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Discussion Starter #1
http://cgi.ebay.com/BEST-Side-Jet-B...14&_trkparms=72:1205|66:2|65:12|39:1|240:1318

i just wanted to let everyone else know about an extremely low cost, lightweight stove for backpacking. this thing is a old soda/beer can turned into a stove, and it works awesome.

It boils 2 cups of water in about 2 minutes or less, and 1 ounce of denatured alcohol will burn for about 10 minutes. it probably weighs 1/4lb with a windshield and a 20oz bottle of denatured alcohol. it can burn any liquid that is flammable, i personally have used everclear, as it is also good to add to coffee at night to make you feel better. one thing you do not want to use is something explosive like gasoline.

i have used mine bought from this guy on ebay for about 2 years now and it still works good as new. you can optionally make your own easily from plans on the net, but i found the aggrivation of making it isnt work the 10 bucks you could spend to get one. also this one has nice rivets to keep it together, and comes with a container.

i used an old piece of 4" duct and cut a 3" long section of it, but you could use anything really as a windscreen.

another benefit of the alcohol stove in cold areas is alcohol doesnt freeze as easily as some other fuel types for stoves. although in order to light it, you will need to use either a grill lighter, a match or firesteel, as you have to light the center of it and you will burn yourself if you use a disposable lighter or a zippo.
 

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I Love Guns
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317 Posts
2 cups in 2 min hmmm....
is there a video of this because i have bin using alcohol stoves for a long time and never seen one boil 2 cups of water in 2 min ...i use a mini blue and it's the fastest one i have used to date 6 min boil time ...now a canister stove can boil water in 2 min ...that stove there...i have a few of them and they boil water in about 7 to 9 min ...still good for a alcohol stove but 2 min seem alittle odd to me i would love to see it in action
 

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Here's Johnny!
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306 Posts
I've used alcohol 'can stoves'. And have found that for me, they were more of a hassle. I now use the Titanium Snowpeak GigaPower Stove w/ piezo ignite. The stove packs down tiny and I use the smallest fuel canister. Never had a prob.


If you're going to use alcohol stoves, the best 'fuel' to use IMO is ...


Just my 1/50th of a $1 ...
:D:
 

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free man
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626 Posts
A small stove is the way to go. I can boil water at 6am while still in my bag in driving snow when its 2 degrees in stuff like pic near the house in WNC.

This is how it will look inside at such times ;) Note titanium cookware. Spoon, coffee cup, and skillet. This Power Giga weighs 3oz w/o the 6oz tank(which can last a week easaily)


Of course thats from this solo trip in teh Slick Rock wilderness.


Or..kick back with a hot cup of coffee on the side of the trail w a hot lunch, in seconds. No impact to a given wilderness area either.

I cook inside this tent alot. Singlewall Intregal Designs. awesome tent.

An open fire is big pain in the arse regarding starting..maintaining..etc. Plus everyone know where you are(smell/sight). Plus, what if your above treeline?



Much easier to lay and cook. ;) Floorless rocks, btw.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
2 cups in 2 min hmmm....
is there a video of this because i have bin using alcohol stoves for a long time and never seen one boil 2 cups of water in 2 min ...i use a mini blue and it's the fastest one i have used to date 6 min boil time ...now a canister stove can boil water in 2 min ...that stove there...i have a few of them and they boil water in about 7 to 9 min ...still good for a alcohol stove but 2 min seem alittle odd to me i would love to see it in action
if i can find a video camera i will try to take a video and post it on youtube or something, i used to have a good one but i lost the bloody battery charger. 2 cups really is very little, and to tell you the truth i have not ever timed it, although that sounds close. it was quoted off of a website that i had the original plans on it. i have to dig it up.


i think on the ebay page the guy says something like 4-5 cups in 7 mins but im not so sure.
 

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I like the alcohol stoves. I've built more than several and, while they are a novelty, I carry one most of the time with a coleman fuel bottle. BUT!: 2 cups boiling in 2 minutes? I really would have to see that. Make it five to seven for a cup and a half and I'm a happier customer.


 

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trois pour cent
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5,942 Posts
I've used alcohol 'can stoves'. And have found that for me, they were more of a hassle. I now use the Titanium Snowpeak GigaPower Stove w/ piezo ignite. The stove packs down tiny and I use the smallest fuel canister. Never had a prob.


Just my 1/50th of a $1 ...
:D:
I have that exact stove and I love it. I carry it along with the snowpeak titanium cookware. Good performer. I recommend it. I even used it after Hurricane Gustav when I was 12 days without power.
That said, if I'm able to, I don't carry a stove at all. I practice "leave no trace" wherever I pack but depending on where you are and the time of year, it can be done without a stove.
 

