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Hi everyone, I'm sure many people on this site have asthma just like I do, and some have a very bad case of it, I'd like to share my story of how I beat asthma to help anyone else who wants to try, because remember, it's possible!

I used to have asthma so severe, that I was having two asthma attacks every day at least. There where several times I thought I would have died if I didn't have an inhaler on me, but now, I don't need to carry one anymore. I have almost totally rid my system of asthma. Now, the only time I notice it is if I'm sick.

The only way to beat it is with brute force, medication only treats the symptoms, you need to push through those symptoms. I did karate and ran for my exercise, I still do both, and now run three miles in twenty six minutes without much exertion. It used to take me fourty five because of my asthma.

Just get out there and run, it sucks at first but it gets better. Trust me, you will thank yourself when you breath easy.
 

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Man in the desert
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I'm a life-long asthmatic, too. Thanks for starting this thread.

Getting off of regular medication use was one of my prep goals. Immunotherapy shots for the past two years have eliminated my need for daily asthma medication. I still keep a rescue inhaler around but much of the allergic reaction asthma (and other allergy symptoms) are gone. I wish I'd done immunotherapy years ago. Regular cardio exercise helps, too: your VO2 max can adapt to compensate for asthma. It makes a difference.
 

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Thanks for the post :) I hope people can see this thread and find good information about how to deal with their asthma, it's a very common and severe issue.
 

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One day when I was a teenager I was having an asthma attack and I didn't have an inhaler. I remembered something my P.E. teacher told me in fourth grade if I was having problems. She told me to put my hands on my head and breath in through my nose and out through my mouth.

I didn't put my hands on my head but I did breathe in through my nose and out through my mouth. I did it slow and deliberately taking in as much air as I could and it worked. The asthma attack went away.

I try to tell people to do this but no one listens to me. Maybe this will at least help someone on the boards.
 

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i'm one of the lucky ones. i was born with it but my last attack was when i was about 11-12 yo. don't know what happened, but only a little bronchitis every now and then as a teenager and into young adulthood. when i enlisted in the service, i didn't tell them about the childhood asthma and it never bothered me thru basic and beyond.
now after a 30 year nursing career i know how lucky i truly was. seeing folks and kids come into the er and nurse them on the inpatient floors, i certainly thanked my lucky stars.
i second the slow, calming, deep breathing intervention. i was always kinda surprised that so few professionals recommended relaxation yoga where that kind of breathing technique is taught and practiced almost religiously.
my sincere best wishes go to those afflicted by this disease.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think it's also important to talk about the problems that go hand in hand with asthma, like obesity and bullying.

As a middle schooler I was chubby, mostly because I was too afraid to exercise out of fear of an attack. I had little confidence because I felt I wasn't nearly as capable as other people. After beating asthma, I have more confidence in myself, and now am rather fit (still have a protective layer of blubber, but I can run a 26 minute 5-k without too much stress, fifty push-ups isn't tough, and I can hike with the best of them. I genuinely believe if it weren't for asthma, I wouldn't be half as strong (mentally and physically) as I am now
 

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I think it's also important to talk about the problems that go hand in hand with asthma, like obesity and bullying.

As a middle schooler I was chubby, mostly because I was too afraid to exercise out of fear of an attack. I had little confidence because I felt I wasn't nearly as capable as other people. After beating asthma, I have more confidence in myself, and now am rather fit (still have a protective layer of blubber, but I can run a 26 minute 5-k without too much stress, fifty push-ups isn't tough, and I can hike with the best of them. I genuinely believe if it weren't for asthma, I wouldn't be half as strong (mentally and physically) as I am now
Someone may be obese as a result of being afraid of an asthma attack but asthma doesn't cause obesity.

You didn't seem to make a point on how bullying is related to asthma. That doesn't make sense to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Someone may be obese as a result of being afraid of an asthma attack but asthma doesn't cause obesity.

You didn't seem to make a point on how bullying is related to asthma. That doesn't make sense to me.
They aren't direct side effects, but they often go together, it's easy to see how asthma could lead to a lack of exercise (however wrong a reaction to asthma that is)

As for bullying, I was bullied directly for having asthma. People found it funny that I stopped breathing occasionally, I personally don't see the humor, but some people do. People are sick in the head.
 

