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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
new to this site, it looks pretty cool! now to test it with my first question. Does anybody have any tips on a style of tent that would work well in the winter? i dont need brands, just a style that should keep 1 to 2 people warm through the night. also any tips on winter camping in general?
thanks
 

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Short term or long? A tepee style allows for a fire inside the tent. A canvass heavy tent can use a stove with adapter for the pipe going through the roof or wall. A dome would probably be best for a back packable solution.
 

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Sweat more, bleed less!
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tepee would be my pick for the best mobility vs comfort. that along with a good sleeping mat and wool blanket and your set for all but the coldest weather.

I'm a traditionalist when it comes to camping and survival so it works for me, but some prefer to spend 1k on a sleeping bag and big outfitters tent...
 

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One suggestion I would make is to make sure you have extra room. Winter stuff is bulkier and takes up a lot more room!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i have a two man triangle style summer tent, what are my winter chances? haha have a great mummy bag (good for -30) and plenty of wool, good enough?
 

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I have been using a Eureka 4-season tent, bought from Campmor I think, for winter camping for about 20 years. It's listed as 2-3 person tent, but really is only a two person for winter camping due to the need to store stuff inside. If you go with a 4 season tent, note that it will be relatively heavy (by backpacking standards--5-7 pounds maybe) and absolutely needs a rain fly & ventilation. Ground cloth is a necessity, and should always be used. No flames inside a tent, however tempting it may be when it's -5 outside. I suppose one of those enclosed candle lanterns would be safe, though.

Tom.
 

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Sweat more, bleed less!
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around here i havent seen much need for anything but a tarp, wool blanket, paracoard, army tents poles, and a coupple bungies. that setup is capable of keeeping you warm and dry in some pritty bad weather aswell and only costs about $50 TOTAL. the whole set up is under 5 lbs too.
 

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Short term or long? A tepee style allows for a fire inside the tent. A canvass heavy tent can use a stove with adapter for the pipe going through the roof or wall. A dome would probably be best for a back packable solution.
Kifaru Designs makes a cool teepee that has a wood stove made to go inside. It is expensive but it looks pretty cool, and high quality.

http://www.kifaru.net/TIPI.HTM
 

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In the winter here in the great lake's for 2-3 guy's we use a 4-person tent. A good trick is to carry a fleece blanket "fleece is light" to cover the screen's on the top.Put this under the rain fly,it hold's in heat and block's the wind.If using a heater or stove you can uncover a section of the screen for a chimney.
 

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24 lbs? that's a heavy fin tent.
Ya its abit heavy but at -30+ it the only way to go!

So i guess the question of best tent for winter camping is Relative!

There is lots of good 4 season tents out there that will work well for lower 48 winter camping. One thing to look at when you go looking is single wall vs. double wall. Single wall will be lighter but double wall will be more weather resistant and insulating.

Good luck on finding what will work best for your environment!
 

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Canvas

I like the canvas military style tents, original if you can get one. I was once in Germany, 30 below zero, with 4 feet of snow on the ground. The tent, with the liner, and a small pot belly stove made it out right comfortable in there. We stayed in the field in that tent for 15 days, it was fine.
 

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HANDY MAN
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I like the canvas military style tents, original if you can get one. I was once in Germany, 30 below zero, with 4 feet of snow on the ground. The tent, with the liner, and a small pot belly stove made it out right comfortable in there. We stayed in the field in that tent for 15 days, it was fine.
Agreed.

I spent a lot of long field problems in the Ft.Drum winters in those tents and always appreciated them!
 

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You need a good 4 season that has good ventilation. Ventilation is the key with this type of camping! Too much condensation and moisture is a bad thing at 3 in the morning and all you want is to be warm, dry and sleep. My personal favorite is MSR but make sure, what ever you get, you get a nice footprint for it.

General tips for winter camping:

-Don't make camp on snow unless you have to.
-Do make sure you have proper tent stakes in case you set your tent up on frozen ground or snow. Snow shoes and skies make great tent stakes in deep snow.
-Do set up tarp over/near your tent for added protection
-Do make sure you use a footprint or ground cover with your tent for added insulation.
-Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation. Do not allow moisture to collect anywhere. That includes sweat on your body and condensation in your tent.

Here is a site from REI with a check list that is good food-for-thought.
http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/articles/snow+camping+checklist.html

 

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Looks good,I use a light weight, black,pondliner in a triangle setup,vent controlled at opening,the highest point,the kind I buy are cheap and flat black,absorb sunlight and blend in well,can be draped over deadfalls,etc.
 

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What do you consider to be winter camping or more importantly where and how high up?

There is a big difference between winter in Northern Texas and New Mexico then the high arctic of the Northwest Territories...temperatures range from+10F to -50F...one you can do OK with a couple of blankets and the other you need a specialty bag like a Woods 5 Star that weighs 40 lbs but you can sleep naked at -30F and be too warm--I've done it...

Not only how high up the globe but how high up the mountain are you as you lose X degrees for every 1,000 feet you go up…

As to a tent being heavier for Winter or expedition camping it's necessary, as they are normally wider and longer because you have more stuff, heavier material so you can take and survive a snow load, heavier weight material to help block the wind and as long as you keep your side windows and/or your front and back door partially open you can burn anything you want in them from propane tanks--which don't work good at -30F, Naphtha/white gas or wood burning heat source…

The biggest tip I can give is insulation from and by the snow…Underneath; you need lots and lots of padding to keep you off the heat robbing cold ground. I’ve used army cots in winter tents to do the job, but you can use the snow to build a snow wall around your tent which reduces wind and you can use some snow on the sidewalls of the tent to act as insulation from the cold…Ever sleep in an ice cave, quite warm, ask any Inuit who can build an igloo.

If you are going to build a cave first thing you have to do is shovel all the snow out of the area you want to sleep in and then pile it back up on top of the area…this allows the snow to have air pockets, like long underwear, and will help to keep the snow together so it won’t collapse…line the bottom with spruce/fir/pine boughs for insulation and you’ll be OK at –40F—we did it one night and it was fine…

There is an old wives saying that goes ”If your feet are cold, put on your hat!” You are loosing heat through your extremities, feet, hands and the heads the largest so moves more heat to the cold air…When going to bed, If you can, get out of your outer clothes, even down to your longjohns because your clothes are wet with perspiration and when warmed up under the covers will rain on you!! Most important is change your socks, somewhat for the same reason, but you have to allow your skin to breath, massage them and you’ll do fine…If you get cold during the night put on a watch cap (toque) again to reduce heat loss…Have you big meal of the evening just before your going to sleep as the extra carbs will help keep you warmer…

I want, with a passion, the Kifaru Tepee style tent with their little stove, I drool over their catalogue so much that they are starting to curl up and down…absolutely beautiful design, well made but expensive…Another great winter tent maker is
Hilleberg from Sweden located also in Redmond. WA. and
Robet Saunder from the UK has some neat designs…
For backpacking ultralite style there is
Six Moon Design and
Stephenson's Warmlite which I’ve used for nearly 30 years. and works well, still!
 

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For winter camping, i'd suggest getting a four-season tent they're made to withstand the elements of winter weather. Of course a couple of thermal sleeping bags would help add to your comfort. My brother sometimes camps in the winter and uses the Eureka K-2XT. He seems to like it.
 
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