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Christian Survivalist
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Is Benzene and Hydrogen Sulfide worse than the oil washing up on the shores of the gulf coast? From the research I have done, Benzene is actually being tested at variable high cencentrations IN the gulf states, not just off shore!


There have been levels of benzene as high as 2.507 parts per million on Grand Isle. Other levels as high as 3.388 parts per million in Chalmette. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set a permissible benzene exposure limit of 1 part per million parts (1 ppm)

A diagram of a benzene molecule, C6H6

According to the World Health Organization (quoted in this link) Benzene's toxicity is not in dispute. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "Benzene is carcinogenic to humans and no safe level of exposure can be recommended." It is directly linked to leukemia and crosses the placenta to the fetus at levels greater than or equal to the amount in the mother's blood. The chemical is frequently detected in the food supply as a result of industrial pollution, making additional and avoidable exposures of even greater concern.

Benzene is a highly carcinogenic gas that can cause death if inhaled at high enough concentrations. Not only that, benzene has been shown to cause leukemia in all its forms. High levels of both gases have been detected at testing stations in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, it is being reported that many fishermen in the Gulf that have been assisting with cleanup efforts have been getting seriously ill from breathing that air. There have been reports of symptoms including headaches, nausea, dizziness, burning eyes, coughing, sore throats, and stuffy sinuses. So as this oil spill continues and even more of these gases are released, are people across the southeast United States about to start breathing air that is filled with highly toxic gases? Are we about to see the American Dream turned into a total nightmare for tens of millions of Americans? What some scientists are now telling us about the release of these gases is truly frightening.

WWLTV Video Story Link: http://www.wwltv.com/home/Oil-Spill...Quality-Along-Coastal-Louisiana-94202149.html

Hydrogen sulfide is a chemical asphyxiant, similar to carbon monoxide and cyanide gases. It causes "biochemical suffocation" by inhibiting cellular respiration and the uptake of oxygen.

Do you think I'm a conspiracy theorist, see the EPA Testing Source yourself: http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/air.html

Story Source: http://endoftheamericandream.com/ar...eal-dangers-from-the-gulf-of-mexico-oil-spill
 

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Christian Survivalist
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Discussion Starter #2
For those that are in the gulf area, perhaps involved with the clean up or if you just live there and are considering a filter mask, you'd want to search for something that specifically filters out Volatile Organic Compounds. I have done some preliminary research and I have found some that say they do. As mentioned above, the most Volatile Organic Compound is Benzene, so make sure the one you are looking for filters this chemical out specifically. I have not tested these, and I do not carry them, however, I am providing what research I have done to anyone who wants it. Further, from all the research I have done, there is nothing that states how long these filter masks will keep filtering out these compounds.

3M seems to have the corner of the market on these types of masks. They have masks with replaceable filters and masks that do not have replaceable filters. To me, if I lived down there in the gulf, knowing that this spill is going to be around a while, I'd probably get one with a replaceable filter and have extra ones on hand. What you are looking for, specifically in a 3m filter is a "Organic Vapor Cartridge". There are many types of Organic Vapor, benzene is one of them. Benzene is also just about the nastiest gas out there and can cause cancer. Particularly you need at least the 3M 6001 filter, or get additional protection with the 3M 6003 or 3M 60923. Then you could combine that with any 6000 series mask made by 3M like the 3M 6700, 3M 6800, 3M 6900 Full Facepiece Respirator Gas Mask. You buy them separately. The mask takes two filters, the filters are usually sold in pairs. There are usually two sizes of the masks, meduim and large. The reason for this is the better the fit the better the protection.

I hope all the research helps someone.
 

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Complete Newbie
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This is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you for the info. While listening to Lindsey Williams talk about the gases (while tired...bad idea) I quickly found a mask that filtered Benzene and bought it and replacement filters. It's a Respro Techno that says it filters benzene though it didn't mention the other gases coming from the well so I just don't know if it's going to be sufficient.

