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Preserve Protect & Defend
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I am sure this question has been asked and answered many times but what should I pack in my BOB as far as food goes? MREs? Freeze dried products? Or something else, maybe a combination?

This is the last thing I need to do to complete my bag and I am torn, your help would be appreciated. Thank you.
 

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Preserve Protect & Defend
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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah I've seen them around, certainly a possible element



I know I looking at trying to make about 3 days right?

I need some serious help, how much of what do you guys think I should have with me?
 

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BEEN HERE TO LONG
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get some of those high energy bars they sell them at the store here.
 

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i made up a mix of rice with freeze dried vegetables vacuum packed into 100g portions, energy bars, and marmite. for meat 227g cans of chopped pork.

drinks i have teabags (hey i am british sue me) and a mix of drinking chocolate/brown sugar/coffee whitener in vacuum packs

sachets of salt / sugar / coffee whitener etc in heavy duty ziplock bag

block of dried dates and barleysugar sweets in a pouch on my webbelt as a last ditch energy supply to keep me going if i lose my bob
 

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I am sure this question has been asked and answered many times but what should I pack in my BOB as far as food goes? MREs? Freeze dried products? Or something else, maybe a combination?

This is the last thing I need to do to complete my bag and I am torn, your help would be appreciated. Thank you.
for a BOB you want to have a mix of fast no cook foods(aka retorts or MRE's)
high cal/protien foods.
frezze dried for lightness and ease of cooking. or dried foods- aka- soup mixes, rice/noodles combos. like lipton/knoxx rice and pasta sides, packets of cup of soups etc.

protien/energy bars- aka- power/cliff bars

and some gorp or other form of trailmix.

the daytrex/mainstays can be put in for last ditch meals, but shouldnt be the only food packed. i thought they tasted funky .
 

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Getting Older
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Beef jerky and energy bars. Fruit juice and if the climate would permit I would carry milk. I would also include some bananas. Not the dehydrated chips but real bananas. On day three you can feast on the nasty MRE stuff.
 

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For BOB I go with a combo of freeze dried meals, mre crackers&cheese spread and an mre applesauce. Most is MH meals in the pro packs as they are light and compact. I want something simple to prepare and lightweight for BOB.

Patrol pack doesn't have the MH meals or the entrée but 5 sets of cheese and the crackers. Sometimes this changes tho.
 

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Make your own MRE's. I've been camping for 30 years. Grocery stores have never had the quality of light weight prepackaged food as they have today. Crackers and cheese, Can-less packages, protein bars, instant food. Hormel makes some good soft packages. 1 minute precooked rice. Dried fruit and nuts. Salmon and tuna packages. Instant potatoes. AND DO NOT FORGET THE COOKIES!!!!
I have often spent a few days in the woods on high protein diet with some carbs, and not having cookies was hell. Throw in some sugar free flavor packets for water.
 

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Foil packets of tuna with crackers, nuts, oatmeal packets, hot chocolate packets, hard candy, granola type bars, and salt, pepper, sugar and assorted condiment packets are a nice extra. I make my own MRE's packed in a zip lock bag. Even if your not bugging out, there are plenty of places hot water is available and to have a treat or a quick hot meal is nice to have on hand. I dig into my pack of "travel food" frequently. Cheaper than buying convenience store junk food and it lets me try new things and rotate food frequently for freshness.
 

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Bob foods

You should make sure to take into account what your bob is for, for example when i lived in the middle of the city my bag only contained energy bars and jerky as it was all meant to be eaten on the run as i got the hell outa the deathzone.

Now my pack is bigger and heavier as i'm in the country where I can just disapear into the woods and mountains and wont have to move as constantly.
 

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Watchin tha world go by
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i carry an oatmeal-sugar-cinnamon mix, a dry milk mix w protein powder and powdered choc mix, energy bars and a 20 oz bottle each of beans and rice.
 
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Your typical BOB is not designed as a permanent “heading for the hills” solution, but rather as a 72 hour kit. Following the rule of three’s, you can survive for three minutes without oxygen, three hours without shelter, three days without water, and three weeks without food. Generally we do not have to worry about oxygen, which makes water and shelter our top priority in a bug out situation. Food is not high on the list, because it takes at least three weeks to die from starvation. In a typical BOB, this means food is not essential, although it won’t be the most comfortable 72 hours you’ve spent. If you have ever watched episodes of Survivorman, Les Stroud usually eats little to no food for a week, but he still survives because he has his water and shelter requirements covered.

