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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok........ I have attached two pictures of my battery powered fire starter and i will describe how I did it since I said I would build one this weekend..

In the first picture is all the supplies you will need....... battery, 9 Volt connector, momentary switch, alligator clips, wire and butt connectors. I also used a soldering iron because the switch and alligator clips were solder connectors.........

The second picture is the completed, albeit not to pretty, finished product. I would like to find something to hold the batter and the switch in a staright line and am looking into it but this works just fine for now........

My next trick will be to see how well it works and try to get a quick video to upload -- of course I do not seem to have any steel wool in the house so I will just probably strip some stranded wire and try it....... will post more later....
 

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Just touching the terminals of the 9V battery to the steel wool is enough to get it lit. I wouldn't bother with the extra wires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did this to have some control over it........ now it is not just a random fire when they come in contact with each other......... I can control the fire starting and the location within the kindling area........... just a project which also helped to increase skills because I also had to do some soldering which I am not really great at yet
 

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Well --- this project, even though it did help to build some skills, was a fail -- it did not do the same thing that a battery just brushed against the steel wool did -- actually it seemed to do nothing...........
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree but the project did allow me to work on some skills (namely soldering) and also increased my supply of wire, connectors, new soldering iron, some switches, 9 volt battery connectors, etc..... so while the assemlbed project didn't work as hoped for the additional tools and skills still are a gain
 

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use a piezo elctric device. basically an element you put pressure on and it creates electricity, which will make a spark. most commonly used in BBQ ignitor buttons, and those long BBQ lighters. which means one of those long lighters is a good prep.
 

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I like it. This kind of project is a great survival exercise, it expands your minds, teaches you to tinker and think about things. It's one thing to have skills, it's quite another to have the ability to learn things on your own. Sure, a battery powered fire started is kind of goofy for a survival situation, but it is cool that you built it. I'd love to light some chick's cigarette with that.
 

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Ok........ I have attached two pictures of my battery powered fire starter and i will describe how I did it since I said I would build one this weekend..

In the first picture is all the supplies you will need....... battery, 9 Volt connector, momentary switch, alligator clips, wire and butt connectors. I also used a soldering iron because the switch and alligator clips were solder connectors.........

The second picture is the completed, albeit not to pretty, finished product. I would like to find something to hold the batter and the switch in a staright line and am looking into it but this works just fine for now........

My next trick will be to see how well it works and try to get a quick video to upload -- of course I do not seem to have any steel wool in the house so I will just probably strip some stranded wire and try it....... will post more later....
This is a great looking project, keep practicing on your soldering!

Good Luck!

Here is something you can get and toss in your BOB if you know someone in a Hospital that can get you a used one.

I have a couple, but I don't carry them in my BOB, I'm a Bic and Fire Steel type.

http://boviemedical.com/products_aaroncauteries_high.asp

Or buy them new here for $82.00 for 10.

http://www.quickmedical.com/bovie-medical-subungual-hematoma-cautery.html
 

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use a piezo elctric device. basically an element you put pressure on and it creates electricity, which will make a spark. most commonly used in BBQ ignitor buttons, and those long BBQ lighters. which means one of those long lighters is a good prep.
Some of those lighters have batteries in them, so it is not just pressure that causes electricity. I know this as I changed the battery for my friends built in BBQ lighter. I am almost certain that the smaller lighter starters too have some sort of battery in them. Remembered a video, where someone dismantled one such lighter and kept the guts in his survival kit for a sparker to make fires. Tried to find it to post it here, but had no luck in finding it again.
 

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You bring back memories of my career as a rocket propulsion engineer...my career in the 8th grade with Estes model rockets, to be exact. Here are some things along the line that you are thinking, I think:

This link explains how the igniter is constructed an operates:

http://www.hobbylinc.com/rockets/info/rockets_igniterinfo.htm

This one is an example of how to purchase the igniters:

http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/est/est302301.htm

And this will take you to the "launcher", a plastic device which contains batteries, a switch, a safety key, and leads terminating with alligator clips:

http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/est/est302220.htm

A bit fancy for a camp fire, but the application could be used to ignite diversonary pyrotecnics or defensive devices...same principle...

If you have a decent hobby shop in your area they should have everything. You can also buy a small plastic "project box" at Radio Shack to enclose your battery, mount your switch, and conceal the wiring, and come out cheaper.

The wire was probably something in the 22-24 gauge if I remember correctly...you can probably take some automotive wire, cut a six inch piece, and pull the individual strands out of the insulation and use them. I'm sure someone on here can give us the formula for the "pyrotechnic material" that needs to be on the wire loop.

I'd be interested in seeing and hearing about it if you decide to make a new and improved version.

I can remember "experimentning" with the Mission Control setup in my bedroom and setting the bedspread on fire, so I can attest to the fact that it would definitely be a competent ignitor for dryer lint, petroleum soaked cotton balls and the like.
 
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