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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here’s the Bob list so far for evacuating by public transport it’s fits into two bags - a 19 litre carry on and a 30 litre back pack. It will be streamlined as it’s still too heavy, so any suggestion what to take out etc would be appreciated.

Fire kit
LED candle
Head torch
Lighter
Matches

Aqueous/water kit
Tea
Coffee
Roll up water bottle
3 containers for stuff on the day
Knife fork spoon spork all plastic
Sugar
Salt
Microfibre cloth
Plastic bag
Need thermos
Need water purifier

Clothes kit
Peaked hat
Summer hat
Winter gloves
Pegs
Compression bag
2 sets of underwear
3 pair of socks
2 or of leggings
2 t shirts
Sarongs
Buff
Flip flops

Food
to pack on the day.

Shelter kit
Picnic blanket
Survival blanket
Door jam
Survival poncho ten
Survival sleeping bag

Security kit (note I’m in the UK)
Door jam
Need to add umbrella

FA and Meds
Disposable gloves
Plasters - band aids
Safety pins
Vaseline
Tape
Dust mask
Aluminium blanket
Mouth cover for cpr
Hand gel
Thermometer
2 x bandages
Triangular bandage
Prescription meds
Prescription form
Ant acid
Immodium
Paracetamol
Ear plugs
Respro mask

Important Document kit
Driving license
DBS certificate
Need to add encrypted usb drive with docs

Survival Kit
Aluminium blanket
Knot guide
Dynamo torch flashlight
Compass
Trap line
Fire steel
Screwdrivers multitool pen
Torch
Matches
Duct tape
Magnifying glass
SAS guide - Lofty Wiseman
SAS tin containing
Scissors
Nail clippers
Cash
Allan key
Sewing kit
Pencil
Fire steel
Pen knife
Whistle

Hygiene kit
Toilet paper
Ziplock bag
Razor
Dental floss
Toothbrush and holder
Tweezers
Nail file
Face cloth
Ziplock bag
Tissues
Deodorant
Soap in holder
Travel towel
Comb

Sewing Kit (there is a thread on this)
Needles
Thimble
Pins
Measure tape
Buttons
Press studs poppers
Hooks and eyes
Thread
Elastic
Safety pins
Scissors

Pet kit
Complete pet kit kept elsewhere

Other miscellaneous kit
Marker pen
Shower rings
Shopping bag
Cash

Tech kit
iPhone charger cable
4 AA batteries in holder
USB plug
USB drives
iPod
Mirror
Altoid tin with sd cards
2 external hard river plus cables
Cable adapter heads
Ear phones

Treasure kit
Photos
CDs with photos
Religious stuff
Jewellery

Navigation kit
Maps
Compass

As I said this is just the packed items at present.

Thanks
Purdy
 

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Purdy,

Safety most important. Lighten this darn load especially by consolidating functions of items.

Try to wear stuff that's realistic to wear.

Ditch the lighter; keep the matches - perhaps even add a 2nd waterproof container load of matches.

Wear a multi-seasonal hat. Seek one that can hold a hat torch. They can be mounted so not that conspicious. Inside hat you can rig it up to carry a couple of needed light items eg some extra batteries.

I carry winter gloves either dangling from a cargo belt or placed in a cargo vest ... I wear 3 cargo vests for most type of evacuations.

Consolidate the picnic blanket with an upgraded survival blanket. I hate the aluminum ones !

Selection of an umbrella allows for having both a walking stick and a small tent pole.

Why the aluminum blanket with the medical stuff ? Use the upgrade survival blanket.

Non-disposal multi use ear plugs can be in a vial and attached to field jacket next to whistle that's not readily visible.

It's really too late for a knot guide. Review the Girl Guide manual and just hope for the best. Same for the SAS guide.

Ditto: Get a multitool with needed size screwdriver(s) (Why many needed ?) and pen knife equivalent. Some multitools have scissors.

Mark off some measurements on some para cord or fishing line. (My zipper pull is 40 ft of 107 lb test braided fabic line for eg small canape shelter. Ditch the tape measure.

Shower rings ?!

Cash in the miscellanous category ? My second home is Hong Kong. Cash will do wonders if in crowded events where you can select who will be near you.

Too heavy and too large a volumn of stuff is dangerous for an evac.

Consolidate, consolidate and wear as much as possible.
 

