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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't see this subject in other threads, so please forgive me if this is incorrectly posted or redundant.

What's a BOB, you say? What's a BIB? Well, BOB and BIB are acronyms for Bug Out Bag and Bug In Bag, respectively. In case of disaster, man-made or otherwise, you need to get you and your family to your prepared supplies, or at least to a safe area. My plans are to stay local to my home where my supplies are stored, if at all possible, and wait things out. This being the case, I'll need a "BIB". You may chose to evacuate, in that case you'll need a "BOB". What's the difference? Well....not a lot.

I listed here the items that I chose to keep with me in my car at all times to allow me to make it back home, worst case by foot. All these items are carried in a single backpack and tactical style vest. The total weight, backpack and vest included, is just over 60 pounds. Yes, that is a little weighty, but I carried over 80 in the service and can shed items if I don't need them. Better to have, and not need, than to need, and not have.

Well, here's my list....let me know what you think and some of your ideas.

Backpack Qty
Spare Camoflage Shirt 1
Spare Camoflage Pants 1
Long Underwear Pants 1
Long Underwear Shirts 1
Spare Undershirt 2
Spare Undershort 2
Spare Socks 3
Cold Weather Mittens 1
Leather Work Gloves 1
Cotton Gloves 1
Tactical Gloves 1
Goggles 1
Sunglasses 1
Boonie Hat 1
Knit Cap or Balaclava 1
Poncho & Liner 1
Knee Pads 1
Elbow Pads 1
Sleeping Bag 1
Wool Blanket 1
Survival Blanket 1
MRE 3
100oz Hydration Bladder 1
Coffee Filters For Water 10
Water Purification Tablets 1 doz
Iodine Tablets 1 Bottle
Flashlight - AA 1
Chemlilght - Large 4
Chemlilght - Small 4
Lighters 3
Trioxane packs 6
Spare Batteries 1 Set Each Item
Flashlight - hand crank 1
Radio - Crank w/Earbuds 1
Canteen Cup 1
Cable Saw 1
Magnifying Glass 1
Folding Shovel 1
Duct Tape 1 roll
Ziploc Bags 6
Night Vision Equipment 1
Sling Rope 20'
Tent Cord 50'
Electrician Zip Ties 10
Carabiners 4
Small Tarp 1
Cigarettes 4 Packs
Backup Compass 1
Primary First Aid Pack 1 Detailed Below
Foot Repair Kit 1 Detailed Below
Gear Repair Kit 1 Detailed Below
Personal Hygiene Kit 1 Detailed Below

Vest Qty
Aerial Map 1
Lensatic Compass 1
Flashlight 1
Comms Radio 1
Secondary First Aid Pack 1 Detailed Below
5.56mm ammo in mags 300
Whistle 1
Signaling Mirror ESM/1 1
Binocs 1
Lighters 1pk (6)
Parachute Cord (100') 2
Pistol 1
Pistol Ammunition 60
Camo Paint 1 set
550 Cord 50'
Light Wire / Coat Hanger 1

Belt
Rifle Cleaning Kit 1
Cellular Phone 1
Hard Candy 1 Bag
Bayonet / Hunting Knife 1
64oz Canteens 2

Self
Hard Candy Lot
Earplugs 1
M4 Carbine 1
Woodland Camo Uniform 1
Combat Boots 1
Personal Wallet with ID 1
Undershirt 1
Socks 1
Rigger Belt 1
Notebook and Pen 1
Watch 1
Multi-Tool 1

Primary First Aid Pack
Rubber Gloves 3
Small Bandages 6
Medium Bandages 6
Large Bandages 6
Gauze Pads 6
Saran Wrap 1
Field Dressing - Small 1
Field Dressing - Large 1
Medical Tape 2 rolls
Suture Kit 1
Cold Packs 1
Motrin / Ibuprofin 1 bottle
Antiseptic Cream 1 tube
Cyanoacrylate Glue 1 tube
Antibiotics 1 bottle
Antacids 1 pack
Anti-Inflammatory 1 bottle
Ace Bandage 1
Small Bottle Bleach (2oz) 1
Lighters 2
Alcohol Prep Pads 6
Antiseptic Towelettes 6
Eyewash 1
Scissors 1
Tweezers 1
Visine 1
Antihistamine 4
Gauze Rolls 3
Face Shield 1
Knuckle Bandages 4
First Aid Guide - Pocket Size 2

Secondary First Aid Pack
Small Bandages 2
Medium Bandages 2
Large Bandages 2
Gauze Pads 1
Antiseptic Ointment 2
Saran Wrap 1
Field Dressing - Small 1
Medical Tape 1 Roll

Foot Repair Kit
Blister Packs 5
Foot Powder 1
Anti-Fundal Meds 2

Rifle Cleaning Kit
Brush 1
Patches 50
Oil 1
Cleaning Rod 1

Gear Repair Kit
Rivets 5
Epoxy Glue 1
Cord 10'
Light Wire / Coat Hanger 1

Personal Hygiene Kit
NIOSH Dust Mask 1
Soap 1
Toilet Paper 1
Wet Wipes 1 pack
Sunscreen 1 tube
Insect Repellant 1
Garbage Bags 2
Toothbrush 1
Toothpaste 1
Chapstick 1
Paper Towels 15
Washcloth 1
Towel 1

You'll see some duplication between the backpack and vest. If for whatever reason, I have to ditch my backpack, I still have subsets of the defense, water, food and medicine packs on my person in the vest. Total cost for all items (less firearms / ammo) is $542. Quite a chunk of change, but gather a little at a time and it's manageable. Let me know what you think.
 

