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No doubt this will stir up some controversy, but I see and personally know a few people that spend thousands of dollars modding 4WD vehicles and essentially turning them into battle wagons. While I can't deny that the vehicles are very bad a$$, I just see too many "what if's".

If you live out in the desert and can't afford to travel on foot to a BOL due to the harsh environment and there's nothing between you and your destination but open space and dirt, I can see the need.

For the rest of us that can't drive across an unobstructed landscape, roads are a necessary evil. Even with a Hum-v you can't drive through trees, wetlands, mountains, etc. but for so long. If TSHTF you can bet that every suburbanite will be clogging the roads and highways trying to make it for "Paranoid Paul's" cabin in the boonies. With this said, there will undoubtedly be predation from organized crime groups, rouge "bandits" and ordinarily peaceful folks that are simply desperate to care for their loved ones. So, the roads will be clogged with vehicles (both operational and not) and there will be hordes of the worst possible element... (terrified and desperate) people. This being said, not only will you not even be able to get your V8 battle beast out of the drive way because of the roads being clogged, you will also be more of a target (theoretically) with all your gas/water cans strapped on, huge mud tires, etc.

Then, there is the issue of fuel. Eventually it WILL run out and when it does, you are left with an expensive road block.

If you are fortunate enough to live in a rural area with a bit of property, I can understand keeping your BOV "in the barn" until the initial shock is over and the heard has been thinned out a bit and then using it to conduct "operations" while the fuel lasts. Or, maybe even being able to produce your own fuel via ethanol or some sort of gasifier.

These are just some thoughts that I've had. What do you guys think?
 

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17 Oaks Ranch Tx
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No doubt this will stir up some controversy, but I see and personally know a few people that spend thousands of dollars modding 4WD vehicles and essentially turning them into battle wagons. While I can't deny that the vehicles are very bad a$$, I just see too many "what if's".

If you live out in the desert and can't afford to travel on foot to a BOL due to the harsh environment and there's nothing between you and your destination but open space and dirt, I can see the need.

For the rest of us that can't drive across an unobstructed landscape, roads are a necessary evil. Even with a Hum-v you can't drive through trees, wetlands, mountains, etc. but for so long. If TSHTF you can bet that every suburbanite will be clogging the roads and highways trying to make it for "Paranoid Paul's" cabin in the boonies. With this said, there will undoubtedly be predation from organized crime groups, rouge "bandits" and ordinarily peaceful folks that are simply desperate to care for their loved ones. So, the roads will be clogged with vehicles (both operational and not) and there will be hordes of the worst possible element... (terrified and desperate) people. This being said, not only will you not even be able to get your V8 battle beast out of the drive way because of the roads being clogged, you will also be more of a target (theoretically) with all your gas/water cans strapped on, huge mud tires, etc.

Then, there is the issue of fuel. Eventually it WILL run out and when it does, you are left with an expensive road block.

If you are fortunate enough to live in a rural area with a bit of property, I can understand keeping your BOV "in the barn" until the initial shock is over and the heard has been thinned out a bit and then using it to conduct "operations" while the fuel lasts. Or, maybe even being able to produce your own fuel via ethanol or some sort of gasifier.

These are just some thoughts that I've had. What do you guys think?
As an avid and at times quite the hard core off roader I agree in your thoughts. No need for any rig beyond a OEM Jeep CJ.YJ.TJ or JK and good off road tires. That will get you further and deeper than most will or want to go. There are many other rigs that do it, but few as cheap or as well at a late model Jeep Rubicon.

Outfit it with a 36 gal tank some GY MTR or BFG KM2's get there for sure. Save all the battle wagon add ons for buying more ammo and support items to load in it.

That said clearly not needed if your BOL is your back yard...

Not sure I would store it in the Barn, I can think of NOTHING that does more damage to a rig than storing it, even when stored properly sitting idle is just not what they are made for.
 

