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Retreat hell!!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Obviously boiling is a great way , I wonder how really useful the Water Purifier Tablets are , I seem to remember vaguely we used them in the Marines but as I recall they had a bad taste and were cloudy, I seen these ones called : Aquamira Water Purifier Tablets , It says one tablet is good for a litre of water , thats not bad at all , it claims the water doesnt have an odd taste and its clear , Anyone ever use these?

What other ways , I used to have a Katdyn water filter , that thing was awesome , you could use it over and over again plus it would store easy , the only thing that concerned me at first was it had ceramic guts , which I though could easily break , but it never did , its pretty rugged !

I will probably get another one , they are in the range of $150 + but worth it , the Aquamira tabs are only $28 bucks for 50 , I may try these as well , but they both have a different purpose to some extent , the tabs can go anywhere with you , like a firestarter and compass , Knife and gun , should all be inside your load bearing vest at all times!

Anyone use a different methods of water purification?
 

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Boiling is great for a survival situation, but if you're backpacking or camping, there really is no reason to JUST boil it. While it's possible to find clear water in the field, but a lot of the time, it will be brownish or have things floating around in it (you probably know that). Even collecting rain water will result in little bits and pieces floating around in it if you are in the forest because the water will run down the sticks and leaves of the canopy.

My solution: pack some coffee filters. They really take up almost no room in your pack. After you collect and boil your water, run it through a coffee filter as you pour it in your canteen and you will have safe-to-drink water that's actually CLEAN.
 

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I use the Katadyn hiker pro, but carry tabs and iodine also. Just depends on what water I am dealing with. You can never go wrong with boiling, it is probably the best way to purify water, if you have time and fuel and of course something to boil it in.
 

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The tablets I use are the Micro Pur. They don't make the water taste funny. I can't stand the iodine tabs. They make me not to even want to drink water.

I much prefer to filter though. Unless there is a major catastrophe, viruses aren't really a concern for backcountry water sources in the US, and a quality filter will take care of all the other bugs that will make you sick. If you are paranoid about viruses, after filtering, drop a micro pur tab in, wait 5 minutes and get your fill of water...
 

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TEXAS!!!
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Boiling is great for a survival situation, but if you're backpacking or camping, there really is no reason to JUST boil it. While it's possible to find clear water in the field, but a lot of the time, it will be brownish or have things floating around in it (you probably know that). Even collecting rain water will result in little bits and pieces floating around in it if you are in the forest because the water will run down the sticks and leaves of the canopy.

My solution: pack some coffee filters. They really take up almost no room in your pack. After you collect and boil your water, run it through a coffee filter as you pour it in your canteen and you will have safe-to-drink water that's actually CLEAN.
Rainwater must be boiled. Birds crap on your roof and in your gutters.
 

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Why spend the money on filters when you can make one for free pretty much. Does the same job and never needs to be replaced as the materials are always at hand. Boiling only takes a few minutes. Put the water on go gather some more wood or some other task come back and waters purified. I can filter and boil a gallon of water in less than an hour. Whats the big hurry anyway. I'm out to enjoy myself.
 

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Rainwater must be boiled. Birds crap on your roof and in your gutters.
I actually assumed that this was for a camping scenario, not collecting water at home. Usually, when camping, it's possible to use a poncho to collect rainwater by directing it into a pot using the poncho. I usually boil it because I've almost always been under the cover of trees when collecting the rainwater, and I've never actually collected rainwater in an open field using a poncho. I'm not sure if it's safe to drink straight out of the sky.
 

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Contego Libertas
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I actually assumed that this was for a camping scenario, not collecting water at home. Usually, when camping, it's possible to use a poncho to collect rainwater by directing it into a pot using the poncho. I usually boil it because I've almost always been under the cover of trees when collecting the rainwater, and I've never actually collected rainwater in an open field using a poncho. I'm not sure if it's safe to drink straight out of the sky.
I would STILL boil it. When I was in the Army we had a hard time getting a water resupply while on maneuvers in Spain(trying to impress the King so Spain would Join NATO). However it did rain and almost everyone gathered water as you suggest, with a poncho. Our entire Battalion came down with Dysentery. NOT A pleasant thing I assure you. Had this happened in a different scenario people could have died. Our medics became our second best friends....right after the Porta-potties they had to move in for us, about 70 all tolled.
 

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I need to ask some old timesr back home how they did water out of the cisterns that a lot of people had, an this all came from the house roofs. I'd think most boiled for drinking.
 

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I would STILL boil it. When I was in the Army we had a hard time getting a water resupply while on maneuvers in Spain(trying to impress the King so Spain would Join NATO). However it did rain and almost everyone gathered water as you suggest, with a poncho. Our entire Battalion came down with Dysentery. NOT A pleasant thing I assure you. Had this happened in a different scenario people could have died. Our medics became our second best friends....right after the Porta-potties they had to move in for us, about 70 all tolled.
That's a problem with pure water. I don't think that boiling it would have helped. Submariners have to put some sea water in to keep from giving the crew the runs.

It's not that the water itself is dangerous, but the lack of minerals is. We need to "eat a little rock" to stay healthy.

How to do that is a question if rain and distillate is all you have.
Boil rocks?
 

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TEXAS!!!
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That's a problem with pure water. I don't think that boiling it would have helped. Submariners have to put some sea water in to keep from giving the crew the runs.