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Agree either just matches or lighter (remember you have a fire steel in your survival kit).

coffee and tea?

just toilet paper or tissues, they are inter changeable. (If you take a purse from habit you will have tissues.)

dont speak english English. What are pegs and buff?

one blanket, pick by weight. Aluminum blanket good for ground in cold situations, probable won’t last long, but easy to toss. A car aluminum sun screen would last longer but bulkier.

A+ for umbrella, walking stick, rain and sun protection. Very normal looking.

you list things multiple times, between the kits, how many multiples do you have?

put the magnifier in first aid kit. Have a compass on another item —as part of your whistle or flashlight, umbrella, key ring.

wear a money belt with most of your cash and a copy of your important documents on a sd or flash drive. Assuming your personal document kit is your wallet. include a list of phone numbers if you lose your phone. Also one of those plastic magnifier card thinners.

toss the Allen wrench. Get a good multi-tool, many have scissors and screw drivers, some even have nail clippers And nail files. Get a silock. If you wear glasses, or really want small screw drivers, get an eye glass repair kit.

take some vitamins with you. And a small bottle opener/can opener, or one of those small military can openers on a key chain.

a collasping silicon cup bowl is handy. They make pet versions. Catch rain water with it.

if you are planning on taking a coat jacket, add some extra inside pickets with Velcro tops (don’t forget the sleeve areas), stick some of your stuff/kits in there as long as they aren’t bulky. Loose stitch your extra buttons inside for an example.

since you are an English lady, you might want to take a standard looking knitting bag. Knitting needles are able to be used in self defense. Some yarn on the top will hide anything you want to put under it. Make it sure it is waterproof, and closes, long handles will let you carry it on your shoulder.
 

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Everything in there is useful for sure, but the scenario you laid out (which seems like a Ukraine type of scenario), I doubt you'll be allowed any weapons. I don't have specific recommendations of what to take out.

It seems like a lot of stuff. You might be walking long distances, standing in long lines, etc. Your whole life is in that bag, and every time you set it down you risk it being stolen.

Personally, I would basically pack a backpack as if I was going away for a few days and staying in a hotel. Few changes of clothes, toiletries, stuff like that.

The difference is I would have a first aid kit in the bag with less bandaid type of stuff and put extra survival supplies packed in like water tablets and bandana, matches, and a multi tool without a knife. I'd also bring my Victorinox Executive because it would have the best chance of making it through a security check. People aren't as intimidated by Swiss army knives.

I would also pack an extra bottle of water than I normally would, some crystal light packets. Food that doesnt need to be cooked and can be eaten on the run like granola, jerky, dried fruit, SOS bars. Hot Hands packs instead of tons of fire starting.

A small photo album. A flash drive with copies of important docs and family pictures. A deck of cards or other small game.

Being prepared is great. The stuff you listed was creative and useful. But keep mental fitness in mind. It's less likely that everyone scatters and needs to live off the land starting fires and setting traps, and more likely you'll be waiting in long lines, staying in crappy hotels, and wishing you had more hygiene items and less wilderness stuff.

Every area, climate, and country would be different though, so obviously I could be wrong.
 

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Pack good walking shoes. If you have to leave immediately you have your footwear with you and you can change into it later. If you have the time, you can simply pull them out and put them on.

A previous poster said to get a "silock", they meant to say "silcock". I'm not trying to nitpick, but it's a massively important asset and I don't want an innocent typo to lead you to miss out on it. It's a key that allows you to access water systems of commercial buildings, I assume the US and UK use the same keys. If not, a UK-specific one shouldn't be hard to source.

You say you'll pack your food when it's time to go, I think that's a bad idea for three reasons. One, if you have moments to leave it could take minutes to get your food gathered, packaged, and packed. Two, you're assuming you'll have suitable food at the necessary time, instead of stocking suitable food for the necessary time. Three, time spent rummaging through the pantry and putting stuff in a bag is time better spent getting away from the threat.

You have a "trapline", I assume you mean devices to trap animals or the means to make them? If you don't have experience trapping animals, replace this with food. Even if you do have experience, living off the land is a losing game unless you're with several other highly knowledgeable people in an area that can support you. Even if that's the case, trapping requires you to stay in place and you're probably better off trying to get to a safer place.

You have an "aqueous/water kit", but that you need a water filter and thermos. What is the kit you mention? I personally wouldn't bother with a thermos, but I don't know your reasoning so I'll just say that a thermos is a lot of weight and volume. I'd take more collapsible water bottles, and pack a few pre-filled bottles. Any bottled water that's in PCB-free bottles should suffice. You can probably rig some of your existing kit to collect rainwater.

