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Tell the truth, coward.
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Hi, I'm starting my 2nd month on leave, I'm knackered and it's midwinter here, and I'm loving every second of not being up a ladder in the freezing cold, pruning things.

So of course I'm broke. Broke at home in winter. Oh dear, how sad, never mind.

Looked in the fridge. Nothing. Looked at my yeast container. Not much. My budget for food is very low.

With great cunning and brilliance I poured the last of my yeast into a jug, half filled it with water, threw in some sugar and covered it in gladwrap. Poked a hole in the top and it's now living in the cylinder cupboard just above the pipe (ie, warmest spot.)

People bang on about sourdough bugs using flour, and also living in the fridge. No.

I need too much bread a week to do that. I can't get by on 2 loaves a week. I need 2 loaves every 3 days. So I need my yeast to double every 3 days.

That means at least 3tsp sugar a day, and somewhere warm to eat it all.

Some people use flour for their sourdough.

Why?

To make the yeast in the habit of eating the flour carbohydrate, to evolve it so that it doesn't need to eat sugar.

So again: why? Why bother?

Exactly. I don't. It's fed sugar. I don't have flour rotting away in there.

I'm happy with a sugar bug. It's in the same state as it was in when I poured the yeast into the jug.

Have to turn the oven down. I can smell that unbelievable, stunning, unbearably gorgeous aroma of sourdough bread hitting that 'time to turn it down' stage.

I'd better take the butter out of the fridge too...

:)
 

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If you also have cinnamon, you can make sweet rolls.

Once the dough has rested, it will be easy to roll out. Dribble it with butter or margerine, sprinkle well with cinnamon and generously with sugar, roll it up, slice it, and lay it in a pan.

Rise and bake.

Turn it out of the pan while it is hot or the sweet stuff will all stick to the pan!
 

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Tell the truth, coward.
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the yeast udate. :) what is knackered?
lol. Oh.

A knacker is someone who takes old, clapped out horses and turns them into glue and dog food.

So an old horse or cow who's utterly worn out would be said to be knackered... right after getting knackered. Um.

Nowadays it just means shagged. That's poked. um. Shattered. Tired. Overtired. Ready for a damn good rest. :p
 

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Raving Loony
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Being broke sucks.

But I still think you're pretty cool. Most folks would not have the skills.

I would not have the skills, at least not to your degree.

I was just thinking the other day about how I need to get back on my broke momma game, before we need me to get back on my broke momma game. About how we've been so prosperous for so long that I've gotten fat and lazy and spoiled, turning into one of the exurban yuppies we now live amongst.

Ugh. Sorry you're broke, but I still have to admire the **** out of you.
 

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Daughter OfThe Revolution
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Abby, That's awesome! Congratulations. I love the smell of fresh bread baking. Mmmm! :)




We started making wild yeasts, so far they work, but not as well as store bought yeast. We've done apples, pine needles, and raisins. The raisins seemed to work the best. I'll let you know how the bread comes out.

Good luck Abs!
Recipe, or it didn't happen! :D::cool:
 

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Cake or Death....
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Fill a mason jar about 1/4 full of either whatever you're using (apples, raisins) we're experimenting with pine needles

fill to 3/4 full with water

put the lid on loose and put in a warm spot

Day 2 swish around gently and open the lid....... repeat daily for around 4 to 5 days


Substitute the "yeast water" for the water in your bread recipe, usually I let my dough rise overnight

and wah lah!!

We haven't gotten fantastic results yet, my money is on the raisins. Still in the process of perfecting it. I'll share the findings. Good luck!! :D:
 

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Tell the truth, coward.
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Discussion Starter #12
Bread is a cheat's game. it's unbelievably easy but everyone's always wowed.

I didn't use a recipe and now have two loaves of brioche. I kid you not. Its texture, form, flavour is brioche.

1. going to go buy some gluten flour to put in it,
2. need wholegrain flour, kibble, and I think coarse ground corn meal.

if you take 1/2 c of kibble/corn meal, cover it and simmer for five mins, then cool, you can put that in your bread for a bit of texture that doesn't break your teeth, and goodness. Molasses goes well into bread. Milk powder too.

