuff.

Once cool, I pour a bit more booze over the tops (or you can put holes in the cake and do it that way), wrap the cakes individually in well booze soaked cheesecloth and again, tightly, in foil. Check them every few days for the first couple of weeks and add a bit more booze. Check them every few weeks for the first few months, adding more booze each time. After that, they are usually good to go. If you can hold off eating them for a year, add a bit more booze every 6 months-1 year if you want/need to. Cut in very small pieces - or you will be drunk before teatime! :) For use at Christmas, it is best to make by early October, at a minimum.

Sorry this is so long (and boring). Was thinking through it all as I typed. Making fruitcake is a big job but it is very satisfying to have done it and know you have this delicious stuff stashed away. I still maintain it is nutritious too! And .. no calories at all .. umm well .. a few.

Since I usually don't really 'measure' anything or follow a recipe any more, I have miscalculated a couple of times on the amount of batter to add to the fruit. In other words, made a bit too little batter for the amount of fruit. You won't know that till you go to cut it. The longer it sits, and the more booze that is added, over time it will hold together better. However, even if it falls apart when you cut it, it is still delicious so don't throw it away in disgust or be afraid to experiment again. It is a very 'forgiving' cake/process.

If making this for kids, it will not last as long because the booze is the real preservative and you will want to use more grape juice than booze. You can however freeze it and it will last years without the booze, but after shtf you may not have that ability. Perhaps you could make without so much booze to start, freeze it till shtf, and then add booze after it thaws - maybe the kids will be older then and it won't be such a crime to feed them the 'real stuff'. :)

By the way, I am NOT an alcoholic. I rarely drink and when I do it is just wine. But, I do like a bit of this stuff, at least at Christmas. If made right though, I do feel a bit heady after a slice or two. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
68,758 Posts
Would you be willing to share a good recipe for fruit cake? Store bought sucks, and I have NO IDEA how to make this ( I know I'm SAD lol)
The net is full of great fruitcake recipes. I have never tried to make it yet, but I've had some good ones before and it's definately something worth learning. The fruits are hard to find in local stores, but bulkfoods.com has them. Many years back a lot of cities had bulk food stores. Ours closed long ago. I guess they did in a lot of other places from what I can tell from the replies here. It's a shame because they're a really good business model. Maybe the public is too apprehensive about foods that can be accessed by others. I buy in bulk regularly from our local health food store though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
Oh dear .. I would have to go find a recipe that looks like mine. Yes, I would be very happy to share one but to tell the truth, I have been cooking so long now that I rarely actually follow one any more .. I go by 'feel' and taste. I learned, more by osmosis (being present in the kitchen, not by being taught, per se), at my mother's knee, so to speak, to make dark fruitcake. I think, over the years, I have probably modified the original recipe though. I know I add even more booze than Mom did. :) There are many out on the net and all can be adapted to your likes if you have some basic cooking skills/intuitive sense. Google 'rich dark fruitcake' and try out a small recipe to see what suits you, but don't be afraid to adjust it a bit to suit your particular likes and dislikes.

My mother's recipe originally came from Joy of Cooking I believe, the older version. She is gone now but I have the book and that page is all stained with the 'fruits' of her labour- literally. :) Unfortunately, I put the book away somewhere (we are remodelling) and can't get at it fast right now.

She was American, my father Welsh .. so I think she started making them to make it feel like 'home' for him at Christmas. We also then lived in Canada, which follows many British traditions even to this day. Christmas cakes were on everyone's table during the holidays. And I think it was only a few years ago (relatively speaking) that Canadian brides began to choose more 'American style' wedding cakes. I made my own wedding cake, and my (American) brother's too .. and they were always fruitcake, dark, rich, liqueur'd up. Shocked a lot of Americans at my brother's wedding but they liked it once they tried it.

So, since I don't really have an exact recipe, and I don't know your level of baking experience, I will just try to give you a bit of insight into 'my' process.

