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Last weekend I had the opportunity to test my BOB. I threw it in the car as we were leaving for the mountains. I didn't give it a thought. When we got there some relatives decided to do some shooting so I grabbed the BOB since I keep a .22 single action revolver in there.

We hiked up in the "hollar" to shoot various firearms. I had about 300 rounds of ammo in the BOB. I burned through 100 rounds, which has been replaced. But, I also decided to set up camp from my BOB to see if it would be functional. I also found water (I cheated because I knew where the spring was) and started a campfire.

I think my BOB is very serviceable. I did find that I need to think about a more effective first aid kit. And, if I'm stuck in cold conditions without proper clothing it might make for a long night. I'm gonna completely rethink what I have packed.

Fire, got that.

Water, got that (filter and purification through boiling or tabs).

Shelter, got that - except for something to keep somewhat warm. I discovered that keeping the rain off may not be all you need. I need to find something light and effective as a blanket. I figure that BOB also may mean moving everyday so, building a well insulated shelter every night isn't practical. So shelter and insulation are both needed.

Food, I have fishing equipment. The .22 pistol. Cordage for snares. A military canteen cup for cooking. A BOB isn't big enough for groceries.

First aid, reworking that now to be more practical.

Anyway, I learned a few things. I hadn't really thought about testing the BOB in some real world applications.

I will say this, the weight of my BOB is just about perfect. And, it's not so full that I can carry some useful things that I might find along the way.
 

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In terms of first aid
Ace bandages are your best friend
Band aids aren't much help use gauze and duct tape
5 Sam splints
My qualifications are 5 yrs on sar teams as well as a backcountry medic at philmont scout ranch and 10 yrs teaching first aid
 

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Adventurer
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Last weekend I had the opportunity to test my BOB. I threw it in the car as we were leaving for the mountains. I didn't give it a thought. When we got there some relatives decided to do some shooting so I grabbed the BOB since I keep a .22 single action revolver in there.

We hiked up in the "hollar" to shoot various firearms. I had about 300 rounds of ammo in the BOB. I burned through 100 rounds, which has been replaced. But, I also decided to set up camp from my BOB to see if it would be functional. I also found water (I cheated because I knew where the spring was) and started a campfire.

I think my BOB is very serviceable. I did find that I need to think about a more effective first aid kit. And, if I'm stuck in cold conditions without proper clothing it might make for a long night. I'm gonna completely rethink what I have packed.

Fire, got that.

Water, got that (filter and purification through boiling or tabs).

Shelter, got that - except for something to keep somewhat warm. I discovered that keeping the rain off may not be all you need. I need to find something light and effective as a blanket. I figure that BOB also may mean moving everyday so, building a well insulated shelter every night isn't practical. So shelter and insulation are both needed.

Food, I have fishing equipment. The .22 pistol. Cordage for snares. A military canteen cup for cooking. A BOB isn't big enough for groceries.

First aid, reworking that now to be more practical.

Anyway, I learned a few things. I hadn't really thought about testing the BOB in some real world applications.

I will say this, the weight of my BOB is just about perfect. And, it's not so full that I can carry some useful things that I might find along the way.

your going to want a foam mat as well on that list even in a sleeping bag the ground will suck the warmth from you. also a net shirt is a god send in winter time used as a base layer
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/3-new-norwegian-military-net-t-shirts-off-white.aspx?a=644994

and if you can find one I recomend the army gortex bivy bag and whatever blankets or sleeping bag of choice you like
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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An untested BOB is nothing but a bag of false hope. I think back to a thread from a member a couple years ago about his first test run. He had to end it short because of severe blistering and he discovered that he also had to deal with biting insects.

After he got the blister issue solved and added insect repellant, his second run went much better. But if he hadn't tested it ahead of time and had the blisters during a real bug out, he may have died. That's how important it is to test them. Not just hike with them, but actually live out of them to see if they cover your needs.

More importantly, it lets you see what items you don't need and can remove. Lighter is better. My bug out runs also let me get to know my bug out path intimately. To find safe spots to camp, unsafe areas to avoid, and best of all, great places to cache items so that I have access to more stuff than I could have carried.
 

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It could always be worse
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It sounds like your test went pretty well. Thanks for reminding me, I haven't tested my BOB in a few months now. Something to consider to, instead of getting a sleeping bag, consider getting a set of large, warm clothes instead. Just layer them on when you want to sleep and they will keep you just as warm. However, their main advantage is that they let you get up faster if needed then you can locked up in a sleeping bag. Just what I do, may or may not work for you.

As for the medkit, in all my years of living in the bush, and suffering the constant injury of youth, I've found that the most useful item is strapping tape, theres little a few rolls of it won't do.