Lecithin, whatever. We have a health bread in New Zealand called 'Vogel's' - people get their parents to send it when they live overseas. it's wonderful bread, very good for you and deliciously tasty. I'm pretty sure it has a spot of vinegar in it too, which comes out when you make toast.

Bread is fun. It's mucking around playing with playdough it really is. There's very little you can do to destroy it totally, even if it turns out solid and evil looking you can still cut it very thin and eat it as toast with cheese on. Oh wow, stale home-made bread cut very very thin with cheese and pickle is fantastic. You can't cut store-bought bread thin.

Sorry. I'm on holiday so relaxed, and starting to have a bit of fun. There is nothing in the world like having no work in winter: restful, relaxing, you can knit and watch movies, winter is the best time of the year to have a holiday. :)
 

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That sounds good. I have tried making real bread and so far only succeeded with a box mix. I think I had bad yeast.

I have successfully made Irish soda bread, which uses baking soda instead of yeast, and only takes about an hour or so to bake. It's incredibly easy -- just add ingredients to a bowl, mix, and then pour into a bread pan. I omit the raisins and nuts from the online recipes.
 

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Tell the truth, coward.
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Discussion Starter #15
In the US kibble is dog food. I hope thats not in yur bread. LOL oould love to read your recipes and you should post pic's if you can. :)
haha! Whoops!

Kibble here is ground up grains. Yes - you have dog kibble too and it's totally different but kibbled wheat or kibbled rye are chopped up rye and wheat.

if you put them straight in the bread they don't get enough moisture to be edible. They would remain like gravel or some other tooth-destroying nightmare. It's also how you make that lovely cornbread, by which I mean real bread but with kibbled corn in it, which is really nice.

My recipe:

This is what I always do, and any alteration is an alteration to this basic recipe. I no longer really measure anything but the flour and water. The rest is measured in gloops, glops, flips, chunks and splats, highly technical measurements of course, which it is totally vital to get right.

Easy bread: makes 2 loaves.

950g (2lb) flour of any kind or mixture, but more than 2c wholemeal is too much I think;
600ml (20 fl oz) luke warm water.
two tbsp (30g*) surebake OR 2 tbsp (35g) compressed yeast and 1/4tsp ascorbic acid, OR 2 dssp (20g) dried yeast, 1/4tsp ascorbic acid, 1/2 tsp sugar.**
1tbsp (15g) sugar
1 tbsp (15g) salt
1 tbsp butter or oil.

Now; put your yeast into the luke warm water. Set aside to prove. What is proving? It's proving that the yeast works and hasn't died in your cupboard. if it doesn't change respectably in 20 mins into something frothy and happy to be alive, it's dead and you have to throw out that whole batch of yeast. Luckily you don't have to throw out the whole batch of bread.

While doing that, put all your dry ingreds including oil/butter into the cake mixer with kneading attachment. That or prepare a bench with flour and put dry ingreds into a bowl with a well in the centre.

Pour your yeast liquid into the dry ingreds and set to knead on a relatively slow speed for 10 mins, alternately mix with a knife until a dough is there, then start kneading/mashing till all flour from bowl is incorporated, finally put dough on floured board and knead for approximately 10 mins.

After 10 mins grease large bowl, put dough into this bowl, turn over to grease top of dough. Cover bowl in plastic wrap and put somewhere warm to double in bulk or more. I turn my oven onto about 35 (90?*f) and put it in there.

When doubled, take dough out of oven and splodge onto floured board. Squash flat. Roll up. Cut in half. Put each half into a loaf tin, double in bulk covered in plastic wrap, then bake.

Bake about 15 mins at *440f and then turn down to 375 for rest of baking (approx 1/2 hr. Check however as ovens vary.)

done.

Last night's bread:

brioche-bread 060813.jpg

Was flat. I was not using a recipe and was using my first halving of a home-made yeast bug. Used far too much oil not only in the mix but also when putting bread into bread pans. This has created a delightfully crispy toast-like crust. I also took the loaves out of the tins and cooked in oven for last 5 mins to crisp the bases, and had a pan of water in the bottom of the oven to help the crust too. All in all, the crust looks terrible but taste and texture are divine.

