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Always Loaded
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I've grown weary of working with inexpensive once fired brass. Even using decent LC I'm getting fliers. I'm basically down to Lapua, Starline, or Peterson. The Peterson seems to be the best stuff out there, but finding it in stock is troublesome. I also would prefer to get brass cut for large primers, as I have a surplus of them. Firearms are a Rem 700 SPS and a PSA 18" AR10. Any thoughts?
 

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I've grown weary of working with inexpensive once fired brass. Even using decent LC I'm getting fliers. I'm basically down to Lapua, Starline, or Peterson. The Peterson seems to be the best stuff out there, but finding it in stock is troublesome. I also would prefer to get brass cut for large primers, as I have a surplus of them. Firearms are a Rem 700 SPS and a PSA 18" AR10. Any thoughts?
Brownells has Lapua in stock. Peterson is great (I’ve got it for my 260).


That said, I’ve used once fired LC brass for some of my best results. I did anneal them (Giraud/Annie induction), turn the necks and sort.
 

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"Preferred Brass
For a 6BR, there is one clear choice in brass--Lapua, with Norma the only real second choice. For the .308 Winchester, choice of brass is not so simple. Most of the .308 Win precision shooters we've interviewed do prefer Lapua brass, but others are very happy with Norma, Winchester, Hornady Match and even Remington. Black Hills uses Winchester-made brass for its match ammo, which is capable of .5 MOA or better in many rifles. The main advantage of Lapua brass is consistency and quality. Case-wall thickness is very uniform and most lots have shown less variation in weight than other headstamps. But Winchester brass performs very well in the .308. And, at $24/100, Winchester costs 40% less than Lapua brass. Even if you can potentially get more loadings out of a Lapua case, Winchester brass offers more bang for the buck. You'll find a lot of once-fired Federal Gold Medal Match brass available. While it tends to shoot accurately, we've found GMM brass is relatively soft compared to Lapua or Winchester, so the primer pockets tend to loosen up after just three or four reloadings.


In addition to commercial brass, many .308 Win shooters reload boxer-primed military cases such as Lake City, IMI, and Hirtenberger. The Lake City Match brass is pretty good. Some lots have been excellent. The standard Lake City fodder is inferior to Winchester. IMI brass has a reputation for being strong, but we advise you only to purchase it new. Some used lots of IMI brass from Israel have been defective. If you are looking for ultimate accuracy, IMI will probably disappoint you, though it's good for gas guns that are tough on cases.
The most important thing to remember about military brass is that the internal capacity will probably be less than commercial .308 Win brass, because military brass often has thicker webs or casewalls. Montana Marine reports his fire-formed milsurp cases hold 56 grains of H20 on average compared to 58 grains for fire-formed Winchester. Given the reduced capacity of military brass, you should reduce posted max loads by 1.5 grains when loading with Lake City or most other milsurp brass. However, the IMI MATCH brass is closer to commercial brass in internal case capacity (ICC). Kevin Beggs reports: "Fired, my IMI Match brass runs with an ICC of 55.0gr and bumping the shoulder back .001" will net me an ICC average of 54.0gr. LAPUA runs an average of 54.4gr and Federal runs an average of 54.3gr ICC.""

 

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The least work would be Lapua and Peterson as they are very consistent, even lot to lot. Jamison (possibly JBA or Captech) ditto but it's rather difficult finding. GMM is nothing more than regular Federal .308 brass. It's the extra care in loading that made it's reputation. AND it is indeed soft. LC Match needs to be bought in huge quantities and sorted to give gilt edge performance much like just about ANY 7.62/.308 including Hornady "Match". BTW, if you go the huge quantity route make sure they ALL get trimmed to consistent length before segregating. 2.000" isn't too short and a thou or two difference is no big deal but .030" is.
Start haunting GunBroker, you might be surprised at what you'll find.
And of course, Jack, I'd be remiss if I didn't offer to buy all the .24 cent Virgin Winchester you'd care to sell.
 

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Still running quite a bit of 1x LC and interestingly, Venezuelan Army surplus circa 1991. The Venezuelans made some good stuff back in the day. Of course, I weight sort ALL of my brass, uniform the primer pockets, and debur the flash holes. But that's just me.
 

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Of course, I weight sort ALL of my brass, uniform the primer pockets, and debur the flash holes. But that's just me
I did anneal them (Giraud/Annie induction), turn the necks and sort.

This ^^^.
Brass sorting by weight should be done by weighing the internal capacity of the case, using water, not the actual weight of the case. Separate them by .5 grains.
You can include neck turning, and definitely include annealing. I suppose if you really want, you can sort by weight of bullet, I do not (anymore).
Also how accurate is your scale? How accurate is your actual weight of each throw?
Something is off in your reloading process, you just have to figure what it is. You may find out it’s the brass, but nobody will really know until you refine your reloading. You certainly don’t have to do any of this. But you don’t like the fliers, so now it’s time to dig a lil deeper into your reloading process.
Lol, you are opening up a can of worms with this.

@Jack Swilling makes very good points on commercial and military brass.
 

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About 15 years or do ago I lucked into 6000 Virgin LC match brass from the CMP. I have had exceptional luck and used those cases for a couple trips to Camp Perry to compete. I have also had good luck with Winchester brass. I also sort them by weight, true the primer pocket, deburred flash hole, and use bushing die.
 
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