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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which grain flaker/roller should I buy when durability is the most important feature? To be able to make one’s own breakfast cereals would be a great advantage when we have to dig in to our supply of grains.
 

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Buckeye Prepper
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Grain Flaker/Mill

I have the Family Mill manual grinder for wheat and oats. I use a Corona Corn Mill for popcorn for making corn meal. I am pleased with both and are moderately priced. I would suggest purchasing replacement parts for any mill you buy. Happy milling:thumb:
 

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I have the Family Mill manual grinder for wheat and oats.
Is that a flaker also? A flaker is what he's asking about. I'm curious too. I'm considering one to augment my grain storage and mill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My problem isn’t as much finding grain flakers as knowing which one to buy to avoid being disappointed 2 years into a SHTF-situation. So I was hoping someone had one which they knew through experience were a good choice, or which ones to stay away from.

I do trust http://www.countrylivinggrainmills.com/ since I already know that their grain mill is superb. The roller they got is “The Campo Roller and Flaker”. http://www.countrylivinggrainmills.com/index.php?action=store&section=misc&item=campoRoller

But the Eschenfelder Seed and Grain Flaker also seems to be a good one. http://www.wholisticresearch.com/shop/home/m/Shop/id/889/from/786/page/1/

And one I didn’t know about until I followed the link supplied by Goose3 above, is The Marga flaker by Marcato. Since I already have got their pasta maker, including the motorizing kit, that one could be the one for me.


One could get an awful lot of paracord for the price of one grain roller. So I was hoping to avoid buying two just to be sure…..:)
 

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Future Codgers of America
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Complete noob here so bear with me. I have been contemplating this issue as well. A question I have is this: would a mill designed to crush malt for beer brewing be something to consider for flaking? If so this guy has designed one that looks pretty promising. I emailed him in the past when I was looking for a flour mill and he was quick and friendly with his response.

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I have the Family Mill manual grinder for wheat and oats.
Is that a flaker also? A flaker is what he's asking about. I'm curious too. I'm considering one to augment my grain storage and mill.
There is a separate Family Grain Mill Flaker. It works with the same attachments and/or manual handle as the Family Grain Mill. In addition to the manual crank, there is a motorized base for it or they also make attachments for several different mixers (KitchenAid, Bosch, Electrolux, Viking). I use mine regularly now (why wait?) and it works well. I can't comment on any of the others.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Complete noob here so bear with me. I have been contemplating this issue as well. A question I have is this: would a mill designed to crush malt for beer brewing be something to consider for flaking? If so this guy has designed one that looks pretty promising. I emailed him in the past when I was looking for a flour mill and he was quick and friendly with his response.

+N
After reading how that unit works, it appears to do exactly the same thing as a typical grain roller. The adjustable model is $145 which is a good price for a unit that processes grain that fast. And their lifetime warantee that isn't effected by motorizing the mill sounds like they have a lot of faith in the product too. I think I'm going to give it a try when I invest in my roller. I make beer, so it'll be handy for that too.
 

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This one has the TROLL Clan seal of approval

We have one of these...
http://www.kitchenkneads.com/index.php?module=store_listings&action=view_listing&listing=63

BUILT LIKE A TANK...IT FLAT WORKS!!!!!... SHOP AROUND, as the price varies...

There is a Chinese knock off that looks identical for half the price, but Caviet Emptor, as Chinese quality is not always up to snuff. Check out Ebay for the knockoff...

If I did not have a flaker, I would defiantly buy this one! What more can I say!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We have one of these...
http://www.kitchenkneads.com/index.php?module=store_listings&action=view_listing&listing=63

BUILT LIKE A TANK...IT FLAT WORKS!!!!!... SHOP AROUND, as the price varies...

There is a Chinese knock off that looks identical for half the price, but Caviet Emptor, as Chinese quality is not always up to snuff. Check out Ebay for the knockoff...

If I did not have a flaker, I would defiantly buy this one! What more can I say!!!
Can the motorizing kit for their pasta maker be attached to this grain flaker? If so, that may be one more reason for me to follow your advice.
 

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Fresh

HUMMM...Motor off the pasta machine??? That's a good one...But then why??? Unless you are feeding an army, it takes so little time to run a batch for breakfast, that the motor would be a waste of time. Keeping your oats or other grains whole, and I mean un-processed untill you use them, will keep them fresher longer. It is not like running the Country Living Mill for a batch of bread, where you are going to be at it for a while...I can do up a batch of Oats for 4 people way before the water even thinks about boiling, and I have a commercial grade gas range. It takes me longer to grind coffee for the morning fix!

A quick note: On the harder grains like wheat, the flakes it produces are not a "flat" as store bought. They are very acceptable. The machine realy comes into it's own with softer grains. The distructions say it will produce flour, but I would shoot myself rather than spend the time it takes...Yea, OK, it will, but have a bullet handy!

This really is a cool little machine!
 

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I have a manual Family Grain Mill and flaker. I was in a hurry and just coarse ground some wheat, barley and corn, then poured it into hot water and cooked about 2 min with a smidge of salt and honey. Now I rarely use with the flaker, we like it this way. I've also ground this mix flour fine, added honey, water, salt, cinnamon, and spread it about 1/2" thick on a microwave safe plate. "Bake" at med power about 60-90 seconds and instant breakfast bread kinda thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Since it’s been two years since I began this thread, it’s high time for an update.

After consulting my significant other, the esthetic properties of the Eschenfelder Seed and Grain Flaker couldn’t be ignored. ;) And we certainly haven’t regretted that choice. As an average I guess we run about two pounds of grain through the flaker each week. And it still works perfect and has no signs of wear at all. It hasn’t ball bearings, so I was wondering of the wear where the metal slips against the wood work. But we have been careful to apply grease on a regular basis and it holds up admiringly.



So the conclusion is that I have no second thoughts about recommending the Eschenfelder Flaker. Or the German retailer where I bought it. But there are American or Canadian retailers too, such as “The Puppenstube” http://thepuppenstube.com/node/2539 and Bio Supply Ltd http://www.biosupply.com/products/flakers.html A British one is Wholistic Research. http://www.wholisticresearch.com/shop/home/m/Shop/id/889/from/786/
 
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