Also: I forgot entirely my basics and only used about 750g flour instead of the more correct 950. So that was 1 3/4lb flour..ish, instead of 2lb.

brioche-bread2 060813.jpg

Internal texture: you can see the crumbly texture, not long slim lines, cake-like crumbs. That's an indication that my flour, being ultra cheap bulk buy (yay prepping) didn't contain enough gluten. I can go buy some gluten flour and chuck a couple of tbsp in when making bread to make up for this.

The kneading process stretches the protein chains in the flour dough, creating something elastic and desirous of pulling back into itself. If you knead too long you can actually break your bread. I never broke my bread, I did not have enough flour, which meant the kneading was more of a mixing, and the chains never really pulled out straight. Imagine brushing very curly hair and putting it in rollers. That's what you are doing. And then when the yeast creates c02 it pushes those fibres further apart and you end up with something light, springy, strong yet soft. This combing process of kneading is what distinguishes bread from cake, basically.

If you remember I had too little flour which translates to too much liquid - that means I never quite managed to comb the fibres. They could retain too much kink because they were slippery, and slipping around the 'roller' instead of being caught and pulled taught.

And so of course this loaf was cake. Or brioche if you like. :D: The flavour however was fabulous. I am considering switching to brown sugar though, just for nutrients.

*an american ounce is about 28g if you don't have scales that will give you grammes. As such, 15g is about 1/2 oz. 30g is about 1 oz ish, and 35g is a nice fat pregnant oz.
**ascorbic acid neutralises dead yeast, stopping bread from getting that funky flavour. You get dead yeast cells in your yeast the way you get dead skin cells in your bed. yeast dies all the time.
 

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Wannabe Mountain Hermit
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Mmmmm, just thinking back to my childhood, my granny and aunts used to make sourdough biscuits, breads, you name it.

Since I've had to be gluten free I just have not been able to find a gluten free flour that tastes just as good.:(
 

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First, love this thread! Thanks for sharing it. :thumb:

Ground up grain here in the U.S. is usually called rolled grain or milled grain. Now I know what my friend Fran from NZ means when she says kibbled. :D:

I live a feast/famine kind of life too. I make most of my money in the summer and pay most of the big bills in the winter. So there are some months where I have to look up to see broke. By the end of January (after the property taxes are paid) I am living off the root cellar, sprouts, and whatever I can scrounge from the wilds (I love northern pike in the winter). Sour dough bread is a staple here.

For those who want to cheat, buy your yeast or borrow a pack from the neighbors. I buy my yeast in bricks and will give a tablespoon away to friends if they ask. Put it in a jar with some sugar water (I use maple syrup) and let it start to bubble. Then you can feed it one a day or keep it in the fridge and feed it every few days and there's your yeast starter. From a tablespoon or one little packet of yeast you can make bread for the rest of your life. You can also do this with grapes, apples, and even scrapings from white barked trees. It starts off weaker than store bought yeast but if you feed it everyday you eventually won't be able to tell the difference, strength wise.

Because I make so much wine here my house is alive with yeast and I have no problem starting a bug. But if you like to keep your house sterile, store bought yeast may be the only way to go for you. Once you get your bug though you can treat it just like sour dough and keep it forever. I have a ginger bug that is probably 15 years old. But then I like ginger ferments so I make a new batch every couple of days.
 

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Thanks so much for the information. I'm new to bread baking so have lots to learn - I started baking last month in an effort to save some money as we're also going through some broke months :) ... so find the info about the yeast really useful as here the price is going up to R3.99 for a small 10g packet.

I have just been making artisan bread that needs no kneading - and yes it's cause I was lazy :) and its so easy - and the kids love it. But I guess I should grow up now and make some PROPER bread !!

A few questions:
Say I make the yeast mixture - well first I want to know how much water and sugar to put with it,
then how much would I typically use - for example like in your bread recipe above where you say use 20g dry yeast - how much of this mixture would you use?
And how much water and sugar would you put back in your yeast mixture again for the next day ?
I bake two smallish loaves now everyday (hey I have two teenagers and a tween, one's a boy - 17 and can eat a loaf by himself in one sitting).
So would there be enough yeast for me to take some every day ?

I've never heard of ascorbic acid before - does it have another name ?

Also... you talk about adding gluten flour...here we only get cake flour and bread flour - I guess you're talking about bread flour then ? I have been buying cake flour lately so save some money ( Go figures in a country where a lot of the people are starving - they'll have the cake flour R5 cheaper than the bread flour that people should live off - Feed them cake !!! ) and have noticed that it's struggling to rise some days... probably that darn gluten !!!

