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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm working on my BOB and I'm on a budget so everything isn't purchased yet, and some things I've had to settle for lower models. What I've currently got in it...

-M.O.L.L.E. Backpack
(19" X 15" X 8")
-*Kelty Zenith 2 Tent
(only weights around 5pounds, and has a full rain fly
-Highpeak Sirius Simex Sleeping Bag
(Pretty compact and rated to around 20 Deg.)
-S.O.G. Tools
(Shovel/Pick combo, Axe, saw)
-Pad for sleeping bag
-Footprint for tent
-Assorted lighters and pocket knives
-P-38 can opener
-Sharpening stone
-100' of 550 Paracord
-Vapur 16 oz collapsible water bottle
-Canteen
-First Aid
-Box of 30 Protein bars/Meal replacement bars

I would be addinga .40 Keltec Sub-2000 to this list but on my way to the firearms store (an hour away) they sold the last one, and I thought I finally had one...
Also a few other things I'm about to purchase poncho, machete, zip ties, duct tape, back pack cover, mess kit, water purifier, and molle pouches.

If you have any advice please let me know, I'm fairly new to this and would like to be prepared as well as possible.

Thanks guys...




 

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Water Treatment
shemagh
and something to boil water in a canteen cup or. A small kettle
A metal spork
Floss(multi use)
55 gallon drum liner
Different sizes ziplocks (use duct tape to wrap up a larger bag so it doesn't puncture a ziplock bag)
Gorrilla tape instead of the grey duct tape
 

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Freedom isn't free.
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A hat to keep the sun out of your eyes and off your face/neck. Tough work gloves. A linesman pliers. Small but bright flashlight (1 watt LED is good). Extra socks and underwear. A loud whistle. Compact binocular or monocular. Toilet paper.
 

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Go camping. If you've never done so.

If you have, you'll be able to answer a lot of your own questions about what you'll need for a BOB.

Looks like a good start. I'd dare say it looks like a lot of gear that might not be needed. trial and error is always best. the goal will be to keep weight/bulk to a minimum.

I'm a minimalist, I always try to carry something that is multipurpose. look to that with your choice of tools.

I carry a lightweight .22 revolver with an assortment of loads for small game. I'm BOBing, not looking for a gun fight. I will practice avoidance and concealment while in this mode. Conflict is not in my cards. I wouldn't advance into a conflict with a .40 cal anything. I would only advance and confront when I had the tactical upperhand, was on home turf and had a 100% chance of winning. Otherwise I would retreat.
 

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Load up your bag and see if everything you have (and want) will fit.

Just from your list, it looks like your bag is filling up pretty quickly.

-Trevor
 

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+1 on camping and hike to get there at least 2+ miles in, help with weight issues. Never hurts to go when it's raining, if it rains where you are. Setting up shelter, making fire, cooking, if you can learn to do those things in crappy weather you are that much better off. If you are accomplished in doing those things forgive me.
 

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Survivalist Electrician
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If you've already got the axe and saw, then why get a machete? Get a more versatile gun. A .40 cal pistol isn't a hunting gun. Maybe that gun along with a .223 rifle. After that, I would cut down on the load some. 30 protein bars?

Plus you've got a tent, sleeping bag, tent footprint and pad. I know that really makes camping more comfortable, but it's not necessary. If you're bugging out then you're on the move and you want a light load. I would ditch the tent and pad and keep a tarp or military grade poncho that you can make a shelter from. It's less comfortable, but multi purpose and lighter. Keeping the tent would be okay, but I would definitely ditch the pad and footprint. Make that part of your BOV setup.

A thick clear drum liner will make a good backpack cover, help in making shelter, or makeshift poncho and cost you less than any of those things.

Why do you need a mess kit if you plan on eating protein bars? Even if you fish or trap game you won't need it.

Which reminds me, you need some kind of small fishing set up. I have a little waterproof plano box that has fishing line, hooks, and sinkers in it and i keep two collapsible fishing rods and reels in bags in my house and truck that I can strap on to my main backpack depending on the situation.

A book with diagrams of snares, shelters, traps, how to make fire, etc.

Small vial of bleach.

Bandanas and wool caps.

There are a TON of threads on here about B.O.B.s. Check those out. A word of warning, you'll **** off some of the other members on here if you keep posting threads that have already been discussed. Search first. I use a google site search because the search function on here is lacking. Go to google and type in for example "site:survivalistboards.com bug out bags"
 

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Sibi Totique
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We often see this types of posts about Bug Out Bags; I have this what do I need? It’s basically impossible to give good advice if you don’t explain things like:
• What Types of Scenarios are you preparing for?
• What is your local setting?
• What types of Hazards and Threats is there where you live?
• What kind of terrain and seasonal variations do you encounter?
• How big is your budget?
• Are you building a BOB just for you or for a party?
• Your Personal Physical Fitness and Health
• Your Skills and Experience?

Some Articles on the Subject:
Building a Bug Out Bag on a Budget
Building The Right Bug Out Bag For You
Bug Out Guide and Checklist
The Bug Out Plan

In this case I would say that your question and how you put it’s actually more important than the answers you get. If you can really see the problem that you face from your unique situation you are already there. Good Luck!
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Since BOB setups are extremely individual, your ideal setup will be different from mine or someone else's. I second the suggestions of getting out there and actually using it. That's the only real way to find out what you will need, and what you can leave behind.