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trois pour cent
Joined
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5,942 Posts
A small stove is the way to go. I can boil water at 6am while still in my bag in driving snow when its 2 degrees in stuff like pic near the house in WNC.

This is how it will look inside at such times ;) Note titanium cookware. Spoon, coffee cup, and skillet. This Power Giga weighs 3oz w/o the 6oz tank(which can last a week easaily)


Of course thats from this solo trip in teh Slick Rock wilderness.


Or..kick back with a hot cup of coffee on the side of the trail w a hot lunch, in seconds. No impact to a given wilderness area either.

I cook inside this tent alot. Singlewall Intregal Designs. awesome tent.

An open fire is big pain in the arse regarding starting..maintaining..etc. Plus everyone know where you are(smell/sight). Plus, what if your above treeline?



Much easier to lay and cook. ;) Floorless rocks, btw.
Great pics! Thanks for sharing those.
 

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free man
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626 Posts
Duckman, what kind of shelters are you using?
The top pic is a Walrus(bought out by MSR) Rapeede(2 wall, 4 season, 6lb) and Mtn Hardware Trango Assault(2 wall, 4 season, 8.5lb). On Siler Bald at 5100' along the AT.

3rd pic is a Black diamond Betamid. 2 pole (uses your already existing trekking poles) tepee design , floorless, coated singlewall, 4 season, 2.6lb. Lots of room(45 sq ft) for the weight. Great for dogs, cooking, etc. as well. Low profile=strong in wind. I usually use a Mtn hardware stormlite bivy bag cover with it(waterproof breathable, 15oz). Location is in the Indian Peaks Wilderness(Co Rockies) just below Pawnee Pass at 11,600'.

4th is a Intregal Designs MK1XL. 2 pole wedge, waterproof breathable singlewall design, mtneering class, 4.5lb. Very small footprint(28 sq ft). Goes up/down from the inside. Zip-on vestibule(adds 1lb) My fav tent in the universe. That OD color is a big bonus. Also in the Rockies.

The other green tent seen is a buds Bibler Eldorado. Another highend WPB singlewall(these 2 tents are $650+ ea)

Bottom is the Golite Hex. I think this size(2 person) has been disc now in fav of a 3 per. Also an awesome floorless shelter like the Betamid above. (About 4lbs w pole).

And thanks regarding the pics.
 

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free man
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626 Posts
Never seen a Bibler firsthand. Hard to believe it's worth all that money. Is it?
No condensation?
Well, like everything else, its all relative. Some mtneers would laugh at the idea of paying $1-2-3k for a gun :). Having said that, I didn't pay that much tho. Mine was a display model at McHale packs(argubly the best custom pack mfg avail) . Got it from Dan McHale for $360 about 10yrs ago. my bud snag'd the Bibler for $250 on Ebay WITH the optional vestibule. He later sold it for $400.

Altho, the innovation, quality, and technical aspects of such tents is amazing to see regarding the use of 3 layer Goretex(yes its Goretex. Bibler has the U.S. part of the rights to its use, and IDesigns has it in Canada). I've taken it up/down in countless snow storms that were sometimes in 50+ mph winds, and it was worth every cent at those times(under seige for hours/days). When it goes up-->just stake it out...throw the pack inside..you go in afterward with the poles..then put it up from the inside, basically out of the weather. Same with the Betamid..which I use the most since its half the weight. Still strong in big wind. Goes up/down even faster. More floorspace. Keeps wear off the ID as well. I got the Betamid for $90 new and unused, with the optional floor which I sold. Tons of frost tho with a coated design like the Betamid or Hex. ..but so what? Just shake it off before stuffing it the next morning.

Yes you get some condensation if buttoned up(since its singlewall/waterproof 100% of its surface area, you can stop all air movement). Especially if theres 2 people in it(which I don't do, unless its the wife). If one keeps the top of the door open slightly and 1 side vent(away from the wind)..its very minimal if at all. The exception is when its about 10* inside or less. The condensation freezes to the inner wicking surface area before it has time to pass thru/and or dry. Then you'll have a thin frost layer, usually above your head the most. When the top of the bag hits the tent, you get rained on with frost somewhat. No biggie tho. Sleeping bags do the same thing each night, regarding accumilating moisture(mostly in the insulation fill or innder shell surface). We just don't notice since its minimal and only out for a few nights usually. A month out, and that can be a problem, especially with down(hence the use for a vapor barrier). Thats why its important to let bags dry out for a day or two after a trip before storing in a breathable storage bag.

Sorry for getting off subject.
 
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