If you don't anything for blisters on your feet, you need that.

I think you have a good kit, it just needs some tweaks. Do you plan on any test uses?
 

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First, lets establish what you might be evacuating from? Is it local flooding or fire? Or is it something requiring you to escape the island you guys call a country ( :) )? Or a much farther reaching issue that makes you a full fledged wandering refugee? This perspective is very important because it can help dictate what you need to carry. As a bookend to that, understand that you can never carry enough to live off of for any moderate length of time. If the event puts you living solely out of a pack for more than a week, you are going to need resupply. Protein bars and freeze dried food only get you so far.

Fire kit. - I would add some tinder such as cotton balls with petroleum jelly and/or wood shavings. These help if all the wood you have access to is damp. Also extra batteries for the head lamp and led light.

Might replace your cutlery with something simpler like this:

Multifunctional Camping Scoop, 5 in 1

This would be a good replacement for the water bottle and a thermos that allows carrying water and boiling.

Rothco 3 Piece Canteen Kit with Cover & Aluminum Cup

Also, evaluate where you may be going through. If you are on public transport, are you really going to be trap line to fish or snare? I do not know about your area. It seem you are trying to cover everything and that is a pitfall with B. O. B. bags. As far as things like a razor and tweezers, do you really need those if it is a big enough issue to evacuate? Maybe you do, but just look at things hard. Taking too much means you will be making decisions of what to drop while stressed and on the move. Do that now while you can think it over.

Good start on it all though.
 

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You’re probably younger and stronger than me, but how much does all that weigh? My pack weighs 25 pounds in the nice months, 29 pounds in winter, and that’s more than enough for me. You might consider one of those duffels on wheels, instead of a pack. I think some those have shoulder straps, in case you ever need them. Look into a vest where you can carry the stuff you absolutely can’t afford to lose; ID, prescriptions, flashlight, knife maybe, cash, things like that. It will help distribute the weight you have to deal with, and if you have to run away and leave your pack behind, you won’t be completely out of luck.
 

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Water bottle, granola bars, sandwich, small flashlight, multi-tool, hat, gloves, change of underwear, maps, phone, charger, ID, cash and a weapon. Whatever weapon you can get away with having on you considering the circumstances. Public transportation is the ultimate Gray Man final exam. People have nothing to do but stare and evaluate each other as they wait for their stop.

The objective is to create distance between you and the trouble you left, and to do so anonymously.

Read a book, even if you never turn the page. Pretend to sleep, or at least be really tired. Don't look around so that you make eye contact with anyone. Get a window seat with your strong side against the wall of the bus/train. On trains that have forward and rear facing seats (rapid transit) sit forward-facing so that you can scan the occupants of the station (waiting to get on the same train you are on) as you pull in, scanning for trouble. Sit near a door and be ready to get off the train real fast.
 

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I might have missed it, but did you include a folding cart? When I was vagabonding I would travel for months at a time using the "chicken bus" so to speak. My pack was relatively heavy, so I had a collapsible luggage cart and could roll it easily a long way. We also have a folding grocery cart that is great for carrying small items without them falling off. But it's not very robust. We use it traveling at hotels sometimes.
 

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If you're evacuating by public transit then you're leaving from society to somewhere else in society. Cut down and streamline the survival stuff and build around what your evac looks like.

I'm escaping the immediate area (chemical spill, fire, etc.)
You need to get some distance away and find a place to stay for a few days. You need tools of civilization - money, a phone, documentation of who you are, a change of clothes, water, comfort items if you have to rough it overnight on a bench or in a station somewhere.

I'm fleeing a regional issue (massive flooding, widespread rioting or social unrest, etc.)
You need to get far away and find a place to stay for an indeterminate amount of time. You need all the tools of civilization, but deeper. You may need to provide for your own protection if things are rough.

I'm fleeing SHTF (Nuclear attack, civil war, alien invasion, etc.)
You either need the tools of civilization and a way to leave the country, or you need a few tools of civilization and a bunch of survival stuff because you'll be hiding in burnt out houses and wilderness areas.

If you're in a situation where need to purify water, ditch a thermos - you'll want a metal cup to boil or cook in and fire making. A sawyer filter, a plastic water bottle, a bandana, and a metal cup make a very lightweight and compact water setup. You can add iodine, aquamira, etc. for a chemical option without adding much weight.