Have you, or has anyone else looked into the Respro Techno masks? Obviously the 3M would be better, but would this be sufficient temporarily? For instance, to carry with me in my truck and use until I can get to the 3M etc...

Thanks for the input. I live in Central FL and this is something I'm taking seriously.
 

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Christian Survivalist
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2,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
This is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you for the info. While listening to Lindsey Williams talk about the gases (while tired...bad idea) I quickly found a mask that filtered Benzene and bought it and replacement filters. It's a Respro Techno that says it filters benzene though it didn't mention the other gases coming from the well so I just don't know if it's going to be sufficient.

Have you, or has anyone else looked into the Respro Techno masks? Obviously the 3M would be better, but would this be sufficient temporarily? For instance, to carry with me in my truck and use until I can get to the 3M etc...

Thanks for the input. I live in Central FL and this is something I'm taking seriously.
I'll check it out. I have not heard of it, but I'd be happy to find out what I can. Anybody posting information about gas masks and their experience should post it here. Lets hope that people can use the information for help. Thanks for the post.
 

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Christian Survivalist
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Discussion Starter #5
I did research that mask - The Respro Techno Mask - Im not positive, but it appears to be made in the UK. Can someone find out for sure? Also those that sell it here in the US sell it for around $60. They do make replacement filters and they do claim to filter out Benzene. If you are located in the USA, you can buy them at this locatioin .....

Link: http://www.achooallergy.com/mask-resprotechnomask.asp

Just so you know, Im not personally recommending this filter, but I dont want to hinder anybody's personal research, so go for it. I recommend a lot of study!

I've decided to carry the 3M mask myself in Half Mask or Full Mask. The reason for my choice was several factors, including availablity, and the industrial experience with 3M. I've been in contruction and I am very aware of the quality of 3M and have used them before when painters were using laquer in our enclosed space that we electricians were working in. So, just from my personal experience, Im going with 3M. It appears that you can get a mask and set of filters for under $30. Again, the filter that I would recommend for exposure to this type of gas is the 3M 6001

If anybody is interested, the links I have for the 3M are below ...

Half Mask - http://www.readypro.biz/3m-6100-respirator-face36100.html
Full Mask - http://www.readypro.biz/3m-6800-and-6900-full-face-r368006900.html
Replacement filters for both - http://www.readypro.biz/3m-6001-6003-and-6004-filt3600160036004.html

Again, I dont wish to be a profiteer, use the information any way you wish and buy from whoever you trust. For those that need them, I am issueing a 20% off coupon code 'BPFU' that will be available shortly. :upsidedown:

Update: Coupon built - Its good until September 20th 2010
 

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Christian Survivalist
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Discussion Starter #6
Here is some disturbing data -

Station: GI06 (Grand Isle)
Date: 6/19/2010
Volitile Organic Compounds Daily Average: 4.563 ppm
Source: http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/reports/mht/gi_vo.mht

Remember the limit is 1ppm by the EPA and WHO says that there is no safe limit. Also, this is a daily average. It could well spike beyond this 4ppm.
 

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Amos 8:11-12
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There are serious concerns of another threat far worse than the gas leakage. Fears are starting of the seabed fracturing and releasing a huge lake of methane gas that is under 100,000 psi. They say this will cause a tsunami that will totally wipe Florida and the rest of the Gulf coast off the map.

If that's true then every oil rig in the gulf will be ripped from their pipes.

What a lot of people don’t realize is that once the water contains a certain amount of methane it no longer allows vessels to remain afloat. I’ve seen a video a long time ago of an oil rig that had methane bubble up directly beneath it and it sank like a rock within minutes. You can’t even swim in methane saturated water.

Check this article out.
http://republicbroadcasting.org/?p=9175
 

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Later Dude Saint
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725 Posts
exactly. if the water hits the magma thats pushing the oil and huge amounts
of methane then it could explode..
its not a spill or a leak- its a volcano- set to go.
 

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Christian Survivalist
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Discussion Starter #10
Well I guess it could erupt into something like that, but certainly thats not as assured as whats already happening. But lets hope that kind of event does not happen.
 

