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Discussion Starter #1
Was looking thru the older posts in hopes of finding this and kinda gave up. I've got some good preps for food, now I need a way to cook them. Does anyone have any experience they can share for a good multi-fuel stove? What's the most readily available/salvageable kind of fuel out there? What fuel do houses get anyway? Would propane be a good idea or one of those brand specific fuels? I've looked at the MSR dragonfly or the Coleman Mutli-fuel stove..but have no idea on how practical they would be in application. It does seem good that they can burn unleaded gasoline (but these would be hard to find anyway in a shtf scenario) so maybe a fuel specific for cooking use would be easier to find? I don't know and I'm getting nowhere with my research. Any help would be greatly appreciated!:upsidedown:
 

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Sibi Totique
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Multi-Fuel stoves? Optimus makes some interesting models like Nova and Hiker+.
http://www.optimusstoves.com/seen/o...ts/katadynshopconnect/optimus-outdoor-kocher/

MSR also makes high quality stoves, maybe the XGK?
http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/stoves/category

I personally would not go for a multi fuel stove if you are going to use it indoors. The smell of kerosene or other fuels indoors is not that nice. Why not go for a propane stove with double burners like the Oden Stove from Primus?
http://www.primus.eu/templates/pages/3_cols_white_middle.aspx?sectionid=5888

A wood stove is another really interesting alternative if you are living in a setting where you can find firewood. Can provide both heat and the ability prepare food. The Heat-Pal is another alternative that works both like a heater and stove. The Stoves From Trangia is stabil and includes cooking vessels, much cheaper than a multi-fuel stove and practical.

Have you checked out military surplus? Here in Scandinavia some really interesting alternatives can be found really cheap. Includes everything you need and is perfect for a whole family. Two examples:

Kokutrusting 10/B http://www.millesvik.com/visabegbild.asp?bild=bild188.jpg&rub=Kokutrustning

Kantin 10 B/S http://www.surplus.se/components/co.../product/715d0afcd49c2ff2521abb23331cc304.jpg

Longer article that I written about the subject: http://sibitotique.blogspot.com/2009/12/food-starvation-and-famine-crisis.html
 

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One of the problems with the MSRs is that they do flare up on starting and it is not hard to overprime them such that fuel leaks around the stove. You certainly would want to have them in an area where 3 feet of flame or the base of the stove having leaked fuel on fire isn't going to catch something on fire.

One advantage of one of the Optimus multi-fuel stoves is that it can run on a canned pressurized gas (a mix of butane and propane). This would possibly work with propane, which would be an advantage inside a house, plus you have one more fuel you can burn. Also, I have read that it is much easier to tune the flame of the Optimus than say an MSR XGK - which is something to consider for long term cooking where you know how to cook and you are not just heating something.

Me, I use the XGK because it is more robust.
 

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+1 XGK if you want to go with liquid fuels; its really versatile that way, and packs easy, although you'd have to be able to take or acquire liquid fuels. (siphon hose, etc.)

Another +1 on the propane burner. You can get an adapter that hooks up the big grill tanks to a coleman stove. I actually have a small hoard of large tanks that folks throw out when they move as some moving companies won't move compressed gas items. Cheap to fill. You can also get another adapter that fills the small green camping tanks from the large white tanks so if you have to take it with you, get the cheap $5 burner that screws onto the green bottle and you're good as long as you can scrounge off of grill tanks. After the dust settles, those grill tanks might be valuable finds.

After that, I'd suggest a wood gasifier, like the Bushwacker or the Brush Buddy, or make one. You can also use a small pop can alcohol burner in conjunction with those. If you live in a cramped urban environment like me, you can still scrounge up a lot of wood bits - only takes 100g to boil a couple cups of water - and keep some alcohol for the small burner. It doesn't put out as much smoke as a hobo stove or campfire, doesn't leave much waste to try and get rid of, and you can take it with you and pretty much find wood anywhere.

You'll notice my theme of "take it with you" because I assume I will not be able to bug in indefinitely.
 

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The majority of the world doesn't have electricity so they use a variety of kerosene stoves for cooking.

I purchased a "Butterfly" stove to use in case of power outage along with my 23,000BTU kero heater and lamps I purchased at Lehman's.

I figure I am well covered in the event of a power disruption.
 

