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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading a First Aid Manual just now, and it mentioned some stuffs about <Head injury>, and, one of the symptoms it mentioned is that 'clear fluid leaking from nose and ears'.

Can anyone explain why will it happen? Any medics here could help? I would love to learn more about First Aid. :D
 

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ditto to what the others said. Additionally, if you encounter someone with a head injury that is bleeding from the ears, you can perform a halo test to check for the presence of CSF.

To do so, dab a piece of sterile gauze on the blood. Blood will stay in the center while the CSF will move towards the outside of the blood forming a ring or "halo" around the blood.

Leaking CSF from the nose or ears is bad news and usually accompanied by severe head trauma and intercranial pressure (ICP). Left untreated (and often even after treatment) patients presenting with ICP suffer from brain damage or death.
 

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finding leaking CSF is a sign of a head injury. That said, main thing you should be looking for is the "altered level of consciousness". This could be something as varied as being completely unresponsive to painful stimulus, to asking repetitive questions, having a short term memory, being irritable, impulsive behavior (like trying to get up off the cot despite being told to lay still every 10 seconds, and trying to pull their C-collar of constantly).

When you find CSF leaking to out side of the head, it usually means you have blood leaking to the inside. the danger in this is that there is a vary narrow channel that drains CSF into the spinal cord. if blood blocks that channel that CSF is gonna accumulate in the cranium and add to Increasing ICP. this normally requires chemical sedation & chemical paralysis, mechanical ventilation, A drain drilled into the brain to drain excess fluid (ventriculostomy), somtimes a section of skull is removed to allow the brain to swell.

despite all these treatments, people are seldom "normal" again after surviving. such injuries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
...To do so, dab a piece of sterile gauze on the blood. Blood will stay in the center while the CSF will move towards the outside of the blood forming a ring or "halo" around the blood.

Leaking CSF from the nose or ears is bad news and usually accompanied by severe head trauma and intercranial pressure (ICP). Left untreated (and often even after treatment) patients presenting with ICP suffer from brain damage or death.
That sounds very scary... just wondering, the "blood forming a ring", do you mean this :
 

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Another way to check for CSF is place a drop on a blood sugar monitor, if it reads high, then it's CSF.
 

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Think of it as one of the few protective barriers to your brain as well
Cerebrospinal fluid is what the brain basically floats in. It's meant to act as a cushion but is also in the ventricles of the brain and it bathes the spinal cord. When someone suffers a head injury that is penetrating, either from the outside or from the inside (bone in the skull actually ruptures the arachnoid membrane) it allows the spinal fluid to leak out. While it can be a very bad sign, it is not always equal to a devastating head injury. I wouldn't necessarily write of a casualty with a csf leak. I would do my judging by mental status and changes in mental status, other signs of brain damage such as posturing, pupil reaction, reaction to pain, level of conciousness and of course if your seeing brain, it's not going to turn out well.
 

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Copy and paste from the Yale school of medicine:
What are Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks (Spinal Fluid Leaks)?
At the Yale Sinus and Allergy Program, we are specialists in treating cerebrospinal fluid leaks and the symptoms associated with them.

Cerebrospinal fluid is a clear, colorless fluid that surrounds the spinal cord and brain. When this fluid leaks from the brain or spinal cord, it is called a cerebrospinal fluid leak, or CSF leak. When the fluid leaks, the pressure around the brain and spinal cord drops.

Symptoms of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks
If you have a cerebrospinal fluid leak, the clear fluid may drain from your nose or ear(s). The most common symptom is a headache that improves when you lie down and worsens when you sit up. The headache may be accompanied by nausea, light sensitivity, and a stiff neck.

Please use this information as a guideline, as not all possible symptoms are addressed. Having these symptoms does not mean that you have a cerebrospinal fluid leak. However, if you think that you do, you should contact your doctor right away.

Causes of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks
Cerebrospinal fluid can leak if there is a tear or hole in the membrane (thin tissue) that surrounds the brain and spinal cord.

The most common reasons for the membrane to tear include:
Certain head, brain, or spinal surgeries
Head injury
Placement of tubes for epidural anesthesia
Spinal tap
Sometimes, the reason for a cerebrospinal fluid leak is not known

Risk Factors of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks
A risk factor is anything that increases the likelihood of developing a condition. However, having a risk factor does not mean that you will develop the condition.

The most common risk factors for a cerebrospinal fluid leak include:
Head trauma
Certain brain or spine surgeries
Obesity
Skull base tumors
Congenital or developmental defects
Some spinal procedures

Treatment for Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks
In most cases, the cerebrospinal fluid leak will heal on its own; bed rest for a few days is the most common recommendation, as well as pain relievers to treat associated headaches. The greatest concern of a CSF leak is developing meningitis, which is a life-threatening bacterial infection, so antibiotics may be prescribed.

Pneumocephalus, which is a buildup of air within the cranial cavity, is another life-threatening complication associated with CSF leaks. If the leak does not heal on its own, other treatments may include placing a lumbar drain to assist the tear in self-repair or surgical repair of the tear. Surgical repair may be performed via a minimally invasive, endoscopic approach. The term “endoscopic” refers to the use of small nasal telescopes that allow all of the surgery to be performed through the nostrils, without the need for any incisions on the face. Special instruments are then used to repair the damaged tissue.

If your cerebrospinal fluid leak needs surgical attention, you can rest assured that our surgeons at the Yale Sinus and Allergy Program are specialists in the most-advanced, minimally invasive techniques. We know surgery can seem intimidating, so we take the time to answer all your questions and concerns. We want you to feel comfortable every step of the way.
 

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CSF is bad, if it's leaking you have a serious injury, for the prepper if you see this your "patient" is most likely going to die.
 

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Hello, my cousin had an accident over 15 yrs ago, he has leaking clear fluid coming from his ear and nose at the moment, the hospital don't seem to have any answers at the moment and have put him on antibiotics. The thread is very worrying, who are the specialists dealing in this type of injury?
Many thanks in advance.
 
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