This is a labour of love. I make a large amount, and it can take 2 days to produce the cakes ready to begin the 'ripening' process.

You can begin months before by soaking the fruit (any mixture you like - I use raisins, currants, citron, and mixed diced fruitcake fruit - not the kind with rinds - and sometimes the whole cherries). Some recipes call for apricots and dates too. Soak them in whatever booze you like - I use rum and brandy as I said, but some, who like to use a Jamaican 'black cake' type recipe (which is very similar to mine in many respects) may want to add port. Or, you can just decide to make cake tomorrow and forget soaking the fruit in advance.

Place all your fruit and nuts (I use almonds and pecans, (more, at least 2 pounds of the latter because I love them) in a LARGE bowl - mine is restaurant size stainless, and almost full to the top when I make this cake. Add a cup or two of booze (I use the soaking 'liquid'). Add a cup or so of dark grape juice - used to darken the cake. If you prefer a lighter version, don't add it or use a light grape juice. Let this mixture soak at least overnight, and stir every once in a while to ensure all the ingredients are coated well.

The next morning add a cup or two of flour to the bowl to coat the fruit/nut mixture. This coating helps the fruit to 'float' in the cake mixture so it won't all fall to the bottom. Let sit while you make the 'carrier' cake mixture.

The cake part is just a way to bind the fruit together so there will be a lot more fruit/nuts than cake. In my recipe, it is made up of eggs, butter, sugar (I usually use all brown sugar), spices, more booze and a bit of flour. Some people use more leavenings (baking soda and powder) but I generally only rely on the leavening power of egg whites. My cakes rise but not a lot. I usually use a dozen eggs, separated, and make a basic batter by first mixing the brown sugar with the butter (like a pound cake - a pound of each generally) and beating till 'light'. Add the egg yolks and continue beating till 'fluffy'.

I can usually do this first part with my Kitchen Aid stand mixer. You will end up mixing things by hand though - and I mean that literally - when you do the final fruit mixing so dress appropriately and get ready to play in the muck. It is fun actually - my favorite part. I get up to my elbows in deliciousness (which I then get to lick off, of course). :)

Put flour (about 4-5 cups for my standard large quantity - which often produces about 8 cakes, probably about 40 lbs of cake in total, although I have never weighed them) in a second bowl. This flour is additional to the flour already on the fruit. Add the spices - your choice of mix again, but I use cinnamon, mace, nutmeg and cloves usually. And a bit of salt (probably a teaspoon or two), and vanilla extract - again the real kind - a couple of teaspoons full at least. If you are using baking soda and powder, add them to this dry mixture.

In a third mixing bowl, beat the egg whites till stiff but not dry.

Then the real fun begins. Add the butter/sugar/egg mixture to the fruit/nut mixture. Add the egg whites carefully (folding in) to the resulting fruit/butter mixture. Add the flour in batches to that fruit/nut/butter/sugar mixture, alternately adding more booze or juice to keep it all liquid enough to allow you to keep mixing it (by hand). It will be very sticky, heavy and thick.

Make sure you taste a little bit to make sure you like the combo and adjust the spices, etc. as necessary.

To be authentic to my family's tradition (which somehow, for me, makes them taste better, not to mention it brings back memories for me), I save all my paper bags - the heavy ones, which, thanks to the so-called 'environmental consciousness' these days, are harder and harder to find :( - and cut them all to fit the pans (bottoms and sides, in one or more pieces). 'Grease' the papers (the easiest way is to use the butter wrappers from the butter you use for the recipe), on both sides till they are 'translucent'. I use any size pan I can find - from wedding cake sizes to small 'bread' pans, round, square, rectangular. You can choose to line your pans with parchment if you prefer but you really do need to line them so they will slip out easily after baking and the paper can be peeled off, leaving a relatively smooth surface.

