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ruralist
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Discussion Starter #1


The 10 similar ones were bought as sprouts in June. All but a couple are quite tall now and do well despite some greenfly munching. I got the red-potted one on the right a couple of weeks ago because it was further developed and wanted to learn more. Most the peppers on that one are ready. Thing that gets me is how it is so short and thick stemmed.. it even needs support with all the produce weight or it literally pulls itself out the ground! Do you reckon this is GM or results of an indoor grow;



Anyway it's nothing like the ones from June. Although those haven't been rubbed together or anything, since they are close together, pollonation happened by itself and several are flowering/producing. Anyone know about bell pepper gender things? The peppers are still small though. How late in the year can this go on? Anything to be done to increase the pace of veg growth over leaf?



This one which snapped when manipulating.. How long if at all could a stem like this take to heal? Only a part is still connected. It seems quite dry around the break though. The leaves higher up are wilted a bit but still a good colour. Is it gonna heal?




Lastly, as the greenhouse stays frost free will they spring back next year?
 

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I'm no expert but they will not come back next year. Did you prune the bottom branches? My pepper plants have a lot more foliage on them compared to yours but my peppers are about the same size as the ones in the pic.
 

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ruralist
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Discussion Starter #3
I'm no expert but they will not come back next year.
Shame, there's something brutal about annual plants.. ie waiting another year to try over. At least it's still strangely sunny for the time being. How long from the small green pepper pic should it take to get to full size? It's already 11 or so hours light.

Did you prune the bottom branches?
Not by choice, those lower ones were mostly eaten so snapped them off :(
 

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Some pepper will produce more than one crop season but you really need to research the pepper strains to be sure. Jalapenos can produce for about 18 months or 3 crop cycles if you can keep them from frost, wax peppers too if memory serves right.
 

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Take me out to the black
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just as a tip, not trying to be preachy but you might want to look into something more flexible than zip ties to support the pepper plant trunks to the poles/ Those plastic zipties are kinda hars and can cut into the trunk and also can't be loosened when the plant grows.


I have one plant that was knocked over by a stray cat that broke almost 90 degrees to the ground and grew back, maybe itll grow back if you support it to the pole a bit above the break.
 

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Take me out to the black
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Some pepper will produce more than one crop season but you really need to research the pepper strains to be sure. Jalapenos can produce for about 18 months or 3 crop cycles if you can keep them from frost, wax peppers too if memory serves right.
My bell and sweet banane peps have produced twice times this season (I live in GA so it's been nice and warm) even with the late start I gave them (planted them in late july).

Bells and many others will produce more than once so long as you dont let any pepper ripen beyond the green stage. Their goal in life is to make a ripe fruit so if you keep picking them while they are green they will continue to produce.
 

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ruralist
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Discussion Starter #7
Yea the broken ones still alive so it'll be okay. I had been cutting and removing the ties whenever the nodes stretched, they're just on 3 that won't stand up but I'll switch to string or something. I have to feed these potassium rather than nitrogen to speed up the peppers right? And why are there so many with just flowers? Simple Qs :)
 

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Take me out to the black
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Yea the broken ones still alive so it'll be okay. I had been cutting and removing the ties whenever the nodes stretched, they're just on 3 that won't stand up but I'll switch to string or something. I have to feed these potassium rather than nitrogen to speed up the peppers right? And why are there so many with just flowers? Simple Qs :)
If there is nothing pollinating them then there won't be any peppers...
 

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I just heard on Saturday that if you can get a capsicum (what we call bell peppers) through the winter, it will bear better fruit in the 2nd year. I asked how to get them through the winter and she said they could handle light frost & if one persistently regrew seed from one's peppers it would slowly produce more & more acclimatised plants.

I am not saying this is true - I have no idea. haven't tried it yet but won't pull my capsicums this year, and will find out. :)
 

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I like to pick off the bottom leaves and put dirt all the way up to the first leaf or stem. You can plant them deep like tomatoes and potatoes this way, it helps give them more roots and even a taller plant.

All peppers are self pollinating and have male and female flowers on every plant. You can self pollinate them with your finger or a Q-tip if they don't self pollinate.

Peppers are technically perennials which means they can grow and produce fruit for years if they are pampered. From what I've read, big bell peppers aren't as easy to keep going as smaller pepper types because they have been changed so much from the original plant. If you can get them through the winter alive, I don't see any reason why they wouldn't produce well the second year. If it was me, I'd check the soil pH and pile on some new compost in the spring so they will get a little dose of many good nutrients.

I think peppers need a little nitrogen along with potassium to continue producing well. I've looked at some commercial hydroponic numbers and it looks like they like to keep the potassium level around 1.5 times higher than the nitrogen for established plants. I think if you add more K than N, you will have continued large pepper production. Light, moisture, and temperature are more important than nutrients, so they could stop producing until spring for those reasons.
 
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