We had a thread a while back from a guy who was making his first BOB test run. He had to cut it short due to blisters. He also discovered that he had not properly prepared for biting insects. The blister issue may have caused him to lose his life if that had been an actual bug out situation. So it was great that he learned this ahead of time. His second attempt went much better.

This is the kind of stuff you need to know ahead of time. I do practice bug outs regularly using the same paths I would take. This lets me get to know my bug out paths intimately also. This is a good way to find out if there are any dangerous areas to avoid, find safe camping spots, etc. Most importantly, it lets you find those ideal places to cache supplies.

Caching is a good idea because it lets you start out light and mobile. Yet have more supplies available than you could have carried in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info and the links guys. I'll keep that in mind, the fishing stuff should have been on the list. In scouts we put fishing line and tackle in a film case and I'll either do that or get a retractable pole. The gun I refered to is actually IMO the ideal survival firearm. Its a 4 pound collapsible semi automatic rifle. Super accurate and dependable. Accurate up to 150 yards, and it comes in a 9mm.
 

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Thanks for the info and the links guys. I'll keep that in mind, the fishing stuff should have been on the list. In scouts we put fishing line and tackle in a film case and I'll either do that or get a retractable pole. The gun I refered to is actually IMO the ideal survival firearm. Its a 4 pound collapsible semi automatic rifle. Super accurate and dependable. Accurate up to 150 yards, and it comes in a 9mm.
Thats why everyone has differing opinions on a BOB and weapon.

I do not think the KT Sub2K is an ideal survivalist weapon. It tries to do two things but fails on doing anyone thing good enough. First it tries to be concealable, yet you have to pull it out of wherever you are stashing it and unfold and make ready to use. I can do this ALOT quicker with any semi-automatic handgun and be in and out of a firefight before you even have the Sub2K unfolded. Second it tries to be a rifle which again it fails at due to it being a pistol caliber carbine and pistol loads (IE: 40cal, 9mm) where not designed to be fired from longer barrels). Yes it can do it but it is not optimal. You say accurate out to 150yds, well my S&W M&P 9mm is body accurate to 150yds using a support and steady aim.

Again, this is in my opinion, in a BO in an urban area I would rather have a semi-automatic pistol for concealment and ease of access for a rapid deployment. In your instance it would be either concealed and slow deployment, or out in the open for rapid deployment. Not both.

In an wooded BO area I would much rather have a rifle of some sort, that way you could have range and concealment to work on your side. not to mention the benefit of a hunting firearm.

But hey thats what great about each individuals opinion and situation. And that is also why you need to be more specific in your BO plans, everyone can/will tailor their gear to different situations and what their skills allow.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Thanks for the info and the links guys. I'll keep that in mind, the fishing stuff should have been on the list. In scouts we put fishing line and tackle in a film case and I'll either do that or get a retractable pole. The gun I refered to is actually IMO the ideal survival firearm. Its a 4 pound collapsible semi automatic rifle. Super accurate and dependable. Accurate up to 150 yards, and it comes in a 9mm.
I chose a Kel-Tec SU-16 as my BOB gun for those same reasons. It's lightweight. It folds up short. But it also uses a rifle cartridge rather than a pistol round, so I have some effective range, which in my open terrain is mandatory.

I love my pistol caliber carbines, but in my situation, they're not suitable for what I need them for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks again, the criticism help me prepare more. I wanted to go with the rifle that used pistol mags so if i decide to carry my handgun with me I would only need to carry one caliber bullet and have interchangeable mags. Plus with it weighing around 4 pounds it wouldnt be too much of a burden. Thanks again, goes to show I have alot to learn...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh and Mike, are your pretty happy with the SU-16 overall? I was also looking at it but it was a bit heavier and cost a bit more too (which I'm fairly broke).
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Oh and Mike, are your pretty happy with the SU-16 overall? I was also looking at it but it was a bit heavier and cost a bit more too (which I'm fairly broke).
I really like it. I was pleasantly surprised. It's so light that it feels like a toy, so I didn't know what to expect. But it has proven itself accurate, reliable and quite durable. At this point, I can't think of a single gun I'd replace it with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Don't know your location, but you better check on that bag rating ... pretty sure those are 20 degrees Celsius, that's what, 68 degrees F? In addition, bags are typical rated for survival, not comfort.
I had some trouble finding exactly what te rating was, the nights here aren't very bad but in the winter it can get below zero. As I'm still learning I hope to work these kind of kinks out. I plan on taking a space blanket and wool socks to help out if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I really like it. I was pleasantly surprised. It's so light that it feels like a toy, so I didn't know what to expect. But it has proven itself accurate, reliable and quite durable. At this point, I can't think of a single gun I'd replace it with.
Well I might have to reconsider and get the SU if the price isn't too much. I liked the built in bi-pod. That would be pretty useful. I've heard nothing but good things about Keltec so I'll be going with one of the two models for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
How do you like those SOG tools? I am also in the market for those particular implements of destruction.
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=140045

I actually looked at this thread before I wasn't a member of the site at the time either back then. I think the reviews are a little too critical. The axe is small but I think people were expecting to much out of it. I'd give it an 8/10 its really sturdy and has a great grip. The shovel is much lighter than the military version but it's also not nearly as as strong. Yet one thing they failed to mention is that it can also be used as somewhat of a dull pick ax. Id give it a 5/10. Lastly the saw is a bit better than what they gave it credit for. It's not worth the money at all but it's fairly durable given it's inital feel, 6/10. I purchased all 3 for 39.99 which was a pretty good deal. Other than that I would say go with the axe and a military shovel if you plan on dealing with hard soil/clay.
 
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