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Left the building
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CS, thanks for the video. I don't plan on bugging out when SHTF....but I still have BOB's. Fire is probably one of the few things that would drive us from our home. We're currently under strict burn bans here.....with all the cedars in this area, they're drier than I've ever seen them. It's dry as a powder house. One spark.

Make sure you have all your important documents ready to go. We also have all our business and other files on multiple sticks, along with our business software. All important documents. I actually keep copies of certain things off site.

My hat's off to the jobs the brave men/women do fighting these fires.
 

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Besides the BOBs, you need a priority list of "needs & wants" based on time and cartage available ..... you need organization of your supplies ..... family training and practice runs for bugging out ....... above all, plenty of common sense about when to bug out
 

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Banned
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CS, thanks for the video. I don't plan on bugging out when SHTF....but I still have BOB's. Fire is probably one of the few things that would drive us from our home. We're currently under strict burn bans here.....with all the cedars in this area, they're drier than I've ever seen them. It's dry as a powder house. One spark.

Make sure you have all your important documents ready to go. We also have all our business and other files on multiple sticks, along with our business software. All important documents. I actually keep copies of certain things off site.

My hat's off to the jobs the brave men/women do fighting these fires.
Yea the corn fields scare me when I drive by they look like tinder just waiting to go off.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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There are a great many reasons why people planning to bug in should also have a bug out plan just in case. I lived through one of them myself back in 2006.

I live in the desert where we don't get much rain and have never had a flood. Yet in 2006 we got washed off the map. The river had already jumped it's banks upstream and downstream of where I lived at the time, and was threatening to jump in my area. My house was in a valley downhill from the river that was half a mile away.

All the roads were under water, so I couldn't go into the city, I couldn't get out of town. I was literally cut off 100%. I ended up having to bug out to high ground in the desert.

I guess the moral of the story is that even the least likely catastrophes do happen. And sometimes there is absolutely no way to bug in. Because I had a backup plan, I was able to camp a few days in the desert with my doggies, spend the day target shooting, the nights sitting around a campfire, and essentially enjoying a "forced vacation".
 

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Renaissance Man
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Fire is my number 1 concern for bugging in. It's about the only thing I can't really be ready for. Small fires sure, but a fire like that... the only thing you can do is run, and run fast.

Az
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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All the more reason to own a heavy pickup and a very large trailer. Fill the tanks, hitch the trailer, and pack it at the first sign of trouble. Turn the key and drive to safety when a monster like this tops the ridge. Let the professional deal with fires like this.
 

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In a SHTF world their won't be anyone to put out the wildfires. Something to thing about when building a homestead in the "outback" and rural areas. I've a feeling soon there will be a cut back in firefighting due to cuts and costs. Reason being "you should have insurance" it's cheaper for the state to let them pay you for the loss then the cost of fighting the fire.
 

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See you in my Scope
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The fire came off the ridge and was across the field in less than 10 minutes. It was hard to breathe and see when it got there. A propane tank started venting and we were pulled out. When the tank vented, it shot a flame about 100' into the air. Pinkish-orange column of fire and loud too.
 

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The fire came off the ridge and was across the field in less than 10 minutes. It was hard to breathe and see when it got there. A propane tank started venting and we were pulled out. When the tank vented, it shot a flame about 100' into the air. Pinkish-orange column of fire and loud too.
I was gonna ask how long it took. That was some dramatic footage, CS.

I'll say it again, don't get your azz roasted out there! And good on ya for helping fight that beast! :thumb:
 

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In memory of Rokitdog
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Only a nuke strike at the nearby AFB will make me bug out as long as my dad is alive! Otherwise not much in the way of natual disasters will affect me where I live, even earthquakes!
 

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good video, CS. thanks for posting it. i keep hearing about the fires in AZ, it gets mentioned a few times on the news. but they never have good pictures to go with it, just smoke in the distance.

i watched a fire move like last year up in the Missouri Breaks. one thing i learned from that experience, if you have a white truck and are getting tired of it's color, park it where a air tanker is going to drop fire retardant. your truck will be pink in no time! and it will last for a few weeks as well and you'll be known as the cop who drives the pink patrol truck :eek: :D:
 

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Pleasantly demented woman
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Be careful, Comanch. Y'all have got to be getting very tired by now. Take extra care not to make dangerous mistakes.
 

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Maybe rethink you BOB for long term. If this happens after the SHTF, you are really in trouble without a BOB.

I shot this on Sunday. This fire took 70+ homes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJ4VtFNZoMs&feature=feedwll&list=WL
didn't get far into it and I stopped, I'm a member of the local volunteer bushfire fighting brigade. Don't like fires until they're put out.

You'll all know or have notice how fire races up a hill very fast, if you didn't know already for every 5 degrees increase in incline, the fire will double in speed. going down a decline the reverse is true. If you're going to fight a fire on a hillside, you soon work out where you can fight it, on the downside...sometimes if the fuel load is too high and/or the wid speeds are high enough, you gotta set up firebreaks and let the hills burn.

If you've ever thought about a fire bunker, give yourself a foot of dirt on top of the walls/roof if you can and have a cornering entrance, that is you walk along a short corridor (protected) and turn to the door, this way your door doesn't get full frontal heat radiation...which can kill you inside.

Stay safe folks and if you're fighting a fight, risk assessment is constant and ongoing. Also if you usually drink 2 litres of water a day, make sure you have 15.
 
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