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Add a tent, bivy bag, stocking cap, backup survival blade, folding saw, mess kit, spare firing pin for your rifle, sewing kit, fishing kit, floral wire.

I would pack as much food as possible even if it means dropping some of the less critical items.

Other than that, looks like a very nice kit. Fantastic job!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your input 14DFASniper...

What kind of tent would you recommend. Surplus or is there a compact, durable commercial one out there that comes to mind?
 

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Personally I like the size and convenience of a three man tent for backpacking that has a floor, bug screen door and windows and top with the collapsable fiberglass rods. You can find them at Wal-Mart, Dunhams, Cabellas, etc. I don't recommend the old military canvas shelter half tents. Just about any type of tent will work as long as it has a bug screen, floor, and is of half way decent quality nylon / canvas.

The three man tent offers enough space not only for sleeping quarters but also to perform other living functions within the tent space if the weather sucks or bugs are excessive. It also allows you to move around a little and store your gear inside with you for security. It is nice to have a little space if you happen to have a companion or even a pet with you.

You don't need the most expensive tent out there on the market. Get one for ~$50-$100 and it will be money well spent. The larger tents (6 man) are great if you can haul it in a car or have to shelter a family.

I look at the tent as the primary mobile shelter until a more sustainable shelter can be construced or acquired. Bugs will make you miserable and can cause disease so protecting yourself from them early is going to be a higher priority than most realize.

BTW - keep your tarp. This can be used to protect the tent, create wind breaks, or a rain or sun awning over your camp area. It has many more uses, but if it isn't committed to be your primary shelter, it will be available for other tasks or for people in desperate need like a family / friend or other refugee.

Whatever you do... HAVE YOUR SH*T TOGETHER and ready to go. (I need to do the same as I just spread everything out to re-evaluate my system.)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Whatever you do... HAVE YOUR SH*T TOGETHER and ready to go. (I need to do the same as I just spread everything out to re-evaluate my system.)
GREAT ATTITUDE!!!! I consider my BOB to be a "living" thing. I review it every couple of months and delete some items and add others. Your age, level of fitness, medical requirements, etc. change so why wouldn't your BOB. I have a couple of friends that built up BOB's and keep them with them, but they haven't reviewed / updated theirs for over two years. I won't fall into that trap.
 

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I like your list :thumb:

I would add many more examination gloves to your first aid kit. 3 pair might seem like enough, but trust me if you are forced to do wound care, you will go through many more than three pair. I would shoot for a small snack-szined ziplock's worth. Little weight, but nice to have.

Not certain I would worry about things like Knee Pads & Elbow Pads but in their place I always bring hiking a small 18x18 piece of closed cell foam sleeping pad. It is the most versatile piece of equipment I have for around a back country camp.


Sleeping Bag and a Wool Blanket? How heavy is the blanket? Perhaps you can substitute a gortex bivy in its place. Most of the modern insulations retain a fair amount of their value even when wet, and the wool is quite heavy for its value (great for a car or somewhere, but heavy for the backpack)

Only three MREs? Hmm, my view is that any event that causes me to wander on foot like a nomad, toting almost 400 rounds of ammunition... that event is going to be a >3 MRE kind of adventure ;)

Cigarettes 4 Packs... you do understand that you can't just bring these alone. Those of us that are going to be hunkered down in the woods with you are going to expect that you have the beer that naturally goes along with these. :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Only three MREs? Hmm, my view is that any event that causes me to wander on foot like a nomad, toting almost 400 rounds of ammunition... that event is going to be a >3 MRE kind of adventure ;)
True battle meal MRE's can be stretched to three meals. So 3 MRE's = 3 days. Hopefully, I'll be home by then. Maybe I did overdo the ammo, I know 400 rds is a lot, but Murphy's Law is always in place!

Cigarettes 4 Packs... you do understand that you can't just bring these alone. Those of us that are going to be hunkered down in the woods with you are going to expect that you have the beer that naturally goes along with these. :thumb:
It's a nasty habit, but the last thing I need to do is stress over no nicotine in a stress environment.

Thanks for the input, always appreciated!!
 

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GREAT ATTITUDE!!!! I consider my BOB to be a "living" thing. I review it every couple of months and delete some items and add others. Your age, level of fitness, medical requirements, etc. change so why wouldn't your BOB. I have a couple of friends that built up BOB's and keep them with them, but they haven't reviewed / updated theirs for over two years. I won't fall into that trap.
My BOB load changes according to the seasons. We're normally pretty warm here, so it only gets winter clothes added for a short time each season.

But the only real way to review a bug out bag is to actually get out there and use it. We had a thread some months back from a guy making his first test run. His trip ended short due to blisters and biting insects. Important lessons were learned and his second trip went much better. Can you imagine how that might have ended if he had never made that first trip, and was forced to bug out in a life or death situation?

My bug out bag tests have given me a lot of insight into what I actually need, versus what I thought I would need. This resulted in some items being added, but best of all, it also resulted in many items being removed, which saved weight. Those tests also let me get intimately familiar with my bug out path so that I knew safe places to camp, places to avoid, and even let me spot great places to plant caches of supplies.
 

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Great thread!!! OMG, Survival Boards has been around for years and not one single thread on a BOB!!! Thanks for being the first. :rolleyes:


sorry, but come on! Try searching.
 
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