Place all the cakes in the oven, at about 275 degrees (F). I place a pan of water on the bottom rack to ensure they stay as moist as possible. These cakes take hours (not minutes) to bake, but I would check the smaller ones after about 1 1/2 - 2 hours. You will smell the aroma and know when to start checking, if you have any experience baking at all. Remove if done (you know the old toothpick trick to check this) and place on a rack to cool. Remove from the pans when they have cooled for 5-10 minutes and continue cooling, etc. Basic baking 101 stuff.

Once cool, I pour a bit more booze over the tops (or you can put holes in the cake and do it that way), wrap the cakes individually in well booze soaked cheesecloth and again, tightly, in foil. Check them every few days for the first couple of weeks and add a bit more booze. Check them every few weeks for the first few months, adding more booze each time. After that, they are usually good to go. If you can hold off eating them for a year, add a bit more booze every 6 months-1 year if you want/need to. Cut in very small pieces - or you will be drunk before teatime! :) For use at Christmas, it is best to make by early October, at a minimum.

Sorry this is so long (and boring). Was thinking through it all as I typed. Making fruitcake is a big job but it is very satisfying to have done it and know you have this delicious stuff stashed away. I still maintain it is nutritious too! And .. no calories at all .. umm well .. a few.

Since I usually don't really 'measure' anything or follow a recipe any more, I have miscalculated a couple of times on the amount of batter to add to the fruit. In other words, made a bit too little batter for the amount of fruit. You won't know that till you go to cut it. The longer it sits, and the more booze that is added, over time it will hold together better. However, even if it falls apart when you cut it, it is still delicious so don't throw it away in disgust or be afraid to experiment again. It is a very 'forgiving' cake/process.

If making this for kids, it will not last as long because the booze is the real preservative and you will want to use more grape juice than booze. You can however freeze it and it will last years without the booze, but after shtf you may not have that ability. Perhaps you could make without so much booze to start, freeze it till shtf, and then add booze after it thaws - maybe the kids will be older then and it won't be such a crime to feed them the 'real stuff'. :)

By the way, I am NOT an alcoholic. I rarely drink and when I do it is just wine. But, I do like a bit of this stuff, at least at Christmas. If made right though, I do feel a bit heady after a slice or two. :)
Great, this is perfect. Thank you so much. I'm no wizard in the kitchen but i enjoy cooking ( supper), and the wife enjoys baking (goodies), and she used to have a cake decorating business ( no fruit cake though lol ). So together with a recipee i find, and your instructions and methode I think we will be fine.


I believe my wife, has an old copy of "joy of cooking" also from her mother or grandmother, but i never noticed a fruitcake recipe. I will most certainly be looking now, and probably having a DOHH moment hahaah.

Thanks for all the time you spent on this fantastic reply, and for all the little nuggets of kitchen gold I found in your post. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
The net is full of great fruitcake recipes. I have never tried to make it yet, but I've had some good ones before and it's definately something worth learning. The fruits are hard to find in local stores, but bulkfoods.com has them. Many years back a lot of cities had bulk food stores. Ours closed long ago. I guess they did in a lot of other places from what I can tell from the replies here. It's a shame because they're a really good business model. Maybe the public is too apprehensive about foods that can be accessed by others. I buy in bulk regularly from our local health food store though.
I think it has more to do with todays generation having either failed home economics ( because they view it as a bobo class) OR having never taken the class ( because the schools dont find it important).

No one cooks or bakes anymore, its a dying art. Its so much easier if they buy pre-cooked, and packaged suppers, and boxes of cookies or cake for dessert.

The younger generation doesnt appreciate the time and effort, and GREAT TAST of a home cooked meal.

When I was young, say 2 - 5 i stayed days with my grandma and grandpa. They being Greek, Grandpa would go to work, and grandma would stay home, and would bring me shopping for fresh ingrediants for the nights meal.

We would then spend sometimes all afternoon together cleaning vegetables, and making bread ( the old fashioned way, rising under the covers on the bed lol) and generaly spend a wonderfull afternoon preparing for when grandpa got back.