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IMO BOV are only logical for those that live in a region where going off road in harsh conditions is necessary. Otherwise it is mostly a fantasy along the same thinking lines as "enough ammo to fight the U.S. military" or "BOB for living in the wilderness, when I have never done it much before"
 

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That's why it's important to stay alert and get out first. There's very little excuse to be caught up in the crowd unless something dramatic happens without warning. Even then, survivalists are in a far better position to grab the bug out bag and head out, than the confused sheeple who haven't figured out what to do yet.

And those same clogged roads are another reason that the built up 4x4 you mentioned is a good idea. You may have to four wheel down an embankment and offroad for miles before being able to four wheel back onto a clear spot on the road again.

I think that depending exclusively on a vehicle is foolish, but having one set up to handle most everything you might encounter, as a backup, makes a lot of sense. As well as perhaps dirt bikes, bicycles, and even plans to go on foot.

Once again, it all comes down to the fact that nobody knows what's going to happen. Despite the nonstop flood of predictions from people who are convinced that their pet scenario is the only possibility. Being prepared for "whatever might happen" is just a LOT wiser.
 

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I will be using my Super Cub on Tundra tires. Definitely worth it. Can land and take off on a football field, highway, riverbed, sand bar, gravel bar and the sides of many mountains. Very fuel efficient. Can only haul 2 peeps and their packs, though. However, if it's going to be my mode of transport to my BOL, that's all I need to take.
 

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...
And those same clogged roads are another reason that the built up 4x4 you mentioned is a good idea. You may have to four wheel down an embankment and offroad for miles before being able to four wheel back onto a clear spot on the road again.

...
That reminds me of story. Back many years ago I was driving on a divided highway that was covered with recent deep snow. The traffic had come to a complete halt in both lanes. Nothing moving for some distance ahead. Behind me a fellow in a 4wd truck with large tires got impatient and pulled off onto the side embankment and plowed through the snow to see if he could get around the stalled cars. He unfortunately could not see the hollow and conduit that was under the snow that ripped his undersides of his truck out. As the traffic started to flow about a 1/2 hour later he was left sitting off the side of the road with his wrecked expensive truck. I always wondered if the police gave him a ticket for being stupid. :)
 

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Everyone talks of clogged roads, the majority of people will travel the highways out of town then it will be secondary roads, I will travel the backroads and side roads where most will not be. Spending a few dollars on a good map and a tank of gas to check these roads out and to learn them well is a lot more cost effective that having a 4x4 that is an advertisment for a parts store
 

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Where I live it floods, so a good vehicle is key. Many, even police cars, have tried to drive through the flood waters and got stuck. The 4x4s didnt, infact one had to rescue some of the others.

In our recent heavy snows this year, many ferried local nurses and Drs to work and helped others reach hospital when ambulances couldnt get there.

One of my brothers cars, not a 4x4 but a Russian car not only had an exhaust that could be moved to above the bonnet but also crank started at - 40, thus allowing him to go to his work in a much needed service.

I have my eye on a boat/car which would be very handy. I for one love 4x4s, the chunkier the better, its just a shame we have such narrow roads we cant have the big humvies like in the US.
 

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Dios y Tejas
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Everyone talks of clogged roads, the majority of people will travel the highways out of town then it will be secondary roads, I will travel the backroads and side roads where most will not be. Spending a few dollars on a good map and a tank of gas to check these roads out and to learn them well is a lot more cost effective that having a 4x4 that is an advertisment for a parts store
During hurricane Ike (I believe) all our roads both major and minor were clogged to a standstill all the way out to 70-100 miles from the center of Houston. Everyone in the City (and Galveston) got a map and if the road was on the map, they headed out that way. We live 50 miles from downtown Houston and the road( medium duty) in front of our house was a parking lot. We spent 36 hours hauling pitchers of water from our house to the road until the power went out.
The best way to prepare is exactly what MikeK said, ... get out early. So if you live with 50 miles of a City, realize that waiting until everybody else is evacuating is a losing proposition
 

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17 Oaks Ranch Tx
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I will be using my Super Cub on Tundra tires. Definitely worth it. Can land and take off on a football field, highway, riverbed, sand bar, gravel bar and the sides of many mountains. Very fuel efficient. Can only haul 2 peeps and their packs, though. However, if it's going to be my mode of transport to my BOL, that's all I need to take.
Having flown those once or twice a long time ago they are a highly versatile little puppy...not sure about landing on the side of a mountain, think I will watch you...:thumb:
 

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BOVs worth it?
No, just buy a car / suv / truck with bugging out in mind.