I doubt you'll be trapping or living off of the land in Britain long enough it's worth snaring small game. Replace a bunch of that food gathering stuff with a bag of jerky, a lightweight bag, and knowledge of edible plants in your area.

If you need shelter, a light weight sleeping bag and tarp are the most I'd carry. You can get a setup for shelter like that for under 5 pounds of weight.

It's very easy to pack too many or the wrong clothes. Keep 1 change of technical clothes (quick dry, etc.) in your pack in sealed plastic bag. Every 4-6 months repack it with items appropriate to your season. Add a medium quick-dry yoga towel. You probably don't need any other towels or clothes. Ditch the flip flops for water shoes, crocs, or a similar lightweight shoe you can walk and run in.

Pull out the top 10 bulkiest items and tope 10 heaviest items in your packs. Consolidate any duplicates. Make an argument for how you can do without any of these items. If it's non-life-threatening and you can live without it, remove the item entirely. If not, look at ways to replace it with other items with less weight or bulk. This counts double for bulky AND heavy items.

Try to slim down to a single bag. One single slightly larger bag is better than two bags you have to manage and travel with. Look at international travelers review their bags and the contents. Most of your evacuation scenarios will be easier than their international travel ones, particularly the ones going into less developed areas.
 

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Water bottle, granola bars, sandwich, small flashlight, multi-tool, hat, gloves, change of underwear, maps, phone, charger, ID, cash and a weapon. Whatever weapon you can get away with having on you considering the circumstances. Public transportation is the ultimate Gray Man final exam. People have nothing to do but stare and evaluate each other as they wait for their stop.

The objective is to create distance between you and the trouble you left, and to do so anonymously.

Read a book, even if you never turn the page. Pretend to sleep, or at least be really tired. Don't look around so that you make eye contact with anyone. Get a window seat with your strong side against the wall of the bus/train. On trains that have forward and rear facing seats (rapid transit) sit forward-facing so that you can scan the occupants of the station (waiting to get on the same train you are on) as you pull in, scanning for trouble. Sit near a door and be ready to get off the train real fast.
Welcome to the Forum, US Rifle.
 

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I think you have a good start on working out what you need. Have you tossed the full packs on the scales yet?

I would add a multitool such as a Leatherman Wave with the extra bit kit. It has a file that will do your nails, and scissors to cut thread... I added dental floss to the bit kit holder (white band), teflon tape wrapped under the electrical tape, Has big sewing needle in the elastic, Carbide jaw needle driver and a 4" Crescent wrench. I working on making a titanium pry bar and a new sheath to hold all the other stuff such as my ferro rod design.





On foot you can't afford the weight of redundancy. A ferro rod would last years. Yes lighter/matches are faster but have a short service life. One back pack is all I'd want to fool with, besides your cat container.

You could make replacement buttons out of lots of different things like thick plastic as found in containers.
 

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I would add to the important documents unless it’s already part of the encrypted usb. Consider including things like how to prove where you live, bank accounts, passport, vehicles you own, etc as well as plenty of cash.

I have seen natural disasters where people evacuated and had to prove they lived in the area before being allowed to return. Pretty common way authorities prevent looting (at least in areas where looting and theft is still treated as a crime).
 

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I tend towards the lighter is better, but don’t go to extremes on it!

You will not get a feel for this without traveling light on various weekend or longer trips and keeping notes on what you used and what you wished you had with you!

I use a good quality pack in the 30ish liter size and attempt to under pack it enough to be able to add things as needed! Mine has a very good frame so I can really load it up if needed and I have at times carried a silk weight duffel bag or something similar to put everything in while I use my pack for other things!

Go for multi use clothes in layers and carry a wash kit instead of a bunch of clothes! If I travel with just one pair of footwear I tend towards boots! Last outing I hiked almost 70 miles in my Keen Sandals, but if it was one option I’d have good boots!

A Woobie and Poncho (Or whatever the Brit equivalent is!) gives lots of options! Russians, Poles, Romanians and many others have a tarp that converts to a poncho and 2 or 3 be become a tent that look very flexible in use! (US Poncho is lighter!) My newest Woobie is actually a full poncho with a hood and is warmer than expected and when covered with the standard poncho would stand up to some weather!