Sorry for all the stupid questions....
 

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Tell the truth, coward.
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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks so much for the information. I'm new to bread baking so have lots to learn - I started baking last month in an effort to save some money as we're also going through some broke months :) ... so find the info about the yeast really useful as here the price is going up to R3.99 for a small 10g packet.

I have just been making artisan bread that needs no kneading - and yes it's cause I was lazy :) and its so easy - and the kids love it. But I guess I should grow up now and make some PROPER bread !!

A few questions:
Say I make the yeast mixture - well first I want to know how much water and sugar to put with it,
then how much would I typically use - for example like in your bread recipe above where you say use 20g dry yeast - how much of this mixture would you use?
And how much water and sugar would you put back in your yeast mixture again for the next day ?
I bake two smallish loaves now everyday (hey I have two teenagers and a tween, one's a boy - 17 and can eat a loaf by himself in one sitting).
So would there be enough yeast for me to take some every day ?

I've never heard of ascorbic acid before - does it have another name ?

Also... you talk about adding gluten flour...here we only get cake flour and bread flour - I guess you're talking about bread flour then ? I have been buying cake flour lately so save some money ( Go figures in a country where a lot of the people are starving - they'll have the cake flour R5 cheaper than the bread flour that people should live off - Feed them cake !!! ) and have noticed that it's struggling to rise some days... probably that darn gluten !!!

Sorry for all the stupid questions....
firstly: these are not dumb questions. they're really good questions and someone else will read them and be sooo glad you asked cos they were too shy,...

2ndly sounds like briar knows more about this than me so do please, Briar, jump in and correct me. I expect to be wrong because I just follow my nose. :D

My experience of a yeast bug:

how much water does not matter, but at least 2 cups. A jarful. When you halve the bug you mix it all up so it's suspended (yeast goes to the bottom of the jar when it's run out of food and sits there like a resentful fawn-coloured lump of goo) and then pour out half. Then top back up with water and feed it that day's sugar.

My bug works harder and faster in the cylinder cupboard than someone's bug would work in the refrigerator. it eats faster, it replicates faster, it just does it all faster. I feed at least 3tsp sugar a day.

Now why? And this is where Briar should jump in...

I do it this way because my ginger beer bug always took 1 tsp sugar and 1tsp ground ginger a day to feed, adn was halved once a week. Therefore 7tsp sugar = doubling of yeast bug. :D:

Logic then tells me that if I've got my bug to eat 7tsp sugar, it should be ready to halve.

I don't know if this is true of course, it's just what I'm doing this time around. i've had a hard time getting enough yeast to get enough bread using sourdough methods in the past.

Ascorbic Acid: you get it from a chemist in NZ, the place you get toejam cream, prescriptions and face products. Don't know what they're called in S. Africa. Its other name is Vitamin C. It's cheaper by the jar as ascorbic acid of course, but you can grind up those cute orange flavoured Vitamin C pills if you have to. Also a squirt of lemon juice in the bread would probably work although I have never actually tried it.

It helps your bread have more of a store-bought flavour, a bit less yeasty. This is useful when you have children who are fussy.

other clue: bake bread after dinner when the oven is still hot, and don't let the teenagers near it.

They won't go through anything like as much bread when it's cold. That was what mum used to do. :D:

Oh - Gluten flour is different from bread flour, it's far more concentrated. Bread flour is normal flour with gluten flour in it. You only need a couple of tbsp of gluten flour in bread if you're using cake flour.

How much yeast mix I use: half of it. I realise though that I could have a big bug and take off a fifth or something - and then it would grow big and strong again quicker. Possibly even in a day.

Which is what you want!

What would happen if you started your bug with say, 7 sachets of yeast, (one for each day) and then gave your bug 7 tsp sugar a day, and took 1/7th off it every day for 2 loaves?

I think that might work! I'd probably want 7 cups of water (guessing -briar, save me!) and a nice warm place. I have my bug in a measuring jug.. I might change to this system as well.

Oh in closing: remember always to stir when you feed. it helps get rid of alcohol, which is a byproduct of yeast fermentation.
 
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