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I know this has been mentioned in other posts, but with swimming pool supplies now available everywhere this time of year, I thought it deserved another mention.

http://readynutrition.com/resources...ium-hypochlorite-to-disinfect-water_19062010/

This article was originally posted at Survival Topics

Many ourdoorsmen, survivalists, and households preparing for emergency disasters rely upon common household bleach as a disinfecting agent to make water safe to drink.

EDIT do not copy / paste content from other sites
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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With so many new people coming on board, this info needs repeated regularly. I know I had been involved in survivalism for a long time and never knew about this. I consider it to be my number one discovery on this site!
 

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Maximus
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A little known problem with long term storage of bleach in your disaster emergency supply cache is that it degrades over time. Consulting a Chlorox bleach representative produced this statement:

“We recommend storing our bleach at room temperatures. It can be stored for about 6 months at temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. After this time, bleach will be begin to degrade at a rate of 20% each year until totally degraded to salt and water. Storing at temperatures much higher than 70 degrees Fahrenheit could cause the bleach to lose its effectiveness and degrade more rapidly. However, if you require 6% sodium hypochlorite, you should change your supply every 3 months.”
This is one of the reasons I do not stockpile liquid bleach (except for a new bottle every hurricane season).

But does anyone know HOW the bleach breaks down? Does it have to do with air contact? Or air coming through the seal/through the plastic? Or is it a chemical reaction that will occur even without air.

I was wondering and thinking if having some in glass bottles that are vaccum sealed would have any impact on the shelf-life. Just curious about that.
 

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Taoist
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This is one of the reasons I do not stockpile liquid bleach (except for a new bottle every hurricane season).

But does anyone know HOW the bleach breaks down? Does it have to do with air contact? Or air coming through the seal/through the plastic? Or is it a chemical reaction that will occur even without air.

I was wondering and thinking if having some in glass bottles that are vaccum sealed would have any impact on the shelf-life. Just curious about that.
I used to know this...I'm thinking that Sodium Hydroxide (bleach) is not the stablest of molecules...it's just going to break down by sitting there. Someone correct me if I'm wrong...I'd have to see the chemical formula for it. My chemistry is REALLY rusty.
 

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Taoist
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Now I feel pretty silly. Somehow I managed to miss that one all these years. Thanx for the info.
NP...just don't stock up on bleach...lol

Calcium hypochlorite has the bennies of an indefinite shelf life, and it only takes a couple of spoonfuls to make a few gallons of bleach. Great stuff. It's what they use to shock pools with when somebody takes a crap in the pool.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Now I feel pretty silly. Somehow I managed to miss that one all these years. Thanx for the info.
I used to stock bleach too. I knew it expired, and I replaced it yearly, but I didn't know of a better alternative until I first saw this posted a few months back. Instant solution to a major problem.
 

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Last of the First Line
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I used to know this...I'm thinking that Sodium Hydroxide (bleach) is not the stablest of molecules...it's just going to break down by sitting there. Someone correct me if I'm wrong...I'd have to see the chemical formula for it. My chemistry is REALLY rusty.
Bleach is Sodium Hypochlorite.

Sodium Hydroxide is lye, or "caustic soda".

Don't confuse the two - sodium hydroxide may kill bacteria and viruses in water (I don't know for sure), but I don't think you'd want to drink it. Easy way to burn your esophagus and stomach lining (and burn it all again on the way out when you vomit). :taped:
 

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Taoist
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Bleach is Sodium Hypochlorite.

Sodium Hydroxide is lye, or "caustic soda".

Don't confuse the two - sodium hydroxide may kill bacteria and viruses in water (I don't know for sure), but I don't think you'd want to drink it. Easy way to burn your esophagus and stomach lining (and burn it all again on the way out when you vomit). :taped:
My bottle of bleach says "Sodium Hydroxide".
 

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Just livin'
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I used to stock bleach too. I knew it expired, and I replaced it yearly, but I didn't know of a better alternative until I first saw this posted a few months back. Instant solution to a major problem.
YUP! Just goes to prove that no matter how well you think that you have things dialed down there is always another something to learn. I suppose thats why we hang out on sites like this.

I'm still feeling a bit chagrined. I'll get over it. My whites are REALLY gonna be white come next laundry day.:D:
 
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