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Brain Surgery v7.62
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Here's some bad news. Found this on the EPA's website -

The simplified and balanced equation for the biological metabolic process which converts
hydrogen sulfide to sulfuric acid is presented below:

H2S + 2 O2 = H2SO4
(Hydrogen sulfide - gas) + (atmospheric Oxygen) = (Sulfuric Acid)


This means that the hydrogen sulfide can be converted to sulfuric acid as it is introduced to the atmosphere. Then......... It gets sent back to earth as rain, REAL acid rain.

We could be looking at crop and general vegetation death of Biblical proportions (as in Revelation)
 

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Tangentially related, but just thought I'd point it out:
Next time you drink a soda, check the ingredients for sodium or potassium benzoate. By themselves, pretty standard preservative (with research suggesting it can damage DNA and interrupt cellular processes), but give that preservative an acidic environment (say, with vitamin C or citric acid) and benzene can result.
The FDA re-opened an investigation of the matter.
 

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exactly. if the water hits the magma thats pushing the oil and huge amounts
of methane then it could explode..
its not a spill or a leak- its a volcano- set to go.
Water on top of magma just boils away. If water were to get underneath the magma in significant quantities it would explode. There's active volcanoes releasing magma on the ocean floor all the time and they don't cause explosions. Plus it would have to be a considerable amount of water to cause problems that deep in the ocean. I'm not saying it couldn't happen, but it's not likely.

I deal with this danger everyday as we have water cooled panels containing liquid steel in our electric arc furnaces. We have leaks occasionally because the electricity will arc to the panels. It causes steam to exit the top of the furnaces. Every operator knows not to tilt the furnace in this case because it could cause the steel to get on top of the water and cause an explosion. It's happened here and at another facility I worked in the past and it can be a significant explosion to the point of splitting the furnace in half and throwing scrap steel long distances. It even happens when it's raining because of water being in the scrap as it's dumped in the furnaces, but that causes explosions that aren't so violent. It just shakes the building and scares the crap out of everyone.

http://www.forensic.cc/newsletter/electric-arc-steelmaking-furnace-accidents said:
The two main causes of explosions are 'explosive' items in the scrap and the 'mixing' of water and steel. Considering that the raw material is scrap, there is a potential for explosives, pressure vessels and pockets of water to be accidentally introduced into the furnace. The roofs and sides of electrical furnaces are water-cooled and the accidental introduction of water onto the surface of the pool of molten slag/steel happens from time to time, usually without damage. It is when water somehow becomes trapped beneath molten steel or slag that damage and injury can occur.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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Water on top of magma just boils away. If water were to get underneath the magma in significant quantities it would explode. There's active volcanoes releasing magma on the ocean floor all the time and they don't cause explosions. Plus it would have to be a considerable amount of water to cause problems that deep in the ocean. I'm not saying it couldn't happen, but it's not likely.

I deal with this danger everyday as we have water cooled panels containing liquid steel in our electric arc furnaces. We have leaks occasionally because the electricity will arc to the panels. It causes steam to exit the top of the furnaces. Every operator knows not to tilt the furnace in this case because it could cause the steel to get on top of the water and cause an explosion. It's happened here and at another facility I worked in the past and it can be a significant explosion to the point of splitting the furnace in half and throwing scrap steel long distances. It even happens when it's raining because of water being in the scrap as it's dumped in the furnaces, but that causes explosions that aren't so violent. It just shakes the building and scares the crap out of everyone.

then you should know what happens when a vessel cannot take the pressure of rapidly expanding steam. Sea water introduced into a cavity as oil pressure drops would find the water in between the remaining oil, and whatever is underneath. introduce enough heat from below and the oil starts to come out under higher and higher pressure as the steam tries to expand. If the above rock strata fails...

Ever see a water heater explode?

 
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Just had a thought,is this why they are using prisoners to clean up. Just saying. The old kill two birds with one stone.
 

