Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 307 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
986 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't care about who said it or trying to correct them in a thread, sometimes I just want to vent about it and thought a thread devoted to the purpose would be cathartic, entertaining, enlightening and might keep threads from going off track.

The idiom is to "make sense" not "since".

It's not "Must to do about nothing" it's "Much ado about nothing".
 

·
Non semper erit aestas.
Joined
·
3,918 Posts
It's :
"should've done something." Not "should of done something." "would've done something" not "would of done something." "Could've etc...."

Should've, would've, could've.
Short for "should have, would have, could have."

I'm no expert in music, but perhaps remembering a song title will help - Should've Said No (Taylor Swift).



Wary/weary/leery
(not leary)

If you are wary of something, you are watchful, cautious, alert.

If you are weary of something, you are tired of it. You can also be just plain weary (tired).

If you are leery you are cautious, distrustful, suspicious.

"I was leery of that young man who was hanging around the parking lot. His presence made me wary of possible trouble. When I got home I was so weary I went straight to bed."

I don't correct people on here, because I make my own mistakes. However there are certain errors which are seen over and over and I'm weary of them. :)

Thanks for allowing me to vent!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,565 Posts
We all make errors and fatigue (I couldn't sleep much tonight) and speed cause problems but there's also mistakes beyond being careless that indicate in some cases, a lack of education, a deliberate negligence of what is correct, or sometimes pure limitations. For some, it's a forced form of 'voice'.


Well, I use it for a credibility gauge.

If someone is discussing tracking techniques or how to grow something in difficult conditions and his or her grammar is terrible, that doesn't affect (they might write 'effect') that person's credibility in the subject from my perspective. It actually might add to their credibility because of their focus.

If someone is using 'clips' for magazines, carries 'bullets' (as opposed to rounds,) in their AK 'clips', calls that AK "Main Battle Rifle" because they think that term is cool and they don't know there's a specific definition for MBR's and makes other mistakes, they've got little or no credibility in that field...again, unless they're talking about specific experiences they've had with a specific firearm.

If we're discussing the importance of precious metals, it's interesting to see the often dramatic difference in writing skills and cognitive ability between those who understand the historic, social, and economic value of prepping in depth and those who have only the capacity to understand you can't eat gold or silver.
 

·
Why do you ask? 2 Dogs!
Joined
·
13,889 Posts
Whether it's laziness, ignorance or just plain stupidity

I hate when someone tries to "appear" smarter than you in their posts but then cannot spell.

I let it go and don't say anything, I am from the South, and our southern drawl makes a lot of folks appear slow when they are not

Lesson: If you're trying to seek an intellectual position over another watch your "p's" and "q's" and realize if you cannot spell properly, then sometimes the "higher" intellectual position you are seeking in written communication sends you to a lower position.

I've seen some folks with great communication skills, until you take away the teleprompter and then their stupidity comes out!
 

·
Improvise Adapt Overcome!
Joined
·
12,005 Posts
Aww, you edited it. It did say "Then Ball is red".

Jeez, we can't even complain correctly.
I'm a stinker, ain't I?


Oh, and back when I was in school, "Ain't" wasn't a word yet. Apparently it is now though.

Another thing, starting sentences with "But", "Or", and "And" were mortal sins...now it's legal and encouraged?

What are they teaching in school these days? Do they just hire any old block off the street to teach? Where did all the teachers go? How come they don't know the major grammatical rules?

It's NOT:
And the ball was red.

It's:
In addition, the ball was red.
 

·
Non semper erit aestas.
Joined
·
3,918 Posts
Look, I don't care what you youngins think. When I was in school, the period went AFTER the quotes, NOT inside of them!!

It's:
He said "The ball is red".

NOT:
He said "The ball is red."

That's just stupid.
Um.....
I'm older than you and the period has, since I was a child, gone inside the quotation marks. And to make sure I was correct before I wrote this post, I checked my copy of Warriner's 8th Grade English Grammar and Composition, 1963 edition. The rule of the period going inside the quoatation mark is there, rule 15d, on page 254. (So it's older than when either of us were in elementary school and in fact is older than you, but sadly it is not older than me.)

I do understand your feelings about it, but it's just one of those rules. If you have any old books you can double check. I'm going to go hunt now, just for my own enjoyment.

Yes, I'm geeky-weird. Can't help it. Takes all sorts, etc.
 

·
Improvise Adapt Overcome!
Joined
·
12,005 Posts
Um.....
I'm older than you and the period has, since I was a child, gone inside the quotation marks. And to make sure I was correct before I wrote this post, I checked my copy of Warriner's 8th Grade English Grammar and Composition, 1963 edition. The rule of the period going inside the quoatation mark is there, rule 15d, on page 254. (So it's older than when either of us were in elementary school and in fact is older than you, but sadly it is not older than me.)

