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As I've posted before, I'm a relative newbie when it comes to chickens. I've been raising 6 chickens since they were one day old (March 1st). The chickens seem to be healthy and happy and at least 5 of them are now laying eggs. The chickens are contained in a chicken tractor, which I move every day, essentially giving them fresh grass to free range in each day. I have been feeding them Dumor chicken feed, lettuce, blackberries, strawberries, and oyster shells (since they began laying).

I've had two eggs in the last couple of days (presumably from the same chicken) that have streaks of blood in the egg white. Has anyone else seen this happen? Could this just be because it was this chicken's first couple of eggs? Anything to be concerned about?
 

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Nothing to be concerned about at all; just aesthetically not too pleasing. If you don't want to eat it (you could) pour it over the dog's food- he'd appreciate it; or cook it, mash it up and give it to your hens.
 

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Bush Walker
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blood is nothing - slept over a buddy's house as a boy - he raised chickens - breakfast egg cracking produced a partially formed chick......we ate waffles instead
 

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Whippersnapper
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blood is nothing - slept over a buddy's house as a boy - he raised chickens - breakfast egg cracking produced a partially formed chick......we ate waffles instead
Yeeehhh.... not pleasant.
our hens are with the cocks all the time and let them do their own thing- we crack all our eggs into a mug before use for inspection and a sniff check- just in case. we know which ones are sitting etc, but misstakes happen, and cracking a dead chick into your cake mix will give someone a bad day :xeye:

blood in the eggs is not an issue, but if we are giving them to other people we tend to disgard them.
 

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lotof times a blood spots meens it is a fertal egg if you collect your eggs every day itl be fine
 

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lotof times a blood spots meens it is a fertal egg if you collect your eggs every day itl be fine

Maybe, but I have no cocks in with my hens and I still see the occasional blood spot. As said before, back in the day you would often see this, but automation has taken the quesswork out of egg-producing...along with taste and lots of other things.
 

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Maybe, but I have no cocks in with my hens and I still see the occasional blood spot. As said before, back in the day you would often see this, but automation has taken the quesswork out of egg-producing...along with taste and lots of other things.
hence the lot of times and not all the time :thumb:

but you are right
 
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That was part of the reason eggs used to be candled. Essentially, it let you check for dark spots and other abnormalities inside the shell.
except blood spots are not an abnormality aand cannot be seen with a candler well you candle the eggs to see the developing chicks and tell wich ones are viable or not

thinkk of it like an ultra sound for a n egg but bloodspots are a no show
 
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blood spot can also be seen during a candling.
Catch em all the time with my girls.

That being said, I HOPE to catch those blood spots when I candle the 48 I placed in the incubator two nights ago
 

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lotof times a blood spots meens it is a fertal egg if you collect your eggs every day itl be fine
We have roosters in with our hens and commonly get the little blood spot of fertilised eggs.

If you do not have a rooster in with them you might watch to see if any any wild birds are getting in with them, many wild game birds can cross with chickens, the wifes grandma Edna was telling us about grouse fertilising her chickens.

We have also noticed that new layers can produce some off the wall, wierd egg abnormalities at first, I imagine because they are still developing.
 

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Whippersnapper
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We have also noticed that new layers can produce some off the wall, wierd egg abnormalities at first, I imagine because they are still developing.
Ha ha, yes we have those occasionally- teeny little eggs, long thin eggs, eggs with no yolk, ribbed eggs, and the ever welcome double yolker.
 

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I use a small powerful flashlight to see into the eggs. I have caught a lot of eggs that would disgust me to crack open.
 

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Non semper erit aestas.
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- we crack all our eggs into a mug before use for inspection and a sniff check- just in case. we know which ones are sitting etc, but misstakes happen, :

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I was taught by my mother to always crack eggs into a separate container in case they were bad, and then put them into whatever I was making.

I do like to fish out the blood spots (no cockeral here either) and one time there was a really bad egg - I was glad I caught it. It must have had a tiny crack in it and gone bad.
 

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It is an old wives tale that the ones with blood spots are fertilized.

Candling removes the big spots only.

You never see the tiny spots in commercial eggs because they usually sit on the shelves for MONTHS and the spots dissolve in that time.

They are caused by a broken blood vessel when the yolk is released from the ovary.

They are more common in chickens that are just starting to lay or are nearing their annual moult.

And, lastly the tendancy can be hereditary.

Let your girls lay a while longer before you get too concerned: blood spots ARE more common when the hen is beginning to lay. If you crack the egg into a bowl before you put it in the cake batter or whatever, you can remove and eggs with spots OR you can use the sharp edge of the shell to remove it.
 
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