It's not that the water itself is dangerous, but the lack of minerals is. We need to "eat a little rock" to stay healthy.

How to do that is a question if rain and distillate is all you have.
Boil rocks?
I stone boil all water when camping. I get a bunch of softball to baseball sized round rocks, heat them real good in the fire, fill a two or three gallon metal container with water, pull out hot rocks one at a time, dust them off real good quickly and drop the rocks in the water one at a time CAREFULLY, until it comes to a boil. I then drain water into another container, let it cool, then drink it. Plenty of minerals, no pathogens.

Caution, Some rocks will explode when you do this, but not enough to injure you, just scare the crap out of you.
 

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Katadyn Pocket Microfilter. There is no better value out there. It is designed to filter an insane 13000 gallons of water before you have to replace the ceramic filter. That's a life time of use even if you spend most of your time in the wilderness.

I have one and I never venture into the bush without it. It's relatively expensive but, man...it's totally worth every penny. It filters down to 0.01 microns and that pretty much eliminates 99.99% of bacteria that could be found in water.

Spend the money. It's all you'll ever need for water purification on the move. It's the size of two coke cans stacked on top of eachother and it packs really well.

 

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Retreat hell!!
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I totally agree with you on the Katdyn! it just works!

I would say the prification tablets could be useful as well , because you can keep them on you at all time ,if you get hurt and cant really move (get back to camp or and accident on the road) these could be life savers , but all around the Katadyn beats em , worth the money dont leave home without it!
 

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Big discount on Katadyn Pocket and Hiker

If you do the math, you are way better off with a filter over the tablets, not to mention you won't be drinking chemicals. The tablets are fine for emergency use, but I would not want to drink chemically treated water all the time. And for me, burning fuel to purify water is not a good option. Filtering is easy, effective, and produces a great tasting end product. You can get gravity bags that treat water almost effortlessly.

The Katadyn Pocket is a great filter, but most of us can't afford one. The price keeps rising on them, although I doubt they are gonna rise again anytime soon. I think if anything, Katadyn should lower their msrp, as sales have stagnated due to the price.

I still have some that I bought before the last price increase and though Katadyn is watching my prices and enforcing their pricing policy, I am offering a discount code to offset the high msrp. Even my discount of $50 hasn't helped sales much, so today I am increasing the discount to $70! Plus I'm offering free shipping! Your total: $279.95! (WA state residents subject to sales tax.) This discount is only good today, August 3.

The discount code is PKTSVR. You need to input that at check out to get the discount. I doubt you can find a better price on the web and I will ship out today or tomorrow if you order today.

I've also got a good selection of Sawyer products which are excellent filters and purifiers for a very reasonable price.

Katadyn Hikers are currently on sale for a great price too!

Check out my site at Highwater Filters.
 

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Maximus
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Obviously boiling is a great way , I wonder how really useful the Water Purifier Tablets are , I seem to remember vaguely we used them in the Marines but as I recall they had a bad taste and were cloudy, I seen these ones called : Aquamira Water Purifier Tablets , It says one tablet is good for a litre of water , thats not bad at all , it claims the water doesnt have an odd taste and its clear , Anyone ever use these?
I like to carry both just in case but I use the filter primarily. The water tabs are only for those cases that I can't stop to remove my filter, pump the water, put stuff away. Of course there would be no time to gather wood, start a fire, and boil a liter either. So if I am really going to "Dip and go", then I would use a tablet.
 

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Sugar-free
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I just posted this on another thread, but solar disinfection works very well. Clear plastic bottles sitting in the sun for 6 hours will sterilize the water inside by UV radiation. 2 days under overcast skies will do it too. This method is used extensively in 3rd world countries, but you hardly ever hear about it here.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_water_disinfection
 

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I would STILL boil it. When I was in the Army we had a hard time getting a water resupply while on maneuvers in Spain(trying to impress the King so Spain would Join NATO). However it did rain and almost everyone gathered water as you suggest, with a poncho. Our entire Battalion came down with Dysentery.....
I'm no doctor, but I'd bet that the microbes were on the ponchos, hands and canteens collecting the water. Not in the rainwater.

The ease with which dysentery is transmitted in camps where sanitation is questionable leads me to think that anyone else would then catch it from those already infected.
 

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Contego Libertas
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I'm no doctor, but I'd bet that the microbes were on the ponchos, hands and canteens collecting the water. Not in the rainwater.

The ease with which dysentery is transmitted in camps where sanitation is questionable leads me to think that anyone else would then catch it from those already infected.
You're probably correct. I would still think that it was from that location. Once troops come out of the field they clean their equipment. Even assuming that some didn't, it would not have been as widespread as it was, IF it weren't from that location.
 

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This site sucks
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I stone boil all water when camping. I get a bunch of softball to baseball sized round rocks, heat them real good in the fire, fill a two or three gallon metal container with ?water, pull out hot rocks one at a time, dust them off real good quickly and drop the rocks in the water one at a time CAREFULLY, until it comes to a boil. I then drain water into another container, let it cool, then drink it. Plenty of minerals, no pathogens.

Caution, Some rocks will explode when you do this, but not enough to injure you, just scare the crap out of you.
Why? Seems like a total waste of time and energy. Why not just boil the water?
 
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