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Skrama is way better unless you’re use to the kukri! I’ve had one strapped to my daily carried pack for about a year now. I put it there for a hike and just kind of left it there.

After hiking in the mountains last summer the Skrama and a wool Patoo just live in the pack full time!

SD
 

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I haven’t had the Skarma that long, but really liking it. It’s more of a wood-utility chopper whereas the traditional khukuri is both designed for both utility and as a weapon. IHMO, the khukuri is a better chopping tool given the weight-forward design, but the Skarma is no slouch either. As a wood working tool, the Skarma is much easier to wield and manage, especially on some smaller cutting tasks. I really like the longer handle on the Skarm which allows you a little longer reach and the blade profile makes it a natural design to effectively baton (if that’s your thing). I love the traditional convex grind found on upper tier khukuris and I think it’s a more robust, general purpose grind profile than the Scand-grind found the Skarma.

If I was sticking to a wooded, boreal, deciduous or coniferous forests and wood working, the Skarma is likely better suited and would make a better tool for that environment.




ROCK6
 

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I haven’t had the Skarma that long, but really liking it. It’s more of a wood-utility chopper whereas the traditional khukuri is both designed for both utility and as a weapon. IHMO, the khukuri is a better chopping tool given the weight-forward design, but the Skarma is no slouch either. As a wood working tool, the Skarma is much easier to wield and manage, especially on some smaller cutting tasks. I really like the longer handle on the Skarm which allows you a little longer reach and the blade profile makes it a natural design to effectively baton (if that’s your thing). I love the traditional convex grind found on upper tier khukuris and I think it’s a more robust, general purpose grind profile than the Scand-grind found the Skarma.

If I was sticking to a wooded, boreal, deciduous or coniferous forests and wood working, the Skarma is likely better suited and would make a better tool for that environment.

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[URL=https://app.photobucket.com/u/ROCK-6/a/271b716d-44d7-4c34-a8ad-89d5c6ef009a/p/8da2a9ae-e7fb-419b-aad3-01179b0b376e][/URL

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ROCK6
Hey Rock, you, uh, wouldn't be looking for a son to adopt or anything like that would ya'?
Lol! Nice collection! And yes, I know that's only a small piece of it.
 

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I have had khukukris for many years. Most do not get much or any use. When i reach for one I almost always grab the old indian army one that I have had for 40 years. I like the looks of the skrama but i keep over thinking it and putting off buying.
 

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Hey Rock, you, uh, wouldn't be looking for a son to adopt or anything like that would ya'?
Lol! Nice collection! And yes, I know that's only a small piece of it.
The youngest just finished college, commissioned an Infantry 2LT in the National Guard and just signed a contract with his college-town's PD. We need an empty nest for a bit ;)

Many of the weight-forward choppers are different from the traditional South American Latin-styled machetes which are often thinner without a heavier forward end. Some are more extreme like the khukuri or even the heavier Malaysian styled parangs and goloks. The thicker versions are more geared towards the hardwoods and thicker vines vice the green, leafy vegetation.

Some historians link the evolution to the influence from the kopis used by the Greeks or the macheria, a cavalry sword used in the army of Alexander the Great. Lots of speculation, but it's an old design rooted in combat, but has served a very effective tool in Nepal for hundreds of years. While most consider the khukuri more of a chopper, it's a very effective "stabbing" weapon as well as I've seen the demonstrations from the Gurkha troops. I've seen khukuris handled like extensions of the hand and while they have their reputation as a combat blade, they are considered very much a general purpose tool.

I'm pretty certain those that use the thicker, weight-forward parangs found throughout Southeast Asia use them similarly for general tasks.

The Skrama looks like it's basically a seax, and I'm a big fan of seaxes.
Actually the shorter versions of the seax were actually called a skramaxe. A lot of intriguing history here as well. It sounds like it started out as a weapon, but was also a very handy tool for agrarian societies. This Finnish design is very Scandinavian given the grind and having a completely covered tang (so it doesn't freeze to your hand!).

ROCK6
 

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The youngest just finished college, commissioned an Infantry 2LT in the National Guard and just signed a contract with his college-town's PD. We need an empty nest for a bit ;)

Many of the weight-forward choppers are different from the traditional South American Latin-styled machetes which are often thinner without a heavier forward end. Some are more extreme like the khukuri or even the heavier Malaysian styled parangs and goloks. The thicker versions are more geared towards the hardwoods and thicker vines vice the green, leafy vegetation.

