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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Boots/footwear are arguably one of the most important factors in a SHTF scenario. Your boots will decide whether every step you take is comfy bliss or living hell, and will ultimately dictate your range of movement.

One primary factor that you should take into account when buying SHTF boots are Safety Toes (i.e. steel toes, composite toes, alloy toes, etc.). Now, in a catastrophic event, the terrain will be unpredictable and probably dangerous, and one thing you're going to need to protect is your feet.

So that begs the question- do you sacrifice a little money and get boots with Safety Toes? Or do you save the cash and get standard boots w/o the added protection? And are Safety Toes even really worth it, or do their negatives (i.e. weight...) outweigh their positives?

This brings me to my personal predicament. I'm stuck between buying two boots: The first is a pair of STANDARD Danner 8" Acadia boots, which come with plain, unprotected toes. The second, a few bucks extra, are the Danner 8" Acadia NMT boots, which are the same exact boots as the standards, however they come with Safety Toes.

What do you think about this? Which would you pick?
 

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Time to melt snowflakes!
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What do you think about this? Which would you pick?
Depends on your feet.

I purchased the Reebok 'combat boots' and they are good quality boots. One set with the 'safety toe' the other without. Now, what I discovered, is that I do not wear normal width boots, (I wear the wide variety) the toe cuts into the edges of my feet. So I had numerous problems with that.

After they were broken in they were not as bad, but it took much longer to break in and for my callouses to grow over where the safety toe cut into my foot.
 

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Steel toed and steel shank were required for work, so I've always gone with those. I've never had to get the steel sided logger type.

They'll stop most sharp objects if you chop a lot, they'll stop some moderately heavy stuff, and they'll provide a convient place for the doctors to find your missing toes if it's a heavy enough item you dropped on them.

I like them around fidgity horses and cutting/stacking wood. The added leather and protection adds weight though.
 

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I have had dr. Martins, snap-on (coastal) and a few pairs of red-backs. The red-backs have been very nice from a comfort stand point, and I love how light weight they are.

Comfort and durability are my top two priorities.

I've found a steel toe limits comfort. I lose flexibility, and I find steel toes get stuck in random places since the toe won't flex.

Never had a durability issue with a steel toe.

A great way to add comfort is pick up some sole inserts. Stay away from cheap ones or the cool looking gel ones. They tend to ruin (and I've had the gel squeeze out) quickly. I like dr. Scholls "work" line. Tough and comfy. They help extend the life of the shoe by making them renewably comfortable.
 

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I did all kinds of construction work for 30 years . Also hiked many miles in the woods .
Never had steel or composite toes . Never had any injuries .

Also , like juskom95 , I have a wide foot especially at the toes . I guess I have duck like feet . Tried on steel toe boots and could tell right away they were going to cause problems
 

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All safety toe boots arent steel. I have some danners that arent, they are the only safety toe boots I have. I would never have steel toe. There have been a few times Im glad I had them on. Most times I dont. Its a toss up.I always wear them when cutting trees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the replies. Keep in mind, the specific boots that I'm talking about are composite/non-metallic toes, not steel toes.

As for buying multiple pairs, one for work and one for SHTF, Danner boots are expensive. I can't afford to blow $600/$700 on two pairs of boots, so it needs to more or less be able to juggle work and SHTF.

Lastly, these boots will be used for hiking, granted, but they're primarily to be used for work and a SHTF scenario, where things are unpredictable. Should I really take that risk of not having foot protection?

Bottom line, I need a good everyday boot that can handle work, and at the end of the day, handle an unpredictable SHTF/WROL situation as well. Do I go with safety toe boots are regular ones?

Again, thanks for all the help/suggestions!
 

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Really a lot depends on you feet and how much walking your planning on doing, I have never had a pair of steel toed boots that were comfortable for long walks.

I walk about 8-10 miles in a 12 hr shift of work, always in work boots.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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I have a couple pair of steel toes that are very comfortable. But if I was just buying boots for myself, would not add the steel toe. it adds weight. And yes thermal transfer is worse with a steel toe. Not just cold. I stepped in almost molton metal once with steel toes and damn they heat up right now! Luckily there was a puddle of water not too far away.
 

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Crazy Cat Lady
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I'm married to a blind man in a manual wheelchair.

You better believe I wear steel toes!

I am a woman but men's shoes fit me better. I found a nice "sneaker" type at Walmart for $30 with steel toes. I installed purple laces: perfect.

That way, when SOMEONE rolls over my feet yet AGAIN, I can just laugh and walk away.
 
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