I do understand your feelings about it, but it's just one of those rules. If you have any old books you can double check. I'm going to go hunt now, just for my own enjoyment.

Yes, I'm geeky-weird. Can't help it. Takes all sorts, etc.
Everyone I know, from my generation was taught to put it on the outside. The only time it goes inside, is if the quote is part of a larger sentence and needs separate expression.
 

·
Why do you ask? 2 Dogs!
Joined
·
13,889 Posts
I'm a stinker, ain't I?


Oh, and back when I was in school, "Ain't" wasn't a word yet. Apparently it is now though.

Another thing, starting sentences with "But", "Or", and "And" were mortal sins...now it's legal and encouraged?

What are they teaching in school these days? Do they just hire any old block off the street to teach? Where did all the teachers go? How come they don't know the major grammatical rules?

It's NOT:
And the ball was red.


It's:
In addition, the ball was red.

Don't forget about ending sentences with prepositions.....:D:
 

·
Improvise Adapt Overcome!
Joined
·
12,005 Posts
Um.....
I'm older than you and the period has, since I was a child, gone inside the quotation marks. And to make sure I was correct before I wrote this post, I checked my copy of Warriner's 8th Grade English Grammar and Composition, 1963 edition. The rule of the period going inside the quoatation mark is there, rule 15d, on page 254. (So it's older than when either of us were in elementary school and in fact is older than you, but sadly it is not older than me.)

I do understand your feelings about it, but it's just one of those rules. If you have any old books you can double check. I'm going to go hunt now, just for my own enjoyment.

Yes, I'm geeky-weird. Can't help it. Takes all sorts, etc.
Hmm, this is odd. I just went through a random sampling of book I have had since I was young. Half of them are one way, and the other are the other way.
 

·
Non semper erit aestas.
Joined
·
3,918 Posts
Hmm, this is odd. I just went through a random sampling of book I have had since I was young. Half of them are one way, and the other are the other way.
Hm yes that is very odd. What type of book was it?

I'll go get out my Lambs' Tales of Shakespeare now. (Sorry no italics, am on my phone. Lambs' is that way as there were two of them.)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,823 Posts
We all make errors and fatigue (I couldn't sleep much tonight) and speed cause problems but there's also mistakes beyond being careless that indicate in some cases, a lack of education, a deliberate negligence of what is correct, or sometimes pure limitations. For some, it's a forced form of 'voice'.


Well, I use it for a credibility gauge.

If someone is discussing tracking techniques or how to grow something in difficult conditions and his or her grammar is terrible, that doesn't affect (they might write 'effect') that person's credibility in the subject from my perspective. It actually might add to their credibility because of their focus.

If someone is using 'clips' for magazines, carries 'bullets' (as opposed to rounds,) in their AK 'clips', calls that AK "Main Battle Rifle" because they think that term is cool and they don't know there's a specific definition for MBR's and makes other mistakes, they've got little or no credibility in that field...again, unless they're talking about specific experiences they've had with a specific firearm.

If we're discussing the importance of precious metals, it's interesting to see the often dramatic difference in writing skills and cognitive ability between those who understand the historic, social, and economic value of prepping in depth and those who have only the capacity to understand you can't eat gold or silver.
Exactly! It's easy to tell that I'm experienced in chickens and gardens with only rudimentary knowledge about any guns except my own specific ones. Which is why I put my kids in the rifle club so they can learn better than I did all the 'details' to go along with it.

Although even the things I'm experienced with.... I don't often pay attention to or acknowledge 'technical terms' just because I'm a nutjob like that. I'm still going to call a 'crop' a 'feed sack'. Just because I can. But I would never call it a 'gut'.

Um.....
I'm older than you and the period has, since I was a child, gone inside the quotation marks. And to make sure I was correct before I wrote this post, I checked my copy of Warriner's 8th Grade English Grammar and Composition, 1963 edition. The rule of the period going inside the quoatation mark is there, rule 15d, on page 254. (So it's older than when either of us were in elementary school and in fact is older than you, but sadly it is not older than me.)

I do understand your feelings about it, but it's just one of those rules. If you have any old books you can double check. I'm going to go hunt now, just for my own enjoyment.

Yes, I'm geeky-weird. Can't help it. Takes all sorts, etc.
The rules for quotes follows common sense. If the statement or question is INSIDE the quote marks then the punctuation should also be INSIDE the quote marks.

She asked, "Will you still be my friend?"
Here the question is INSIDE the quote.
Do you agree with the saying, "All's fair in love and war"?
Here the question is outside the quote.

NOTE: Only one ending punctuation mark is used with quotation marks. Also, the stronger punctuation mark wins. Therefore, no period after war is used.
 
1 - 20 of 307 Posts
Top