Make kits you can keep in a travel supplies tote so you can quickly add or subtract what you need or want! Everything light weight, compact, pre packed and ready to go!

I tend to travel with a Patoo or alpaca wool poncho large enough to sleep under! My packs water bladder/computer pocket have a piece of sleeping pad cut to fit in the pocket when folded in half. Leaning against your pack and sitting on the pad covered with a Patoo or poncho is comfortable enough to sleep/rest in a surprising number of places!

SD
 

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Isaiah 41:10, Acts 5:29
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Readily available and ready to present without digging oropening anything, like when flying or crossing international borders
I didn't see your passport
Is DBS your medical insurance card?
Copy of your vaccinations, allergies, medications/prescriptions
Laminated copy of covid vaccine card on a lanyard
Medications and OTC

Small pocket Bible accessible to read without digging or opening, or hidden in case it would be a problem You could set it up inside a secular book you have already read so it would look like you're reading that. Make sure it's a noncontroversial book you've read and remember so if anyone starts a conversation or asks a question so you can "pass" and also so no arguments start. Sometimes a inane conversation can lead to temporary alliances. Beware a conversation starter may be trying to distract (theft) or probe.

Knitting and/or crocheting also gives you something to do and increase gray woman appearance and distracts people from your eyes while you're watching what's going on around you. You could end up with temporary alliance with someone else knitting or crocheting from commonality.

Cheap sunglasses to protect eyes from bright lights/sunlight and so you can watch what's going without it being obvious (don't wear if/where/when they would attract attention or make it hard for you to see what is going on around you) Tinted glasses aren't near as good, but attract less attentionin a dimly lit area and do tend to deflect people's attention from where you're actually looking. You don't have to carry a lot of thread or yarn because you can pull apart what you made and reuse the thread or yarn. OTOH, the second or third times around, it will be harder to work with and be obvious it's been used before. You could make small gifts like booties or a small scarf or hat to carefully and selectively give/trade to someone (out of sight/earshot of others). Generating goodwill is priceless during evacuation/crowd situations and could be a lifesaver. However, also easy for this to turn ugly if people think you're being discriminatory or entitlement mentality.

In some situations and depending on destination and anticipated housing or camping when arriaval there, I would limit survivalist kinds of things to minimum and make sure they looked like they belong in an urbuan/suburban area or whatever areas you'd be passing through/potentially to as a "normal" traveler/commuter. A very lightweight down alternative blanket/quilt that squishes very small and dries quickly if it gets wet would attract a lot less attention than mylar blankets and be a lot more durable. The US Army Woobie (google it) would be excellent, EXCEPT it's obviously military. However, there are civilian versions or you could make your own civilian version.

Multi-use things to cut down on weight and bulk instead of throw-aways and things that only have one purpose.

Make sure what you have with you matches/reflects whatever story you tell authorities at checkpoints, security checks, ticket counters, security guards/conductors, other people. Take care when talking to other people because collaborators, infiltrators, thieves working together, etc. Being a likeable person can save your life or make your life a lot easier. At least early, being likeable may reduce the liklihood that someone will take advantage. However, acting and looking like an easy or naive mark/victim may easily attract predators.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the help. Keep it coming. I’ve downsized to this - it weighs 17Ibs divided into two bags. That weight is doable.


Bobs list

LED candle
Head torch
Fire steel

Tea
Coffee
Roll up water bottle
Knife fork spoon spork plastic
Sugar
Salt
Microfibre cloth
Plastic bag


Peaked winter beanie
Winter gloves
Pegs
Compression bag
2 sets of underwear
3 pair of socks
2 pair leggings
2 t shirts
Sarong
Buff
Flip flops

Rye crackers


Door jam
Survival poncho ten
Survival sleeping bag

Need to add umbrella

Disposable gloves
Plasters - band aids
Safety pins
Vaseline
Tape
Dust mask
Aluminium blanket
Mouth cover for cpr
Hand gel
Thermometer
2 x bandages
Triangular bandage
Prescription meds
Prescription form
Ant acid
Immodium
Paracetamol
Ear plugs
Respro mask

Driving license
DBS certificate
Need to add encrypted usb drive with docs



Compass
Silver line multi tool
Nano mini stream light

Cash
Whistle

Toilet paper
Ziplock bag
Razor
Dental floss
Toothbrush and holder
Tweezers
Nail file
Face cloth
Ziplock bag
Tissues
Deodorant
Soap in holder
Travel towel
Comb

Needles
Thimble
Pins
Measure tape
Buttons
Press studs poppers
Hooks and eyes
Thread
Elastic
Safety pins

Complete pet kit kept elsewhere


Shopping bag Ripstop nylon
Cash

iPhone charger cable
USB plug
sd cards

Photos
CDs with photos
Religious stuff
Jewellery

Maps
Compass

NB the driving license has my address on it. The DBS certificate allows me to work with vulnerable individuals and shows I have been security checked.

