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Say you don't have much room inside your house where you can control the temperature, but you have a storage building outside (no AC or heat) with some room. What kinds of foods (if any) would be ok to keep there?

Assume the climate where you live is often hot and humid (like, say, Florida :D:).
 

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Say you don't have much room inside your house where you can control the temperature, but you have a storage building outside (no AC or heat) with some room. What kinds of foods (if any) would be ok to keep there?

Assume the climate where you live is often hot and humid (like, say, Florida :D:).
God i dont Miss Tampa one bit, So glad i decided to GTFO of there 15 years ago. I grew up in South Tampa, down by the A.F.B. Anyway sorry about the offtopic, i think you will be hard pressed to find anything that will keep longterm, but short term shuld be okay in the milder months, like ohh now.
 

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What you need to do is find out the average temperature for your local area by doing a web such. You may need to average the monthly high and low then add them up and divided by 12 months. So, if your average yearly temperature is 80oF shelf life decreases by half, Hard White Wheat would still store 12 to 15 years or Pinto Beans 10 to 15 years. Most mixes and items with fat content will go rancid first so you will likely want to keep to the basics. Defiantly NOT wet packed can goods from the grocery store, not in your heat.
All of the following products will store proportionally longer at cooler temperatures if kept at lower storage temperatures. Shelf life of 30+ years is perfectly feasible for many products. Temperature and temperature changes have the most to do with the shelf life of stored food then any other factor. The USDA states, "Each 5.6 C. (10.08F) drop in temperature doubles the storage life of the seeds." Experience has shown that this applies to foods too.
Below is a chart to help you determine the shelf life of food stored in air tight, oxygen absorbed, metal containers at constant temperature of 70 degrees. **!
Years Years Years
Apples 30
Adzuki Beans 8 - 10 Gluten 5 Powder Eggs 15
Alfalfa Seeds 8 Granola 5 Powder Milk 20
All Purpose Flour 15 Great Northern 15 Quinoa 8
Bakers Flour 15 Groats 8 Refried Beans 5
Barley 10 Hard Red Wheat 25 - 30 Ribbons 8 - 15
Black Turtle Beans 15 - 20 Hard White Wheat 25 - 30 Rolled Oats 30
Blackeye Beans 15 -20 Honey, Salt and Sugar Indefinitely Rye 8
Broccoli 8 - 10 Hulled Oats 30 Small Red Beans 8 - 10
Brown Rice 6 Kamut 8 - 12 Soft wheat 25
Buckwheat 15 Kidney Beans 20 Soy Beans 8 - 10
Butter/margarine Powder 15 Lentils 20 Spaghetti 15 -20
Cabbage 8 - 10 Lima Beans 20 Special bakery wheat 25
Carrots 8 - 10 Macaroni 15 - 20 Spelt 12
Celery 8 - 10 Millet 8 - 12 Sprouting Seeds 4-5
Cheese Powder 15 Mixes 5 - 10 Triticale 8 - 12
Cocoa Powder 15 Morning Moo 10 TVP 15 - 20
Corn 8 - 12 Mung Beans 8 - 10 Unbleached Flour 5
Cornmeal 5 Noodles 8 - 10 Wheat flakes 15
Cracked wheat 25 Onions 8 - 12 Whey Powder 15
Durham Wheat 8 - 12 Peanut Butter Powder 4 - 5 White Flour 5
Flax 8 - 12 Pearled Oats 10 White Rice 8 - 10
Fruit 5 Peppers 8 - 12 Whole Wheat Flour 5
Garbanzo Beans 15 - 20 Pink Beans 20 - 30 Yeast 2
Garden Seeds 4 Pinto Beans 20 - 30
Germade 5 Potatoes (flakes, slices, dices) 20 - 30
Predicting actual shelf life of dehydrated foods is not an exact science, however there have been many studies done. In addition to the above average shelf life of food stored at a constant 70 degrees, you can dramatically increase your life expectancy by lowering the constant temperature. It is possible to double, triple or even quadriple the shelf life by lowering the temperature proportionally. Some products, such as seeds, can even be frozen for dramatically increased shelf life. The basic rule of thumb is to store you food storage in as low of temperature as possible to increase its shelf life and to retain nutritional value.A new study by the Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Science at Brigham Young University (*.pdf file) tested several varieties of dehydrated stored foods in #10 cans. They have learned that shelf life is considerably longer then previously thougt


http://survivalacres.com/information/shelflife.html.
 
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