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Anyone out there know if the Orange Home Depot buckets w/Lids are good for food storage, say for like Rice???
 

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If the food is sealed inside a Mylar bag it should be okay, but home depot buckets are not food grade buckets so I wouldn't use them without the Mylar.

You can get food grade buckets a lot of times by going to local restaurants, pizza places etc... and asking the manager if you can buy there used buckets. They usually throw them away and sometimes if you offer to buy them they will sell them cheap or just give them to you. You have to wash them out and I recommend adding some bleach to the wash just to make sure it's clean but the buckets can be reused.
 

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Had a great many people say no, I have not personally used them.

I would NOT be leery of a bucket simply because it's colored. I realize someone might say that the coloring is dangerous. I would point out that

1. In the recycled buckets most folks use- i.e, the green buckets that held pickles or the red buckets from Firehouse subs (available for $2. each from Firehouse, just go in and ask). In those types of buckets the pickles are just in the bucket with the water. I.e, NO MYLAR is used. Ditto with the cake icing and pie filling buckets you might get for free (or used to could) at Walmarts and Sams club. I'm sure in hundreds of thousands of buckets weekly that these places get this food in, that isn't protected from the evil colored plastic, someone would have gotten sick by now if there WAS A DANGER.

2. I could show you rice, whole wheat and other grains stored since the late 80's, early 90's in buckets just like that, including one that we just finished with rice from 1991 (a green bucket) put up by simply pouring the rice in the bucket - no one knew about mylars and o2 absorbers back then.


Check the bottom of the bucket, there should be an HDPE 2 symbol on the bottom of the bucket. This is the three arrows chasing each other with a 2 in the center.

By all means use mylar and o2 absorbers to protect your food long term.

Contrary to certain thinking that you can "always buy food" it's wise to have food ON HAND for your family and a ways to produce some more if possible.

It's not too late to put together a basic year supply for less than a $1. a day!

check www.survivalreport.net under the title "food storage" for how to pack your own food on the cheap and save money versus buying commercially packed.

Good luck! If you have any questions regarding packing please let me know.

Lowdown3
 

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Coincidence, but I just nabbed some food grade containers from a friends restaurant. They're big, and designed to store food. A lot of restaurants just recycle them, and you can get lids for them as well, and they'll store a whole lot of rice. They're free, and made for the job :thumb: Hope this helps.
EDIT- Just checked, and they've got the arrows with the two as well. Yay!
 

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Home Depot buckets

The last batch of buckets I bought at Home Depot were white, the new orange versions were just being unloaded that day. I am using the orange bucket lids, no problems so far. The orange lids seem slightly more flexible than some of the white lids I have used before, that may be a good thing. I would look at the number on the bottom of the bucket to verify that is the same type plastic. Other than being very visible I would not expect a problem. You should wash the buckets as they collect dust and truck exhaust particles during truck transit. In general the buckets are getting thinner as manufactures try to reduce their cost. As the buckets get thinner we will need to be more careful storing them. You should allow the oxygen absorbers to do their thing before the lid is driven on the buckets to keep the bucket side walls from having to resist any additional stress.
 

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We use the orange ones. It's all dry food and it's not in direct contact with the buckets anyway. The orange ones do have the HDPE symbol on the bottom as well.
 

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The home depot orange buckets are not food grade and it is not the orange color that will hurt you.
It is the chemical used as a mould release agent that is part of the chemical list in the buckets formula that is toxic.
It is bad for you.
I hesitate to use them even with mylar because I have never been able to get a straight answer out of the bucket manufacturer as to the possibility that the relase agent may be corrosive to the metal in the mylar bags.
When I asked such as Rose in Winter suggested they said they didn't know as they had never been confronted with the idea hence no testing.
I'm getting my buckets at the grocery store bakery now.
They smell of frosting but out in the open a few months and that goes away and is very unlikely to permeate mylar bags.
 

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Watchful and Hopeful
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If it is not food grade, it is a no no!! You may have been thinking that you have had no problems using any ole bucket because to date there have been not problems, but the release agents are CARCINIOGENTIC. You can be unknowingly causing your family to suffer from cancer(s) down the road!!

Please be very cautious and careful with this!
 

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The number 2 recycling number on the bottom means HDPE the only plastic I am aware of that can be certified as food grade. To be sold as "food grade the manufacture must have them inspected by the FDA. The important thing is to use a Mylar bag, as it is the barrier that keeps your food fresh, the bucket is just a mechanical support system for the bag and contents to protect them from being punctured. The bag makes a hermetic seal when it is heat sealed, no gasses get in or out. Getting a deal on a free pickle or other used food bucket is the best thing, you are recycling, saving money, and you know the bucket was of good quality. If you have to buy buckets do it, the important thing is to get your food stored while you still have time.
 

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True that. My understanding is that there is no difference between an everyday HDPE bucket and a "food grade" bucket, aside from some inspection fees, as Ken said.

The big box stores in my area sell thin-walled, poor quality buckets and HDPE buckets. As long as its HDPE it's good. My locally-owned franchises (like Tru-Value) sell HDPE buckets and lids which include gaskets, which is what you want. Home Depot and Lowes around here sell press on lids with no gaskets.
 

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If it is not food grade, it is a no no!! You may have been thinking that you have had no problems using any ole bucket because to date there have been not problems, but the release agents are CARCINIOGENTIC. You can be unknowingly causing your family to suffer from cancer(s) down the road!!

Please be very cautious and careful with this!
Food grade plastic contains no Benzene. Non-food grade plastic contains Benzene.
Benzene is a BAD carcinogen. My employer uses the OSHA .5PPM level to maintain compliance. Info is found in part 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)

The Benzene must be removed in plastics to make them food grade. I would not gamble on Mylar to protect food against a poison of this nature. I have 28 years working with
Petrochemicals...

Fellow54
 

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Watchful and Hopeful
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Food grade plastic contains no Benzene. Non-food grade plastic contains Benzene.
Benzene is a BAD carcinogen. My employer uses the OSHA .5PPM level to maintain compliance. Info is found in part 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)

The Benzene must be removed in plastics to make them food grade. I would not gamble on Mylar to protect food against a poison of this nature. I have 28 years working with
Petrochemicals...

Fellow54
Was the quote to show us in agreement?

Thanks for the finer details of what I was trying to say. I had no idea what the carcinogen was, rather just that it was there.
 

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True that. My understanding is that there is no difference between an everyday HDPE bucket and a "food grade" bucket, aside from some inspection fees, as Ken said.
Which is a total mischaracterization of what Ken said.
So no. Untrue that.
Advice like that could hurt people.
 

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food grade has to be white in color....and i hope those of you that are packing in buckets wash them and let them air out for a couple days. They do off gas for a short time.
 

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Deo VIndice
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Food grade plastic contains no Benzene. Non-food grade plastic contains Benzene.
Benzene is a BAD carcinogen. My employer uses the OSHA .5PPM level to maintain compliance. Info is found in part 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)

The Benzene must be removed in plastics to make them food grade. I would not gamble on Mylar to protect food against a poison of this nature. I have 28 years working with
Petrochemicals...

Fellow54
Good info...thanks...hey...which part of 29cfr is that in? I work mainly with 29 cfr 1910. If it's there, how about a clue? It's like 2,000 pages. yeah i have it in book form, no life...LOL. And I use the web if in a hurry. There's so many chemicals and carcenogens to keep up with, it's almost impossible! I do SHE for a living. Safety, Health & Environmental. :thumb:
 
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