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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen this posted on a few sites as to advantages of the muzzleloader over the crossbow/bow. BTW no am not saying this as my only weapon I already have a .30-06 and a .22 Lr and plan on getting a 12 G shottie and a semi-auto/lever .30cal (Canadian guns law suck)

In the Bow/crossbow area is see a silent, renewable from naturally materials, affective, (with practice) killer of small and larger game.

In the muzzleloader I see a loud, non-renewable, affective killer of larger game. I don't know about putting a .45cal bullet through a tree rat or even a rabbit. I'd think that would be a bad idea.

I'm considering purchasing a less modern weapon next year and the Bow can be used in my area for hunting both bow and Muzzleloader season I am just checking into this idea. I think the bow is the best purchase over all but I am interested in what other people think about this. This is for a long term stiuation.
 

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Well, if you are thinking about decades after shtf, then bows would definitely have an advantage.
For small game though, you would not use a .45, more likely a .36 or .32.

One thing though, wind has a lot more effect on arrows than on bullets. And within a range of less than 50 yards, bullet trajectory is negligible, while arrow trajectory is important. So archery skills take more skill and training to aquire.

So the question to ask, are you in it for most efficient harvesting of meat? Or are you in it to spend many many hours enjoying a new hobby.
 

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In my state(ND) you can only use a crossbow if you are disabled. I have a soft spot for smokepoles. I have a .45 Kentucky and a .73 cal Enfield that it really hurts to shoot more than a couple times. It will stop a deer like a freight train though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, if you are thinking about decades after shtf, then bows would definitely have an advantage.
For small game though, you would not use a .45, more likely a .36 or .32.
The only issue I see for that one is the need for .45 cal for deer if I remember right. I'll dig out my hunting regs and see.
One thing though, wind has a lot more effect on arrows than on bullets. And within a range of less than 50 yards, bullet trajectory is negligible, while arrow trajectory is important. So archery skills take more skill and training to aquire.
There is that from my understanding the muzzleloaders are good to 100 yards and I can use a slug gun for the season or a bow. I've seen a lot of guys saying that the Muzzleloader can be used forever without running out of blackpowder they have found a way to make their own sulphur. Carbon is easy to come by and salt peter can be made. I'm not near a volcano and I haven't found a way to make sulphur yet. That is possible in my area.

So the question to ask, are you in it for most efficient harvesting of me
at? Or are you in it to spend many many hours enjoying a new hobby.
Little bit of both I like the gun sound but I also like the way a bow feels when shot. I'll be getting the bow I think then and practicing with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's silence is a great advantage, be it shooting food in your back yard so the neighbors don't know or taking out a sentry after dark...
It also would make me feel better shooting over the garden for *****, tree rats and rabbits it they stroll by my place for a snack and I don't have to worry too much about limits just cook em quick. :D:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In my state(ND) you can only use a crossbow if you are disabled. I have a soft spot for smokepoles. I have a .45 Kentucky and a .73 cal Enfield that it really hurts to shoot more than a couple times. It will stop a deer like a freight train though.
In my province the Crossbow gets lumped into bows. However some if I remember correctly have that limitation as well.

Yeah that is one thing the Muzzleloader is nice for the stopping power and the similarity to the other rifles out there.
 

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they are both good for putting meat on the table but I would have to admit. I don't even own guns anymore. Once I shot my first longbow I was hooked. I have a longbow and an old Ben Pearson recurve and I wouldn't trade them for any firearm out there. I have started building my own bows and that is an adventure in itself. Also couldn't see myself shooting a compound bow or sitting in a tree stand. I think stalking is half of the sport and challenge of hunting. Just my opinion:)
 

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in terms of a direct comparison between a muzzle loader and a CROSSBOW the crossbow wins hands down.
At a 50 yard range a crossbow is as if nor dependably more accurate than a muzzle loader with the advantage of no noise and NO SMOKE. Black powder burns "dirty" and firearms that use it require frequent cleaning (unless you go with a smoothbore musket type, which is inherantly innacurate)
A crossbow firing blunts will be quite efficient in dropping smaller game, and bolts can be quickly adapted to fire broadheads for larger game, a muzzle loader does not have this flexibility.
Oh a quick note on broadheads, on large game orient your broadhead on the bolt so that the blades are vertical, for dropping two legged varmints orient the broadhead so that it is horizontal.. (this goes for arrows too) If your wondering why, feel your ribs and then look at your dog or cat, which way do the spaces between the ribs run?
I would also suggest that with a crossbow you dont consider anything with less than a 150# prod, and the longer the draw the more power will be imparted to the bolt.
Equating a crossbow with even a modern compound bow is a fallacy, the way they accellerate a projectile, the size and weight of that projectile are all radically different.
 
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