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traveler
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One of the problems with the MSRs is that they do flare up on starting and it is not hard to over prime them such that fuel leaks around the stove. You certainly would want to have them in an area where 3 feet of flame or the base of the stove having leaked fuel on fire isn't going to catch something on fire.
Right, the first time I fired up mine I set the picnic table on fire. Lesson learned: practice and know how to use your equipment before you need it. :thumb:

Stoves are one of my obsessions though, I have several types, but I think if I had to pick only one it would be the MSR multifuel, or just build a quick fire hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the ideas. I am making plans to build and test out a soda can stove (watched the videos already). This would be ideal for my case, I need a cheap fuel stove with not much smoke and not take up much space to store. It would be used in a very dense urban setting and the smell of smoke is undesirable and attracts attention, plus I have no room in the apartment. I am willing to get a small stove like from Primus, but the price is prohibitive. It may be worth it if such a stove which uses their proprietary fuel cans can be attached with some adaptor and can then use propane tanks which I may scavenge from nearby areas. I plan on having the stove(s) as a backup if the grid goes out short term or if shtf long term and I need to bug in indefinitely.

How does propane fuel work anyway? It's not liquid isn't it? ...may sound stupid but I feel am asking the right people here...
 

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Geronimo!
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Stoves are one of my obsessions though, I have several types, but I think if I had to pick only one it would be the MSR multifuel, or just build a quick fire hole.
I'm the same way. I have never figured out why I am so obsessed with it other than maybe it was because of all the days in the field eating cold C-Rats out of a can and thinking, "when I get out I will never again eat cold food in the field."

But I have a lot of different stoves, several different grills, two different kinds of stove tops in the kitchen even and am about to remove the standard electric and install one of the new induction models while keeping the two burner gas top we have. We're even thinking about having a pizza oven installed over the fireplace plus we're looking at investing in an old wood stove at the BOL.

Yeah, I'm stove obsessed too. Heck, I've got Kelly Kettles and Wiggy's, Jet boils even because I really like the canister stove concept for cooking in a pinch and it has always lookked - I never stop looking for new stoves.

I like the MXRs and the Bruntons when it comes to liquid fuel stoves, and the Opitmus Novas. Bought one of the Novas used on eBay and liked it so much I bought another one new when they came out with the Plus. I like that all of the above nest in my titanium pots - that's big to me.

Honestly, you cannot go wrong with most of them these days. But with stoves, you need redundancy. I've read a lot of good things about the Colemans too - they seem to have come a long ways.
 
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off-grid organic farmer
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The Petromax Brytelit has an option where you can use it as a one-burner cook stove.

I have one, though we use it for light.

They burn all flammable liquids [gas, kerosene, lard, veggie oil, ...]

:)
 

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I have a Coleman white gas 'camp' stove something like this too:



I don't like it. For one thing it is awkward to use, especially if you have to re-pressurize the tank to keep it going because it is so close to the heating element. Also, that fuel being so close to the heating element is a fire or explosion hazard if you have leaks or spillage. I once had the whole stove on fire.

With a separate tank for fuel you generally have some extra safety space even if there is spillage/etc. because the flames usually don't get back to the bottle - although I have seen melted pumps on MSRs. I just think that Coleman is less safe.

Personally, for home use, I would consider a home BBQ unit that runs on propane, especially if I had propane coming to my house already. Then I would have a bottle or two just for the case where the propane may stop flowing to your house - although those bottles are an explosion hazard if someone shoots them with tracer/incendiary ammo (kind of unlikely). As a backup I would consider something like this:



I believe you can get them in both propane and gasoline. Get one of each, they are fairly inexpensive and a lot of people have used them for cooking a lot, including myself.

Finally, there is this option:



You can buy them with a stove adapter and use that for cooking.

I have lit mine up twice, but never used it for cooking - yet. They do put out a lot of heat and light.
 

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How does propane fuel work anyway? It's not liquid isn't it? ...may sound stupid but I feel am asking the right people here...
Propane is generally stored as a compressed gas, although in some containers it may be LP or liquid propane - usually where they want to store a lot in a small space, like on a car or fork lift. When you have an LPG tank then there is usually some mechanism to change the liquid back into a gas. This you probably would not have to deal with unless you have a large tank out in the boonies to fuel your house, and maybe not even then.
 

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I don't wanna talk about
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...and can virtually use any liquid flammable ....
Can you post a video of YOU using that stove with unleaded or white gas? Or diesel or acetone or paint thinner or or or. It's bad form to tell people it's a good idea to make a bomb without telling them they are making a bomb.
 

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+1 for the MSR dragonfly. Used one backpacking for years and loved it!! Only had 1 problem when we were out west. Had some trouble at higher altitudes but then again, if you're used to it, I'm sure it'll be fine.
 

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You got to love it!
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Another alternative is to buy one of these:

Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case


They are really cheep and use butane. The fuel looks like a hair spray can. It cooks amazing hot and quick. For around $26 you can't go wrong. We have one and use it quite frequently. The butane burns so clean you don't have to worry about fumes like you would with propane. We set it up on the table and cook up some nabe or sukiyaki.

I mean for something that you can use as a back up it's perfect.
 
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