Survivalist Forum banner
  • Are you passionate about survivalism? Would you like to write about topics that interest you and get paid for it? Read all about it here!
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Fenced In
Joined
·
3,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(I originally posted this over at Bladeforums, so if you are a member there, you may have already seen it. I thought it might be of interest to folks here.)

So, conventional wisdom states that you should use the right tool for a job, and while camping recently, I was equipped with a hatchet and folding saw appropriate for splitting firewood. I was also equipped with a brand new Schrade SCHF36 that I'd bought specifically for the purpose of taking on camping trips. Seriously, like I'm not going to baton with it? I'd bought it at a gun/knife show from a dealer who uses the same model as his woods knife (he had it with him, definitely had seen a lot of wear and tear) and I compared it to some other sub-$50 fixed blades. I liked some of the features, such as 1095 blade, suitable ergonomics and choil to fit my hand, included sharpener and ferro rod, etc. Not thrilled to see that this model was made in China instead of Taiwan, and paid too much for it (At a gun show?! Never!) but whatever. I was going on a trip in a few days, so it was as good a time as any. Now, after buying it, I read some comments online about some SCHF36s having slightly warped blades, which sure enough, mine had too. Not much I was going to do about it right then, and I wasn't concerned. A co-worker of mine bought an SCHF36 from the same dealer for the same purpose a day after me, so I figured I wasn't going into this expecting too much.

Well, on our first night out, come dinner time, I decided that the Schrade was going to prove what it was made of. This was in a state park where you had to buy your firewood at the park HQ, and for the sake of full disclosure, I had no idea what kind of wood it actually was. However, I've batoned with a Schrade X-Timer with "Schrade+" stainless steel before, so I figured this would be a piece of cake. Yeah, maybe not.

I pick my baton and my victim and set to the task. First hit is fine, so is the second, but something is definitely wrong on the third strike (I'm out??) and not where I was expecting trouble. The handle is loose in my hand:



The tang cracked at the first handle screw, all the way through. However, on both halves, it sure looked like rust at the point of the break:




I'm not pleased about this, but the trip must go on. When I get home a couple of days later, I read over the Schrade warranty. They've definitely worded it in such a way as to get out of replacing a knife used for anything other than cutting, so I contact the dealer I bought it from. The guy travels to gun shows (no B&M storefront) and I don't expect him to replace it, but I ask him if he's ever had any issues with his SCHF36. Nope, he uses it as a bushcraft knife and has had nothing but success. He says he's never had to return anything to Schrade under warranty and suggests I give them a try. Before calling, I check their website, and right on the SCHF36 product page is a promo video of this model being used exactly as he described, including chopping and batoning wood. OK, so I figure I might have a shot, and call their customer service. The woman I talk to asks me what happened, I tell her what I was doing with it AND about the appearance of rust, which surprises her. "We're waiting on the next shipment to arrive, but send it in and I'll have a replacement out as soon as they're here," she tells me. No busting my balls about batoning with a knife, no grilling me about anything, nada. Now, I wasn't thrilled that it was going to cost $9 to ship back, but now I was in it for the experience as much as to get a new knife.

Anyway, she wasn't kidding - a week later, I received my replacement knife. I haven't taken the scales off to look for anything suspicious, but at least the blade isn't warped. No camping trips planned for a while, so I don't know when I'll have an opportunity to test the new one, but I thought I'd at least relay my experience here since people seem to ask about these Schrade knives with some frequency. I'm not turned off to the brand - they took care of me far better and faster than expected - but I'll be curious to see how this knife holds up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
Well, good on Schrade for replacing it. But Schrade used to be a purveyor of solid American-made knives, really good ones at that.
Now...I might buy Chinese knives if I saw better quality control. nothing against Chinese per se. But I just don't see the quality and workmanship I desire for knives.
Their firearms can be excellent, if plain. Maybe they think knives are throwaway items? Have you seen China-made multi-tools? Useless and ugly. The Chinese are capable of better work. Maybe they should take lessons from the Japanese. Oh, I forgot - they are too proud to do that.
I see much better quality cutting tools from Brazil (Tramontina, for instance) than I see coming out of China.
 

·
Thread killer
Joined
·
1,237 Posts
I've been hearing good things of a few knife manufacturers in china. I avoid their products based on inconsistent qc, but gave a Rike Knives titanium flipper a shot. I am favorably impressed. Cpm d2 blade, ball bearing pivot, slab titanium scales, and steel lock face insert that doubles as an over travel stop. What's not to like? I've cut a ton of cardboard, hard plastic banding straps, and skinned a mile of pallet plastic without so much as a single edge deformation. I keep my knives in very sharp condition, and have only stropped the edge once in two weeks. So far, this knife has changed my mind about Chinese manufacturers capabilities. I do applaud Schrade (Taylor) for standing behind their product, but prefer brands that don't have to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,316 Posts
I always thought drilling a hole in the middle of a knife tang is the dumbest possible way to secure the handle, yet nearly every knife maker does it....EXCEPT Mora. That's why Mora blades never break despite being partial tang.

Once a knife tang is perforated, each side to the hole is equally as weak. When one side cracks or breaks, the next side falls right along with it and now your knife is in two. But for some reason these knife makers keep doing it so they can put these crappy scales on there that aren't even ergonomic and don't fill up your hand.
 