Then my parents would arrive to pick me up, and we would usually ALL spend a few hours together, eat, talk, etc.. as a FAMILY.

These things are gone from todays society in my opinion!!
 

·
Prepared Gourmet
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
Ronin, you are welcome. I hope fruitcake becomes a family favorite for you all.

2 corrections to my post. I noticed on re-reading that I said add the vanilla to the dry mixture .. oops, nope .. add to the butter/sugar/yolks mixture or wait till that is blended with the fruit (since it is wet). And I see I also completely forgot to tell you to fill the cake pans about 2/3rds full.

Good luck. If I ever find my cookbooks again (soon, I hope) I will send you a PM if I find the original recipe.

And you are so right about today's 'cooks' - why they don't cook and/or don't know how to cook. It is sad imho. Especially sad when I have to tell the grocery cashiers what vegetable/herb/ingredient I am buying so they can find the code and punch it in. They don't have a clue these days.

But there could be hope for the younger ones yet .. I nearly failed home ec myself because I hated to follow recipes (lol .. could you tell by my post above?) but I can now cater a wedding for 200 alone. My daughter refused to 'learn' to cook when she was a youngster (and given how many meals I made that she would not eat and demanded be replaced by Kraft dinner, the following surprised me). Then, a few years ago, she began calling occasionally and asking how to make what she now says are her favorite meals that I made when she was young. I always just described the process, never gave her a recipe per se, and then suggested some variations on the theme .. and she can now cook rather nicely and seems to appreciate the 'nutrition' and design elements necessary to make an appetizing dinner too. We never ate fried foods .. always ate pretty healthily .. and I firmly believe in much colour on a plate. Somehow she learned too by osmosis, as I must have done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
Ronin, you are welcome. I hope fruitcake becomes a family favorite for you all.

2 corrections to my post. I noticed on re-reading that I said add the vanilla to the dry mixture .. oops, nope .. add to the butter/sugar/yolks mixture or wait till that is blended with the fruit (since it is wet). And I see I also completely forgot to tell you to fill the cake pans about 2/3rds full.

Good luck. If I ever find my cookbooks again (soon, I hope) I will send you a PM if I find the original recipe.

And you are so right about today's 'cooks' - why they don't cook and/or don't know how to cook. It is sad imho. Especially sad when I have to tell the grocery cashiers what vegetable/herb/ingredient I am buying so they can find the code and punch it in. They don't have a clue these days.

But there could be hope for the younger ones yet .. I nearly failed home ec myself because I hated to follow recipes (lol .. could you tell by my post above?) but I can now cater a wedding for 200 alone. My daughter refused to 'learn' to cook when she was a youngster (and given how many meals I made that she would not eat and demanded be replaced by Kraft dinner, the following surprised me). Then, a few years ago, she began calling occasionally and asking how to make what she now says are her favorite meals that I made when she was young. I always just described the process, never gave her a recipe per se, and then suggested some variations on the theme .. and she can now cook rather nicely and seems to appreciate the 'nutrition' and design elements necessary to make an appetizing dinner too. We never ate fried foods .. always ate pretty healthily .. and I firmly believe in much colour on a plate. Somehow she learned too by osmosis, as I must have done.
Thanks for the updated info!!

Thats a great story, and indeed shows a ray of hope. With obecity on the rise, as well as high blood pressure, cholesterol, heart disease etc... we ALL need to be eating healthier, and in my opinion, that starts by cooking fresh, healthy food AT HOME.

Having a Garden, and some canning experiance, can lead to greater self-reliance also. Which we should also ALL be doing.

Anyways thanks for all your help!! :)
 

·
Prepared Gourmet
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
Thanks for the updated info!!

Thats a great story, and indeed shows a ray of hope. With obecity on the rise, as well as high blood pressure, cholesterol, heart disease etc... we ALL need to be eating healthier, and in my opinion, that starts by cooking fresh, healthy food AT HOME.