I hope this helps

Cheers Killzo
 

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Semper Fi
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Glad you tried your BOB out. You carry no groceries? How bout some powerbars, millenium bars, lifeboat rations? Something for 3 days of calories- suppliment with wild game 'n stuff when you can. Cant always. 300 rounds of 22LR will keep you fed, but if everyone is hunting too? Worms 'n crickets are a meal then, not bait...

Poncho liner, two ponchos- one to tie over as a tent, one to tie the poncho liner in, makes a nice sleeping bag. Light compact. Ponchos can also be laid out to collect rainwater, or keep rain off, kinda.

Closed cell foam sleeping pad, even if its 1/2 your body size is still going to keep you warm. If its REALLY cold, you can put your pack under your legs, keep them warm. Cold ground drains warmth from you real quick! Ridgerests are good, lighter than the military isomat, but not as cheap or durable. I love them both, but a SHTF sit, I want an isomat.

Lightweight long johns, at least a top are good too. Polypro or wool blend. And a beanie hat, either wool or polartec. I prefer wool- blocks wind better. Keep your head warm, you stay warm. Cold sucks the calories from you. Arctic warfare you need like 5000+ calories a day to stay in the game. Just sayin, winters coming. All goes hand in hand.

For first aid, I recomend a prepared kit like an Adventure Med Kit- nice 'n compact, add to it. Most kits are crap, AMK seems to actually know wilderness med. Stock it though. Extra pads, gauze, CAT, celox, whatever. I toss in a bic and a bottle of water tabs in mine... Without clean water, you wont last long. Diarreah dehydrates you quick... I love my canteen cup, glad you have one too!!
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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I'm going to offer a disagreement about having food in your BOB. You say you have fishing equipment for food, but that's a bit of a hope and a prayer, isn't it? Further, fish isn't the most...filling, nor high caloric food you can find.

You say that a BOB isn't big enough for groceries, but that sounds to me like a bag that's just too small.

Surely you can find room for some Mainstay or Datrex bars, lifeboat rations, something like that. Even some Clif bars or granola bars or Gorp or...something that can provide you with some quick energy and suffice as morale food.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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I have been camping out of my pack for many years. I have kind of settled on the gear I like the most. Yes, some of it is a bit heavy, but I think a bit of added weight, in exchange for bulletproof/bomb proof gear is worth the trade off.

My big adaptation will be the addition of colder weather clothing, and possibly adapting to a wool blanket over my sleeping bags.
 

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Just livin'
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I also found water (I cheated because I knew where the spring was)
That's cheating? :eek: The way I see it knowing of a water source is just plain smart!

Glad to see that you tried out your BOB though. More people should do it more often. Without regular use in various situations and weather you will never know if it will work or not. Where I live, a summer BOB will get you stone dead in winter.

You may want to rethink about packing food. Living off the land by foraging alone is a pipe dream. Even stripped out MRE's is better than nothing.
 

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You should pack food. I have had 12 rabbit snares out for the past three days. 1 rabbit this morning. Sometime animals just dont move around and theres nothing for a few days.
 

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id add in a life straw or a sawyer squeeze waterfilter, do you dont always have to wait in tabs or boil it

you could add in a wool blanket for some warmth as well as a nice emergency blanket (not the cheap .99 ones but a real one ya can find them on amazon)
 

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"This is my Boomstick!"
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My advise is that you really should add some food to your bag.
You can find individual self serving packs of Tuna or SPAM that virtually take up no room and weigh next to nothing. What is really nice about them is that you really don't have to cook them if you don't want too. Just peel them open and enjoy!

In my pack I keep four slim packs of SPAM, one can of tuna, and 3600 Calories of Mainstay Emergency Food bars. I know that it's not the best food to have but it will keep me fed for a couple/few days while I hunt, trap, and fish for more food.

For a light weight shelter from the cold there are always Escape Bivys.

For First Aid it wouldn't hurt to add a small bottle of Iodine. Iodine can be used to make water potable and disinfect wounds not to mention other uses.

Good amount of .22LR ammunition in your bag! Anything under 250 or anything over 550 isn't that wise. 300 is a good number in my opinion. If you need more then 550 rounds of .22LR to last for a few days or even a week you should probably practice shooting more or get a different rifle or pistol.

1. Water *
2. Food *
3. Shelter *
4. Fire
5. Self Defense/Security
 

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a good test of a BOB would be an S24O.

a S24O, which is a sub-24 hour overnight bike camping trip (or car if you don't bike) these are short overnights....generally leave on Saturday come back on Sunday type. Just long enough to set up camp, sleep, test drive your gear, break down camp and come home.

Cyclists keep trying to bring less and less, but there's no reason your Go Bag or BOB can't do the trick.
 
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