·
I'm not a prepper
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
Good to know schrade/Taylor brands is taking care of you. Fwiw mine and my brothers schf36s have held up fine so far to batoning.

When I stripped mine I found a bit of surface rust under the coating. So I could see how if it had a hairline crack in it, It would be full of rust.
 

·
BEAST
Joined
·
15 Posts
Seems like you got a lemon. I know the early models had a lot of things wrong with them like the warped blades, your new one should be fine. My schf37 has seen a lot of batoning and no issues whatsoever. I need to get my hands on the schf51/52 with the improved handles.
 

·
Force To Be Reckoned With
Joined
·
196 Posts
I have that same Schrade, mine came warped really bad, banana's off to the right, I just don't like the overall look, feel, fit and finish of it and haven't ever used it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
I have bought 4 SCHF36 knives and give them out as gifts. I take one camping with me every trip, and I went 15 weekends this summer. Never had any problems with mine, but I don't baton with any knife. That is what the hatchet is for IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
Any knife can break their tangs, except quality hollow handles it seems... Why? Because smaller tangs vibrate less and are harder to break, just like small blades are harder to break than big ones of the same stock...

The funny thing is, I made a list of around ten custom hollow handles on Bladesforums, including one production model: The later models Buckmaster (early ones had un-annealed tangs, so the Bill Bagwell test wasn't allowed to be included): I challenged anyone to produce any photo of a broken hollow handle tang, on basically all the existing quality custom models, plus the Buckmaster, any photo from any source older than the challenge, and that if they did, I would send them my $2000 Lile Sly II completely free of charge (this is after one guy claimed a 5 second
search could produce such pictures)...


I repeated I would hold up my end of the challenge (I don't much like the knife): So far it looks like I am keeping my Lile...

Gaston
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,316 Posts
As far as breakage, I'm not concerned about knives that you had for 3 years and abused far beyond their intended use, until the point they finally give out and break. I'm only concerned with guys like OP who break out their knife for the first time and on the second baton strike the thing snaps like a toothpick.

Anyone can google image broken knives of any brand, some of which probably were subjected to torture testing just to see what it would take to break them. I wouldn't exactly compare that to other knives that break early on during normal use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,908 Posts
I always thought drilling a hole in the middle of a knife tang is the dumbest possible way to secure the handle, yet nearly every knife maker does it....EXCEPT Mora. That's why Mora blades never break despite being partial tang.

Once a knife tang is perforated, each side to the hole is equally as weak. When one side cracks or breaks, the next side falls right along with it and now your knife is in two. But for some reason these knife makers keep doing it so they can put these crappy scales on there that aren't even ergonomic and don't fill up your hand.
I have to disagree with the holes in the tang. Even if you have 3 small holes in the full tang, the "totality" of the steel has to be taken into thought. Also, the toughness of the tang from proper HT. Of all knives I've tested, few have failed anywhere in the tang.
I baton, and I know the pressure each hit can put on a blade.
 

·
Thread killer
Joined
·
1,237 Posts
What was the reason to baton the knife? You already had the proper tool(s) on hand.
A knife is a slicing-cutting tool, not an axe.
I'll take a shot at an answer. I am guessing YOUR knives are for slicing-cutting, and you therfore assume everyone is in the same predicament. The reality is that I, and I can only speak for myself, seek out, aquire, and use knives designed for batonning. A quality brand name, designed by a reputable designer, manufactured by a reputable company. Check the descriptions for a Dpx Hest 6, or a Survive! GSO 10. They are specific to situations that you may find you don't have your mule cart full of tools, axe, saw, Pulaski, wedge, , maul, hoe,...well, you get the point.

My point is, I also have knives that are purpose built, skinners, paring, machetes. These knives are purchased and used for their intended purpose, but given their quality, I wouldn't hesitate to use them harder. That being said, I also have "minimalistic" grab and go bags that have "jack of all trades" sharps. These are the applications for my hard use knives, right tool for the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,908 Posts
Me, I find the right knife, that can Baton....my PMoore's haven't let me down..& i have Abused them! You may wind up with only your knife, & the bush, then it Better be the Proper tool, that's my outlook...
Functional Hard Use Knives
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
I'll take a shot at an answer. I am guessing YOUR knives are for slicing-cutting, and you therfore assume everyone is in the same predicament. The reality is that I, and I can only speak for myself, seek out, aquire, and use knives designed for batonning. A quality brand name, designed by a reputable designer, manufactured by a reputable company. Check the descriptions for a Dpx Hest 6, or a Survive! GSO 10. They are specific to situations that you may find you don't have your mule cart full of tools, axe, saw, Pulaski, wedge, , maul, hoe,...well, you get the point.

My point is, I also have knives that are purpose built, skinners, paring, machetes. These knives are purchased and used for their intended purpose, but given their quality, I wouldn't hesitate to use them harder. That being said, I also have "minimalistic" grab and go bags that have "jack of all trades" sharps. These are the applications for my hard use knives, right tool for the job.

There was an axe on hand. And the knife broke. Whats wrong with this imaginative picture? Lol
Of course I'm toying with you guys. It is funny though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
use an axe....what can i say....breaking knives batoning wood is the trend....lets see a broken axe/hatchet or a broken knife filleting a fish,dressing out a deer etc etc etc ..... then it`ll be news...just saying.

even then ....when i think about it...i see a lot of axe use, when it would be better using a saw, nevermind hahaha
happy holidays all!!!!!!!!
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top