Some historians link the evolution to the influence from the kopis used by the Greeks or the macheria, a cavalry sword used in the army of Alexander the Great. Lots of speculation, but it's an old design rooted in combat, but has served a very effective tool in Nepal for hundreds of years. While most consider the khukuri more of a chopper, it's a very effective "stabbing" weapon as well as I've seen the demonstrations from the Gurkha troops. I've seen khukuris handled like extensions of the hand and while they have their reputation as a combat blade, they are considered very much a general purpose tool.

I'm pretty certain those that use the thicker, weight-forward parangs found throughout Southeast Asia use them similarly for general tasks.



Actually the shorter versions of the seax were actually called a skramaxe. A lot of intriguing history here as well. It sounds like it started out as a weapon, but was also a very handy tool for agrarian societies. This Finnish design is very Scandinavian given the grind and having a completely covered tang (so it doesn't freeze to your hand!).

ROCK6
Simply based on my usage of the pattern, I think the seax design evolved as an economy of steel in an era where steel was extremely expensive. With the exaggerated clip/drop on the blade, especially with the "broken back" seax that everyone thinks of, you get a lot more blade length for the amount of steel. You get less weight for the same blade length too, which is appreciable in tools AND weapons. I think the seax evolved as equal parts tool and weapon, except for the obviously specialized versions like langseaxes and scramaseaxes.

I find their tip-forward geometry makes them extraordinarily sensitive, and they're my go-to blades for deboning meat and even cleaning large fish. I also find that their lightness allows speed to compensate for the lack of weight at the tip when chopping, provided the edge geometry lends itself to chopping. A seax won't outchop something like your Ontario Raider or anything else made to chop, but it can still chop with the best multi-purpose knives of similar size.

The tip looks like a weak point, but unless the drop is just absolutely ridiculous it's as strong as any other knife tip. I've batoned my custom through wood that left only 3/4" of the tip exposed with no ill effects.
 

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Hey Rock6, about that Al mar you have ......... this did not occur from abuse, rather it happened during light chopping. Needless to say I was disappointed.

View attachment 367738

View attachment 367739
Ouch! Yeah, I like that design, but surprised it failed like that. It's old school Al Mar and quality Japanese-made. Definite signs of heat-treatment failure. I haven't used my a ton and it's what I have considered getting rid of because I don't keep to many 'collector' pieces.

That failure would really suck...

ROCK6
 

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Actually the shorter versions of the seax were actually called a skramaxe. A lot of intriguing history here as well. It sounds like it started out as a weapon, but was also a very handy tool for agrarian societies. This Finnish design is very Scandinavian given the grind and having a completely covered tang (so it doesn't freeze to your hand!).
You are correct. A common memento a farmer took from war was a broken sword. It would then be used as an axe or machete type tool.

Fast forward a few hundred years. Before Varusteleka made Skrama, they sold Hukari by Taiter. It literally looked like a broken sword.
Material property Cross Symbol Event Metal

Later the manufacturer changed the handle material from soft rubber to hard plastic, at that point Varusteleka stopped selling that knife. Soon after they announced that they are making their own version.

Result was Skrama:
Gesture Automotive exterior Auto part Font Rectangle

Similar basic construction but modernized.

Hukari and skrama (skramasaksi, scramasax) are also names for short swords.

A bonus tool from the north, Sami knife
Gesture Finger Wood Thumb Blade
Natural material Kitchen utensil Tool Metal Titanium

Those come in several different sizes, large ones are about same as large Skrama. Made for chopping wood and reindeer bones. Since they also look really pretty they are common as souvenirs. I want one but I would not dare to use it :D The large ones are often coupled with a smaller knife.
 

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You are correct. A common memento a farmer took from war was a broken sword. It would then be used as an axe or machete type tool.

Fast forward a few hundred years. Before Varusteleka made Skrama, they sold Hukari by Taiter. It literally looked like a broken sword.
View attachment 453132
Later the manufacturer changed the handle material from soft rubber to hard plastic, at that point Varusteleka stopped selling that knife. Soon after they announced that they are making their own version.

Result was Skrama:
View attachment 453133
Similar basic construction but modernized.

Hukari and skrama (skramasaksi, scramasax) are also names for short swords.

A bonus tool from the north, Sami knife
View attachment 453134 View attachment 453135
Those come in several different sizes, large ones are about same as large Skrama. Made for chopping wood and reindeer bones. Since they also look really pretty they are common as souvenirs. I want one but I would not dare to use it :D The large ones are often coupled with a smaller knife.
Yeah, I always thought the Skarma had some of its lineage tied to the Seax, but its more utilitarian than weapon these days.

ROCK6
 

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At the risk of getting berated for Threadnomancy... I'm partial to a kukri, despite its purported lineage if you watch any videos on Rural Nepal you'll see it being used for everything from preparing dinner to building fences and chopping firewood.

The kukri suits my needs even without a utility knife, I like the look of the skrama but can't justify buying it to my self.
 