My wife has a tahoe, and I have a 4-wheel drive toyota. We can use either one to get where we are going.

One of the biggest issues with evacuating / bugging out is fuel. The better fuel economy you get, the better.
 

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Limpin to safety.
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I have a land rover. Army Green, Reinforced crash bars on the front, Radio, GPS, and it's the 4x4 of the year model.

It's a survivalists dream. I've even got RedDawn stickers and an ak47 Opsec slaughtering decal on the back.

But... is it worth it?

Lets try to be impartial. Is a 8 mpg SUV better than a 70 mpg moped? 50 mpg Prius?

Tactical_N_Practical if you look at his profile is a former Marine. In the marines you learn the art of evasion as well as combat navigation. Roads and SUV friendly fields aren't just obstacles, but kill zones.

In my opinion, yes BOV are practical to an extent. Like any tool, it's all about the application.

Before things get to bad, yes getting that much further pays off. Your Prius wont make it through the tobacco field. More miles you drive, less miles you walk.

However when you are in the thick of it, I'd personally avoid anything that makes noise or requires a road.
 

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Limpin to safety.
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Give you an example. I was on the way to my friends and I had to use our mini van. So I am stuck at the light. In the back is an ak47 with a drum in it as well as many many other fire arms.

This is being semi Grey man. Hiding for the most part, in plain sight.

Also, this video is old. I don't know why I recorded it, other than to point out the contrast of my normal Ride and my wife's van.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v516/darkelfjst/?action=view&current=HPIM8621.mp4
 

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Survivalist Electrician
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I have a land rover. Army Green, Reinforced crash bars on the front, Radio, GPS, and it's the 4x4 of the year model.

It's a survivalists dream. I've even got RedDawn stickers and an ak47 Opsec slaughtering decal on the back.

But... is it worth it?

Lets try to be impartial. Is a 8 mpg SUV better than a 70 mpg moped? 50 mpg Prius?

Tactical_N_Practical if you look at his profile is a former Marine. In the marines you learn the art of evasion as well as combat navigation. Roads and SUV friendly fields aren't just obstacles, but kill zones.

In my opinion, yes BOV are practical to an extent. Like any tool, it's all about the application.

Before things get to bad, yes getting that much further pays off. Your Prius wont make it through the tobacco field. More miles you drive, less miles you walk.

However when you are in the thick of it, I'd personally avoid anything that makes noise or requires a road.
My dad got a Prius right before Hurricane Katrina and everyone (including me) told him he was gay. Two weeks later, gas was five dollars a gallon and there was a three month waiting list on Priuses at all the local dealers. No one's laughing now. I have to drive a truck for my job, sometimes I even have to drive an excursion, but I have to say (and I never ever thought I would say this) I WANT THAT PRIUS!!!!
 

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Limpin to safety.
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My dad got a Prius right before Hurricane Katrina and everyone (including me) told him he was gay. Two weeks later, gas was five dollars a gallon and there was a three month waiting list on Priuses at all the local dealers. No one's laughing now. I have to drive a truck for my job, sometimes I even have to drive an excursion, but I have to say (and I never ever thought I would say this) I WANT THAT PRIUS!!!!
I'm buying one myself. In probably 2 weeks or less.
 

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I'm buying one myself. In probably 2 weeks or less.
Sorry to hijack the thread, but one more thing.

From our family's experience with it, I'll tell you, a lot of it has to do with how you drive it. I've driven it before, and I drive like a jackrabbit. I accelerate way too fast but usually don't drive any faster than 5 to 10 over the speed limit and I'll get like 45 mpg or somewhere just above. But my dad drives it very carefully, doesn't usually go faster than 5 over, accelerates slowly, brakes rarely, on and on and he routinely gets 60 mpg. So just be mindful of how your driving it if you really want to maximize the mileage.
 
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