Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Nice, but still not a lot of space to keep stuff. Plus I think biking with a full pack on would get old fast. I have seen trailers set up for it, but that would limit you to roadways or at least really smooth fields. Depending on your situation though, it is a very plausible idea.

Something like this trailer might help out.

Foldable Bike Cargo Trailer

Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Bicycle tire Automotive tire


Though I think this guy must live somewhere VERY flat.

Wheel Tire Bicycle Sky Vehicle
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
18,886 Posts
I want my water bottle handy. If I was in a rock free zone then I'd consider a stove. But there are closed fire seasons to deal with I guess. Panniers with a bag on top for bulky stuff like sleeping bags and jackets.
 

·
Registered
None of your business.
Joined
·
3,418 Posts
Given the recent event in my area (I-95 shut down for 24 hours due to snowstorm) a bike would have been useless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
763 Posts
Nice, but still not a lot of space to keep stuff. Plus I think biking with a full pack on would get old fast. I have seen trailers set up for it, but that would limit you to roadways or at least really smooth fields. Depending on your situation though, it is a very plausible idea.

Something like this trailer might help out.

Foldable Bike Cargo Trailer

View attachment 410098

Though I think this guy must live somewhere VERY flat.

View attachment 410097
The only thing scarier than going up hill with that would be going downhill!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
I rode my bicycle all over the area around Basel, Switzerland/Germany/France on weekends and school vacations. Yeah, I covered a lot of those Kilometers with my bike strapped to the rack of a bus or train but I pedaled my butt up and down a bunch of hills too! Many of those were camping trips. My bike had saddle bags front and rear, luggage rack front and rear and I often wore a back pack. The trick to wearing a back pack while pedaling a bike, is to to keep it from swinging and load it lightly. Keep all of the heavy weight low on the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
I live close to the continental divide here in Montana and every summer quite a few people come pedaling thru on their way from mexico to canada.
Many moons ago I was stationed in southern germany and bicycled camped many miles around the area. Then they had separate bike trails and cars were used to bikes on the roads.
I collect good shape used bicycles that are older versions of quality mountain bikes. I get them at yard sales or thrift stores then
stock tires and tubes and cable kits.
The first photo of this thread looks kind of like these army bikes.
The Buffalo Soldiers Who Rode Bikes
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,036 Posts
I mentioned this on here [ somewhere ] and will remind y'all again.

The Vietcong used to use bikes to move 500 POUND loads over the Ho Chemin trail daily !.

Yes 500 POUND loads that they usually walked beside.

So a bike is a very viable tool if you prep it and train with it a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
I say the single speed (less is more, maybe 3 spd on hilly terrain) Schwinn Heai Duti's or Worksman Industrial Newsboy's area about the toughest most heavy duty bikes you can find. Add some racks and baskets and maybe a cart if necessary and you'd be set to go . We use them out in the refinery I work at and they get left outside and used and abused more than you can imagine and they keep on kicking butt. The most common problem we have with them are flat tires but them bikes go through hell and you're going to go through tires on any bicycle if you use it enough.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top