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I've never been a fan of kukris, and I am gravitating more and more towards wharncliffe/sheeps foot/cleaver style blades for general purpose usage. So, the choice between those two would be obvious for me.
 

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Just some of my thoughts between the two. Using a Condor kukri instead of a traditional version which are a little more handmade to keep comparisons the same.




Most kukris have the recurved blade, convex grind with a forward heavy end that does lend itself to being a better chopper than the Skarma. The recurve and convex grind can be problematic for some to sharpen, but once you understand the differences, they're pretty easy to maintain. I find the convex edge profile more utilitarian than the Scandinavian grind of the Skarma; simply more robust once you get beyond just cutting wood.

The (Condor) kukri is full, flat tang and is heavier than the Skarma. The balance is a little harder to get use to and the angle can get tiresome if you're clearing lighter vegetation. The end of the blade has some upswept profile to it, which makes it easier to skin game or gut a fish. The wider profile blade is easier to grasp in your hand for fine/blade-tip work.

The Karma is well balance, while full-tang, it's thinner, but still seems similarly robust. The fully enclosed handle would be much better in colder temperatures if not using gloves. The longer handle does give you more handling options and extended reach. The lighter profile that is more "traditional" vice the kukri's angled handle does make the Skarma a better "machete" when used to clear tall grasses and lighter vegetation; your handle doesn't get as fatigued. A pseudo sheep's foot/wharncliffe edge profile does have good piercing qualities and the full length edge profile really makes some wood working tasks easier. While not as wide as the kukri blade, you can still grasp the back of the blade, near the tip, for finer, controlled work.

The edge profile is excellent for wood work, but not always as robust as other grind profiles beyond just wood. The edge profile is pretty straight forward; Scandi-grind with a slight secondary bevel, and pretty easy to sharpen with a flat stone.

Both are excellent, larger, longer, effective choppers for wood work and your typical, bigger chopping survival/bushcraft tasks. If predominantly in the woods, such as a boreal forest, the Skarma is a great choice. If you traversing different environments, the kukri is probably a little more versatile despite the more drastic recurve profile. I think the convex edge of the kukri, for me, is just a little more utilitarian than a Scandi-grind.

ROCK6
 

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Just some of my thoughts between the two. Using a Condor kukri instead of a traditional version which are a little more handmade to keep comparisons the same.




Most kukris have the recurved blade, convex grind with a forward heavy end that does lend itself to being a better chopper than the Skarma. The recurve and convex grind can be problematic for some to sharpen, but once you understand the differences, they're pretty easy to maintain. I find the convex edge profile more utilitarian than the Scandinavian grind of the Skarma; simply more robust once you get beyond just cutting wood.

The (Condor) kukri is full, flat tang and is heavier than the Skarma. The balance is a little harder to get use to and the angle can get tiresome if you're clearing lighter vegetation. The end of the blade has some upswept profile to it, which makes it easier to skin game or gut a fish. The wider profile blade is easier to grasp in your hand for fine/blade-tip work.

The Karma is well balance, while full-tang, it's thinner, but still seems similarly robust. The fully enclosed handle would be much better in colder temperatures if not using gloves. The longer handle does give you more handling options and extended reach. The lighter profile that is more "traditional" vice the kukri's angled handle does make the Skarma a better "machete" when used to clear tall grasses and lighter vegetation; your handle doesn't get as fatigued. A pseudo sheep's foot/wharncliffe edge profile does have good piercing qualities and the full length edge profile really makes some wood working tasks easier. While not as wide as the kukri blade, you can still grasp the back of the blade, near the tip, for finer, controlled work.

The edge profile is excellent for wood work, but not always as robust as other grind profiles beyond just wood. The edge profile is pretty straight forward; Scandi-grind with a slight secondary bevel, and pretty easy to sharpen with a flat stone.

Both are excellent, larger, longer, effective choppers for wood work and your typical, bigger chopping survival/bushcraft tasks. If predominantly in the woods, such as a boreal forest, the Skarma is a great choice. If you traversing different environments, the kukri is probably a little more versatile despite the more drastic recurve profile. I think the convex edge of the kukri, for me, is just a little more utilitarian than a Scandi-grind.

ROCK6
May I ask the thickness on the skrama?
 

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I kind of forgot that I do have one Sami knife. It has my name engraved on the other side of the blade but I don't even remember when or where I got this, it has to be like 30 years old (I'm almost 50 now, time flies..). It is just too beautiful to use. My father has a large (Skrama sized) he bought like 40 years ago when we visited Lapland in the early 80's.

This one is just a regular puukko size, about 4" blade I'd guess.

Wood Musical instrument Art Font Wind instrument
 
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