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As for bullying, I was bullied directly for having asthma. People found it funny that I stopped breathing occasionally, I personally don't see the humor, but some people do. People are sick in the head.
that is a shame. sorry to hear that. I don't recall being bullied myself. At least not for asthma.
 

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I think it's also important to talk about the problems that go hand in hand with asthma, like obesity and bullying.

As a middle schooler I was chubby, mostly because I was too afraid to exercise out of fear of an attack. I had little confidence because I felt I wasn't nearly as capable as other people. After beating asthma, I have more confidence in myself, and now am rather fit (still have a protective layer of blubber, but I can run a 26 minute 5-k without too much stress, fifty push-ups isn't tough, and I can hike with the best of them. I genuinely believe if it weren't for asthma, I wouldn't be half as strong (mentally and physically) as I am now
great story! :thumb: we all have things we should and can over come. to bad many people use them as excuses for their failure to achieve.
 

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I had asthma most of my childhood useing a inhaler 5-10 times a day, never bad attacks but enouth that I thought I nedded the meds (and the doctors)
Then one day i was put in a situation where It would be difficult for me to acess my inhaler so I did not for months with no problems

I was just scared of a attack so I would use the inhaler as a crutch so I could stop breaving heavly faster. After years of doing this it was normal and I depended on the inhaler just to stop me from breaving heavy not a attack

Im no doctor but I believe most people I have met with asthma do what I was
 

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i have to agree with OP, i had asthma as a kid and it was pretty severe i remember staying in the emergency up to 5 nights most of the time, i do believe it is from the shots i received from birth, however, i got tired of it, so i started to play hockey and soccer, by the time i hit 12 i never had a symptom of asthma ever again.
 

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I had asthma pretty bad when I was younger and found out for me by freaking out it made it worse. So when I had an asthma attack I would close my eyes and concentrate on my breathing and relax. Once I relaxed it usually went away pretty quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The relaxing technique works fairly well, I found for me, it would get me breathing, but usually not completely get the asthma attack away. My case of asthma was fairly severe, so my experience was likely different than the average persons. I remember one time specifically, when I was twelve ish, I tried my hand at football (didn't go far) and while running around the field I had an attack. I remember thinking to myself "you can't even make one lap? That's pathetic" so I kept running and made it. At the end though, I stopped and tried to catch my breath and just couldn't. I couldn't say more than one word at a time, and I didn't have my inhaler. My mom ran home to get my inhaler, and that was the longes twenty minutes of my life. I would say I was filling my lungs about 5-10% the whole time.
 

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Tactical Pepsi Dispenser
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Beat my asthma seemingly overnight. Began with football pads being thrown on my shoulder at the sports shop, and my uncle with a serious look. All the cardio in Football opened my lungs up, and I overcame.



Mind you mine was minor compared to most.
 

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No one has mentioned the importance of a "clean" diet in controlling asthma. My asthma was caused by allergies and started in my 20's. I was just fine after removing the offending foods, keeping a mostly raw diet and tossing my feather pillows. I keep some albuterol in the house but very rarely use it.
 

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That's true, there are all sorts of different things that induce asthma in different people. For me, it was exercise and dust induced. I also had a dog that was half German Shepard, probably didn't help things, but she was well worth the occasional asthma attack.
 

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I am also an asthmatic. I carry around a generic salbutamol inhaler and also have salbutamol pills in my first aid kit. I live on a coast though so I do try to get as much swimming done as possible as I have heard many stories of people curing themselves of asthma by swimming vigilantly an hour a day.

By swimming I don't mean floating around - I mean actively swimming the way its done in the Olympics. Freestyle, breaststroke, etc.
 

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That's true, there are all sorts of different things that induce asthma in different people. For me, it was exercise and dust induced. I also had a dog that was half German Shepard, probably didn't help things, but she was well worth the occasional asthma attack.
Yep, I had one other episode which lasted for a long time when I got my terripoo but I just toughed it out and eventually something "broke" in me and she didn't bother me for the next 12 years or so. She was soooo worth it, too.
 
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