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Christian Survivalist
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Discussion Starter #18
The Benzene issue is really going to hit the fan this week. CNN is reporting a HUGE slick, 30 miles long, thats headed for Grand Isle sometime this week. That meter will be spiking and people will be injured for sure.
 

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then you should know what happens when a vessel cannot take the pressure of rapidly expanding steam. Sea water introduced into a cavity as oil pressure drops would find the water in between the remaining oil, and whatever is underneath. introduce enough heat from below and the oil starts to come out under higher and higher pressure as the steam tries to expand. If the above rock strata fails...

Ever see a water heater explode?
Yes, I know about vessels exploding due to steam pressure.

Your scenario is different than the above one that I spoke of. This one includes a lot of "what ifs". I could throw a lot of what ifs out there also, but I'll just stick to posting the facts like I did above.

How do we even know magma is in these wells? Didn't one of the capping attempts fail because of ice crystals?
 

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Christian Survivalist
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Discussion Starter #20
More information about Benzene ...

Source: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/benzene/basics/facts.asp

CDC: Emergency Preparedness and Response; Facts About Benzene

What benzene is

•Benzene is a chemical that is a colorless or light yellow liquid at room temperature. It has a sweet odor and is highly flammable.

•Benzene evaporates into the air very quickly. Its vapor is heavier than air and may sink into low-lying areas.

•Benzene dissolves only slightly in water and will float on top of water.
Where benzene is found and how it is used

•Benzene is formed from both natural processes and human activities.

•Natural sources of benzene include volcanoes and forest fires. Benzene is also a natural part of crude oil, gasoline, and cigarette smoke.

•Benzene is widely used in the United States . It ranks in the top 20 chemicals for production volume.

•Some industries use benzene to make other chemicals that are used to make plastics, resins, and nylon and synthetic fibers. Benzene is also used to make some types of lubricants, rubbers, dyes, detergents, drugs, and pesticides.
How you could be exposed to benzene

•Outdoor air contains low levels of benzene from tobacco smoke, gas stations, motor vehicle exhaust, and industrial emissions.

•Indoor air generally contains levels of benzene higher than those in outdoor air. The benzene in indoor air comes from products that contain benzene such as glues, paints, furniture wax, and detergents.

•The air around hazardous waste sites or gas stations can contain higher levels of benzene than in other areas.

•Benzene leaks from underground storage tanks or from hazardous waste sites containing benzene can contaminate well water.

•People working in industries that make or use benzene may be exposed to the highest levels of it.

•A major source of benzene exposure is tobacco smoke.
How benzene works

•Benzene works by causing cells not to work correctly. For example, it can cause bone marrow not to produce enough red blood cells, which can lead to anemia. Also, it can damage the immune system by changing blood levels of antibodies and causing the loss of white blood cells.

•The seriousness of poisoning caused by benzene depends on the amount, route, and length of time of exposure, as well as the age and preexisting medical condition of the exposed person.
Immediate signs and symptoms of exposure to benzene

•People who breathe in high levels of benzene may develop the following signs and symptoms within minutes to several hours:
◦Drowsiness
◦Dizziness
◦Rapid or irregular heartbeat
◦Headaches
◦Tremors
◦Confusion
◦Unconsciousness
◦Death (at very high levels)

•Eating foods or drinking beverages containing high levels of benzene can cause the following symptoms within minutes to several hours:
◦Vomiting
◦Irritation of the stomach
◦Dizziness
◦Sleepiness
◦Convulsions
◦Rapid or irregular heartbeat
◦Death (at very high levels)

•If a person vomits because of swallowing foods or beverages containing benzene, the vomit could be sucked into the lungs and cause breathing problems and coughing.

•Direct exposure of the eyes, skin, or lungs to benzene can cause tissue injury and irritation.

•Showing these signs and symptoms does not necessarily mean that a person has been exposed to benzene.

Long-term health effects of exposure to benzene

•The major effect of benzene from long-term exposure is on the blood. (Long-term exposure means exposure of a year or more.) Benzene causes harmful effects on the bone marrow and can cause a decrease in red blood cells, leading to anemia. It can also cause excessive bleeding and can affect the immune system, increasing the chance for infection.