I just need to go through the pet Bob etc and keep decluttering all the kits.
Its for a country wide Uk evacuation as I live near London, so if SHTF here like Ukraine, then all hell will break loose. Putin has already threatened a strike on our capital city.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Here’s the next bit to include as well:


Cat Bob

Tissues
Poo bags
Cooling mat
Grooming glove
Tick remover tool
Small bottle of water
ID Docs
Puppy pads
Small box of cat biscuits
4 satchels of cat food
1 toy
1 spare harness and lead - he will wear another
1 jumper
1 coat
Blanket
2 plastic bowls with lids


I do have a ring sling to add if I need to. His carrier will go cross body.


Thus in total I have 2 hand luggage, 1 cross body cat carrier and 1 back pack. I’m thinking it maybe better to put the cat stuff in the back pack - what do you think?
 

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You should be hands free - all of the time - if using public transport. Your pack should fit comfortably on your lap.

I see where your cat kit has a blanket and two bowls. Are you planning on drinking / eating out of kitty's bowls? Using kitty's blanket to stay warm?

May I suggest a steel water bottle and a nesting cup? I think your tea would taste better and kitty won't have to share....
 

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Readily available and ready to present without digging oropening anything, like when flying or crossing international borders
I didn't see your passport
Is DBS your medical insurance card?
Copy of your vaccinations, allergies, medications/prescriptions
Laminated copy of covid vaccine card on a lanyard
Medications and OTC

Small pocket Bible accessible to read without digging or opening, or hidden in case it would be a problem You could set it up inside a secular book you have already read so it would look like you're reading that. Make sure it's a noncontroversial book you've read and remember so if anyone starts a conversation or asks a question so you can "pass" and also so no arguments start. Sometimes a inane conversation can lead to temporary alliances. Beware a conversation starter may be trying to distract (theft) or probe.

Knitting and/or crocheting also gives you something to do and increase gray woman appearance and distracts people from your eyes while you're watching what's going on around you. You could end up with temporary alliance with someone else knitting or crocheting from commonality.

Cheap sunglasses to protect eyes from bright lights/sunlight and so you can watch what's going without it being obvious (don't wear if/where/when they would attract attention or make it hard for you to see what is going on around you) Tinted glasses aren't near as good, but attract less attentionin a dimly lit area and do tend to deflect people's attention from where you're actually looking. You don't have to carry a lot of thread or yarn because you can pull apart what you made and reuse the thread or yarn. OTOH, the second or third times around, it will be harder to work with and be obvious it's been used before. You could make small gifts like booties or a small scarf or hat to carefully and selectively give/trade to someone (out of sight/earshot of others). Generating goodwill is priceless during evacuation/crowd situations and could be a lifesaver. However, also easy for this to turn ugly if people think you're being discriminatory or entitlement mentality.

In some situations and depending on destination and anticipated housing or camping when arriaval there, I would limit survivalist kinds of things to minimum and make sure they looked like they belong in an urbuan/suburban area or whatever areas you'd be passing through/potentially to as a "normal" traveler/commuter. A very lightweight down alternative blanket/quilt that squishes very small and dries quickly if it gets wet would attract a lot less attention than mylar blankets and be a lot more durable. The US Army Woobie (google it) would be excellent, EXCEPT it's obviously military. However, there are civilian versions or you could make your own civilian version.

Multi-use things to cut down on weight and bulk instead of throw-aways and things that only have one purpose.

Make sure what you have with you matches/reflects whatever story you tell authorities at checkpoints, security checks, ticket counters, security guards/conductors, other people. Take care when talking to other people because collaborators, infiltrators, thieves working together, etc. Being a likeable person can save your life or make your life a lot easier. At least early, being likeable may reduce the liklihood that someone will take advantage. However, acting and looking like an easy or naive mark/victim may easily attract predators.
Good point on COVID record, laminated and on a cord!
 
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