With that said, if food is included in a BOB, you do not have to eat three square meals a day which most of modern society is used to. The foods chosen need to be dense in calories and require little to no cooking. For cooking requirements, the most you should need is a small metal cup with a heat source long enough to bring the water to a rolling boil and pour your food in. Most iso/butane canister stoves on the market today, such as the MSR Pocket Rocket, can bring water to a boil in less than five minutes. A fuel canister is rated for up to 2 hours, which means it is good for almost 24 meals if you only need to bring the water to a rolling boil. Mileage on this will vary depending on the altitude and weather.

Ready-to-eat style foods include MREs, Life Boat Rations, beef jerky, Spam in foil packets or cans, tuna in foil packets and cans, Vienna Sausages, potted meat, crackers, cashews, peanuts, energy bars, granola bars, hard tack, etc. Quick cookable foods include instant white rice, dried instant mashed potatoes, couscous, instant farina (a.k.a. cream of wheat), Easy Mac-N-Cheese, instant oatmeal, Lipton Side Dish Meals (about $1.10 per pouch in grocery stores), and dehydrated camping food (Mountain House, Back Packer’s Pantry, etc.).

Also consider the storage conditions for your BOB. If it is kept in areas subject to high and freezing temperatures, such as a car, some of the ready-to-eat style foods will not last very long. It would be rather unfortunate to get food poisoning or diarrhea when you are running for your life from some impending doom.

My own preference is to go with dry, quick cookable foods, which do not include dehydrated camp food, due to a few reasons. First, they are not specialized items and can be found in any grocery store. Secondly, these foods are much cheaper than specialized field foods. This allows me to buy more, and more importantly, allows me to rotate the foods once they have reached their expiration date. Thirdly, these food items can withstand high temperatures and freezing conditions which most wet packed instant foods cannot. Fourthly, these are foods which I also eat on a daily basis, so it will not be a shock to my system if I suddenly switch my diet over to something else. Again, having a case of “the runs” is no fun in the field.

My food content tends to change from time to time, but usually revolves around instant white rice and farina as the basis. To this, I might add some cashews for a quick ready to eat snack or peanut butter in cold weather. Both are loaded with fat and calories, which is essential in cold weather. These foods are kept in 1 liter Nalgene bottles for two purposes. First, they are tough, water tight containers which will keep my food dry. Secondly, if need be, I can use the Nalgene bottles to hold water once the food has been eaten. In a 400mL Nalgene bottle, I keep some chicken and beef boullan cubs, salt, pepper, sugar (goes great with the farina in the morning), and tea packets. When it is cold out, I may add some cocoa packets to this bottle. Additionally, this bottle also serves as a cooking vessel. I’ll add my seasonings and dry food in this bottle, pour in some boiling water, and screw the cap back on. After several minutes, the food will have absorbed the hot water, in a similar fashion to the Mountain House style meals. In the meantime, the bottle can be used as a hand warmer or simply thrown into your pack while you continue your journey. When you are ready to eat, just pull out the bottle and you will have a piping hot meal ready.

If I am going out for a longer stretch of time, sometimes I’ll add another 1 liter Nalgene bottle of lentils. They do require about 20 minutes of cooking, but this is less of an issue if you pre soak them in a Nalgene bottle with water. Then you only need to add some boiling water as before and they should be nice and tender after 10 minutes. Again, these are cheap (under a dollar a pound) and a little goes a long way.
 

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I have some beef jerky, some fruit & nut granola bars, some chicken bullion, some beef bullion, some packets of apple cider mix, some tea bags (I'm not British, I just like tea), and a can of Spam.
 

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Earthwalker.
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I have some beef jerky, some fruit & nut granola bars, some chicken bullion, some beef bullion, some packets of apple cider mix, some tea bags (I'm not British, I just like tea), and a can of Spam.
TEA,SPAM,APPLE CIDER MIX?????Are you sure your not British because you sure have some British habits:D:
 

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Happiness is 2 at low 8
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Has anyone tried eating those 1200 calorie emergency rations? I've always been curious about those.
I tried one of the Datrex ration bars at a trade show a couple years ago, like DownInABunker said, they're alot like a light cookie, slight lemon flavor IIRC.

WRT the OP, in mine I have Instant Oatmeal pouches, Power bars & a couple Datrex 3600 cal bricks. The Oatmeal is easily fixed with some hot water, the power bars need no preparation and the Datrex bars round out the caloric requirements.

Allan
 

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Anything lightweight, and non-perishable. Starkist Tuna has a cool product called Lunch-To-go. It contains tuna, mayo, relish, crackers, a mint, a spoon, a napkin, and it's very lightweight. Just my two cents. :)
 
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