•Some women who breathed high levels of benzene for many months had irregular menstrual periods and a decrease in the size of their ovaries. It is not known whether benzene exposure affects the developing fetus in pregnant women or fertility in men.

•Animal studies have shown low birth weights, delayed bone formation, and bone marrow damage when pregnant animals breathed benzene.

•The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has determined that benzene causes cancer in humans. Long-term exposure to high levels of benzene in the air can cause leukemia, cancer of the blood-forming organs.
How you can protect yourself, and what to do if you are exposed to benzene

•First, if the benzene was released into the air, get fresh air by leaving the area where the benzene was released. Moving to an area with fresh air is a good way to reduce the possibility of death from exposure to benzene in the air.

◦If the benzene release was outside, move away from the area where the benzene was released.

◦If the benzene release was indoors, get out of the building.

•If you are near a release of benzene, emergency coordinators may tell you to either evacuate the area or to “shelter in place” inside a building to avoid being exposed to the chemical. For more information on evacuation during a chemical emergency, see “Facts About Evacuation” at http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/evacuationfacts.asp . For more information on sheltering in place during a chemical emergency, see “Facts About Sheltering in Place” at http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/Shelteringfacts.asp .

•If you think you may have been exposed to benzene, you should remove your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly as possible.

•Removing your clothing

◦Quickly take off clothing that may have benzene on it. Any clothing that has to be pulled over the head should be cut off the body instead of pulled over the head.

◦If you are helping other people remove their clothing, try to avoid touching any contaminated areas, and remove the clothing as quickly as possible.

•Washing yourself

◦As quickly as possible, wash any benzene from your skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will help protect people from any chemicals on their bodies.

◦If your eyes are burning or your vision is blurred, rinse your eyes with plain water for 10 to 15 minutes. If you wear contacts, remove them after washing your hands and put them with the contaminated clothing. Do not put the contacts back in your eyes (even if they are not disposable contacts). If you wear eyeglasses, wash them with soap and water. You can put your eyeglasses back on after you wash them.

•Disposing of your clothes
◦After you have washed yourself, place your clothing inside a plastic bag. Avoid touching contaminated areas of the clothing. If you can't avoid touching contaminated areas, or you aren't sure where the contaminated areas are, wear rubber gloves or put the clothing in the bag using tongs, tool handles, sticks, or similar objects. Anything that touches the contaminated clothing should also be placed in the bag.

◦Seal the bag, and then seal that bag inside another plastic bag. Disposing of your clothing in this way will help protect you and other people from any chemicals that might be on your clothes.

◦When the local or state health department or emergency personnel arrive, tell them what you did with your clothes. The health department or emergency personnel will arrange for further disposal. Do not handle the plastic bags yourself.

•For more information about cleaning your body and disposing of your clothes after a chemical release, see “Chemical Agents: Facts About Personal Cleaning and Disposal of Contaminated Clothing” at http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/personalcleaningfacts.asp .

•If you think your water supply may have benzene in it, drink bottled water until you are sure your water supply is safe.

•If someone has swallowed benzene, do not try to make them vomit or give them fluids to drink. Also, if you are sure the person has swallowed benzene, do not attempt CPR. Performing CPR on someone who has swallowed benzene may cause them to vomit. The vomit could be sucked into their lungs and damage their lungs.

•Seek medical attention right away. Dial 911 and explain what has happened.
How benzene poisoning is treated

Benzene poisoning is treated with supportive medical care in a hospital setting. No specific antidote exists for benzene poisoning. The most important thing is for victims to seek medical treatment as soon as possible.

How you can get more information about benzene
People can contact one of the following:

•Regional poison control center: 1-800-222-1222
•Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
◦Public Response Hotline (CDC)
■800-CDC-INFO
■888-232-6348 (TTY)
◦E-mail inquiries: [email protected]
•Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
This fact sheet is based on CDC's best current information. It may be updated as new information becomes available.
 
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