Having a Garden, and some canning experiance, can lead to greater self-reliance also. Which we should also ALL be doing.

Anyways thanks for all your help!! :)
I heartily agree, especially on the gardening and canning points. The courage to try those, though maybe not the actual recipes again, were also, for me, learned from my mom actually doing those things when I was a child.

She died over 20 years ago now. My father lived alone in the house for years after that till he had to move to a retirement home. Last fall I had to finally clear out the house so it could be sold. In the basement storage 'cubby hole', on some shelves between the joists on the wall below the stairs, I found jar after jar of jams she had made. My father was unable to go down the stairs for a few years before he left, so he had not eaten them and had forgotten they were there. Some might still have been edible (they looked in good and still colourful shape) but I sorrowfully threw them out just in case they weren't. Most were in unattractive 'recycled' jars, but I did keep one or two (emptied) which were lovely old heavy glass. I intend to reuse them in her memory, this summer, with fruits from my own garden.

I also tried to set those examples for my daughter so maybe, just maybe, when she gets to the stage where she has a bit of land, she will also try those too. :) Big city rental apartments without balconies, and the 'fast lifestyle' which seems to accompany that kind of environment, don't 'inspire' gardening for most youngsters it seems, and I can see why not.

Anyway .. my apologies to Grandma for diverting this thread.

Take your kids to Bulk Barn everyone! Teach them what is in the many many bins and let them help scoop up the ingredients so they retain interest ... and then take them home and point out what you are using from the items just bought, as you cook up something different and delicious. Also .. take your kids (after their naps, please!:) ) to the grocery store - or even better, to Farm Boy or Whole Foods or some veggie stand in the country and let them taste the difference between parsley and cilantro, see and smell and feel the differences between fennel and celery, etc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
68,758 Posts
I think it has more to do with todays generation having either failed home economics ( because they view it as a bobo class) OR having never taken the class ( because the schools dont find it important).

No one cooks or bakes anymore, its a dying art. Its so much easier if they buy pre-cooked, and packaged suppers, and boxes of cookies or cake for dessert.

The younger generation doesnt appreciate the time and effort, and GREAT TAST of a home cooked meal.

When I was young, say 2 - 5 i stayed days with my grandma and grandpa. They being Greek, Grandpa would go to work, and grandma would stay home, and would bring me shopping for fresh ingrediants for the nights meal.

We would then spend sometimes all afternoon together cleaning vegetables, and making bread ( the old fashioned way, rising under the covers on the bed lol) and generaly spend a wonderfull afternoon preparing for when grandpa got back.

Then my parents would arrive to pick me up, and we would usually ALL spend a few hours together, eat, talk, etc.. as a FAMILY.

These things are gone from todays society in my opinion!!
Sadly, I think you're right. Back when I was in school, none of the schools I went to even offered home economics. And if one had, I probably wouldn't have taken it. I can't believe that so many people can't cook! To me, that's the most basic of all life's skills. If one can't even feed themselves, they aren't much of a person.

My grandparents were like that. Grew much of their food. Grandma cooked everything from scratch. And a meal was a family event, not like today's grab something and go. Even when I was a kid, my mom actually cooked. Not always 100% from scratch like her mom, but mostly so. We baked bread together and she taught me a lot of the things that lead me to have an interest in cooking.

Even in the supermarket, I can't believe the number of people who don't recognize "food" unless it has a brand name on it somewhere. The cashiers don't know a beet from a banana, and everyone's carts contain nothing but boxed or canned foods.
 

·
Knocked Down But Up Again
Joined
·
5,579 Posts
Stick your food in plastic bags and freeze it over the weekend, and you'll likely have put an end to your bug problem. I got that information from these boards...I've never had bugs in my flour before. Is it because I keep all of my food in food-grade plastic storage containers? I'm not sure, but I've never had a bug problem before.

I know!! It must be because even bugs are smart enough to stay out of a liberal state like Massachusetts. We could learn a lot from those bugs.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top