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Low speed , High drag
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Discussion Starter #1

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What hell, pay attention
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I cut my share of line as a surveyor for over 30 years. My favorite tool to do so was one of the SS bladed, "katana" Samurai swords.

They are sharp, lightweight, have reach, and dont tend to overtravel on the cut. With the proper cutting technique, you can usually cut a "green" 3" tree or limb in one cut with one. Ive also (unintentionally) cut through barbed wire fence unseen in the brush with it too.

If it just has to be a brush hook, you want one like Goblin shows in his link. It cuts in both directions and is a better tool for the job. We always had a couple of this type on our trucks.

Ive used the ones like that in your link too, and they work, and they, and brush hooks in general, also kind of suck. The biggest problem with them is, they tend to be heavy, slow to swing, and dont really cut very well, even when sharp. They also tend to overtravel when you swing. are hard to stop once you do, and can be dangerous to those who are near you as you cut. More so that other things anyway.

The one tool I always hated for cutting line, both to use and be around someone who was, were the machetes. They are too short, have no reach, and generally dont cut all that well, especially with things that are heavier than "leafy". Leafy stuff and people seem to be their favorite things to cut. :)

Ive seen a number of people cut with them over the years, and in a number of ways. With one, the blade broke about 4" back from the tip, and that piece impaled the boy behind and off to the side of the user in the leg.

Another time, one of the office engineers was out with us and was carrying one on his "upstream side" of the river we were walking across to get to an island in it. He was wearing shorts, and let the blade "dip" into the current, and it took it into his leg. Made a nasty cut too.


This is what I use.....





This is the sort of thing we used to cut through....


https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/se...1/media/62908564431/medium/1190387865/enhance
 

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Low speed , High drag
Joined
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976 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I cut my share of line as a surveyor for over 30 years. My favorite tool to do so was one of the SS bladed, "katana" Samurai swords.

They are sharp, lightweight, have reach, and dont tend to overtravel on the cut. With the proper cutting technique, you can usually cut a "green" 3" tree or limb in one cut with one. Ive also (unintentionally) cut through barbed wire fence unseen in the brush with it too.

If it just has to be a brush hook, you want one like Goblin shows in his link. It cuts in both directions and is a better tool for the job. We always had a couple of this type on our trucks.

Ive used the ones like that in your link too, and they work, and they, and brush hooks in general, also kind of suck. The biggest problem with them is, they tend to be heavy, slow to swing, and dont really cut very well, even when sharp. They also tend to overtravel when you swing. are hard to stop once you do, and can be dangerous to those who are near you as you cut. More so that other things anyway.

The one tool I always hated for cutting line, both to use and be around someone who was, were the machetes. They are too short, have no reach, and generally dont cut all that well, especially with things that are heavier than "leafy". Leafy stuff and people seem to be their favorite things to cut. :)

Ive seen a number of people cut with them over the years, and in a number of ways. With one, the blade broke about 4" back from the tip, and that piece impaled the boy behind and off to the side of the user in the leg.

Another time, one of the office engineers was out with us and was carrying one on his "upstream side" of the river we were walking across to get to an island in it. He was wearing shorts, and let the blade "dip" into the current, and it took it into his leg. Made a nasty cut too.


This is what I use.....





This is the sort of thing we used to cut through....


https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/se...1/media/62908564431/medium/1190387865/enhance
I'm to old to be a ninja.
 

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Si vis pacem, para bellum
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7,314 Posts
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Razor-B...VDNvACh3NVgy4EAQYASABEgJARfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
I use a razor back keeping the ditches and swamp clear on my edge of it. prefer the longer wooden handle can get down inside the canal/ditch double edge.
Don't use it on Yaupon. The handle broke on the third swing. Took it back and got a replacement. It broke on the 5
fifth swing. Took it back. No more in stock, got a refund.

Now I use an older Cold Steel heavy machete with the two foot extended handle.
 

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Third World'er Lunatic
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16,245 Posts
Don't use it on Yaupon. The handle broke on the third swing. Took it back and got a replacement. It broke on the 5
fifth swing. Took it back. No more in stock, got a refund.

Now I use an older Cold Steel heavy machete with the two foot extended handle.
no Yaupon here small gum water oak, some mangrove, tons of bamboo..... had mine bout 15 years...
 

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Premium Member
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45 Posts
I use a light 16" bar chain saw and save my shoulders the wear and tear from swinging. I tried everything to clear trails and the chainsaw is the easy and fast way. I cleared an acre of heavy brush a couple years ago in a month, part time.
 

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Member
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3,066 Posts
Years ago I had some heavy brush clearing to do. I bought a Poulan straight shaft weed eater with a heavy grass blade. With the length of the shaft the blade was about 4' in front of me. As it was it didn't work well with brush so I did something many would say was incredibly stupid but I would do again if faced with the same need. I removed the guard for the grass blade so I could install a larger 7 1/4" carbide tipped circle saw blade. I was careful to insure when cutting something it was on the side of the blade rotation would pull the blade away from me and over the years never had any issues with it. While going thru some heavy grass I brushed up against a pine tree with about a 4" trunk, didn't even realized I hit it till it fell over so if someone were to try it on their own I would recommend extreme caution and not use it with anyone in close proximity but really don't consider it any more dangerous than a chainsaw.
 
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