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Barbarossa’s Guide to Eating and Shopping for Healthy Eating

Here is a handy guide to eating healthy I came up with. These are the things I do for my wife and myself. These are the things that we have found that worked. This will take some time and some effort on your part to do but in the end you will find yourself feeling better, losing weight, feeling smarter and more energetic.

1. Read Ingredient Lists on EVERYTHING you buy like an obsessive compulsive
-Stay away from anything with the following list of ingredients
Monosodium Glutamate (has different names http://www.msgmyth.com/hidename.htm - check here for full list.)
Sugar
High Fructose Corn Syrup
Aspartame
Sacharine
Sucralose
Splenda
Nutrasweet
Sodium Nitrate
Vegetable oil
Anything “Hydrolyzed” (This means trans-fats)
Enriched Flour, Sugar or Rice
Iodized Salt
Food Coloring (Red #2, Blue #3 etc.)

I know this cuts a lot of things out (even some of your favorites) but you are much better off without these things poisoning you and your family. Here some alternatives to a few of these things listed above.

Oil – Use either olive, coconut oil, palm oil or butter
Salt – Use sea salt Celtic sea salt if possible it is very high in minerals
Sweeteners – Agave nectar and stevia (these do not spike your sugar levels), honey, maple syrup or if you have to use raw cane sugar or a sugar alcohol derivative called xylitol.
Flour – Use whole wheat flour, un-enriched and unbleached only. When you buy bread, buy real sourdough or sprouted grain bread. A good brand of sprouted bread is “Ezekiel Bread”.

2. Shop at multiple grocery stores. Not only do you get a better assortment of grocery items but in most cases you can get some better deals if you compare prices. Learn what to get from which store. Make it a habit of finding local produce. Find a local farmers market in your area to buy fresh produce from. http://www.localharvest.org/ Not only is the quality better but you are also supporting your local economy and the local farmers. Wash all your fruits and vegetable very well no matter who or where you buy them from. Don’t buy stuff from China either because a lot of it contains a poison called melamine.

3. Don’t be afraid to look up recipes and do some research. If you see a weird vegetable or fruit that might look enticing at the store, look it up see what it’s used in and for. You might find something you love. Amazon.com: Cookin' with Home Storage (Cookin' With Home Storage): Peggy Layton; Vicki Tate: Books Cooking with home storage recipe book. You got a bunch of rice and beans in your closet…here’s what you can do with it. Great book I highly recommend it.

4. Learn how to cook. If you don’t know how to prepare something do your research. The internet is a cook’s best friend. I’ve looked up everything I know from hardboiling eggs to making broth and the results have always been top notch. Be open to learning and trying new foods and preparation techniques. This is also a good way to learn how to cook foods from other cultures. I also have learned a lot from those cooking shows on TV.

5. When you buy meat, try to buy to buy organic meats. Free range chicken, grass fed beef, pasture raised pork taste a lot better than those large feed lot, hormone injected zombie cows and concentration camp chickens. When you buy eggs, get the free range eggs. When you get milk get the hormone free milk. If you think you are lactose intolerant, try the hormone free dairy products. I thought I was lactose intolerant until I tried hormone free milk. It was merely a case of being unable to digest the milk with the bovine growth hormones. I can drink the hormone free now with no bloating and gas.

6. Stay away from prepackaged / prepared foods. If you need to buy this “stuff” read the ingredients militantly. Buy only after an ingredient check. Prepackaged or precanned foods have a tendency to be chalk full of chemicals and food additives so they don’t taste like cardboard or tin-canny.

7. Preplan your meals as much as possible. Before you go shopping have a list of the things you need to make the meals for the week and try to stick to it. Doing this will also help you save money. Never shop on an empty stomach otherwise everything looks good. Buy things in bulk and store what you are not using for later. Make sure you have good storage bags and containers.

8. Practice portion control. Studies have shown that smaller portions, high in nutrition served more often can actually lengthen your life span.

9. Drink water. Your cells need it to flush toxins. You can’t flush a toilet with no water in it. Stay away from drinking tap water. It is full of fluoride and chlorine and all sorts of nasty stuff they don’t have to tell you about like lead and rocket fuel. Drink filtered water only. Get a shower filter. You absorb more toxins taking a shower in toxic water than you do drinking it.

You don’t have to take my advice but following these guidelines will help you live, feel a little better, and shop healthy a little more cheaply.

Here are some good links to do some more research:

http://www.mercola.com/

http://www.westonaprice.org/splash_2.htm - A lot of info about foods and health
 

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excessive xylitol causes diarrhea, and excessive gas. Just be mindful
Also 100% agree with free range grass fed beef. Corn and grain is very hard on a cow's stomach and leads to severe ulceration, ie torture on the cow. Plus IMHO Grass fed beef is tastier and more tender.
 

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Great topic/post Barbarossa, I will re-read it and hope that you are interested in discussing some of the relevant specifics - why/how things are bad/good, etc.

About water and fluoride in particular, I believe that this is probably among the top 10 poisons that people ingest in terms of the extensiveness of effects - it has documented behavioural effects (pacifying, chronic fatigue) as well as all the physical effects.

[Edit: moved this from another thread:]

Another poison, which you virtually cannot even avoid: fluorides (compounds with a significant mass fraction of Fluorine) added to water. Don't take my word for it, but in America the policy is that 4 ppm (parts per million (approx =) milligram per Litre) is safe, whereas most of science and the rest of the world agree that 1-1.5 ppm is the absolute maximum before the toxicity of fluorides introduces severe health risks. Once again, don't shoot the messenger - check your municipality's website for a detailed listing of what's in your water, then take a look at the wealth of information on sites like Fluoride Action Network. The motive for all this is that industry - mainly mining and refining of Aluminum and other metals - requires Fluorine for many of its chemical reactions; this generates tons of fluorides as byproducts, which are legally toxins and would cost $$$ to safely dispose of according to regulations. The 'solution' is the miraculous discovery in the 30s-40s that fluorides are 'vital to dental hygiene'; ever since then, these byproducts have been beneficially added directly to the water supply of most cities. If this sounds outrageous, that's because it is, but that doesn't help to make it any less true. When you check out what other various blessings fluorides bestow upon living organisms, you will have a better idea of why I was compelled to write so much.

I'm lucky that here in Montreal the water is not fluoridated, so a simple Brita filter seems to do the job, but in Toronto it's fluoridated, and in America it is downright scary - only a few specialized filtration methods remove fluoride: reverse osmosis, distillation, and activated alumina, and none of those seem to be easy to obtain in general - just wondering if you had any thoughts on the matter.
 

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Can you give a list of canned and or processed foods that meet your criteria. What is your thoughts on buying gallon size non-fluridated water?
 

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One way to start shopping healthily is to just walk the perimeter. Sure there are some good things in the aisles (whole grain pasta, juice, natty PB, tuna fish, etc.) but generally speaking, the healthy, fresh and unprocessed stuff resides at the perimeter.

I'm a health nut/bodybuilder and read the ingredients on EVERYTHING I buy. Sure it takes longer to shop (at first) but I feel better knowing that what I eat isn't laden with preservatives, trans fats, MSG, artificial colors/sweeteners/flavors, or sugar. Also, once you do it a few times you get to know what's good and what isn't so shopping becomes quick again.

I love stevia. I use dried stevia leaf in teas and extract powder in other things. I also really like SuperCarba constituent of sugar cane with a very low Glycemic Index value. For great tea, check out Dragonwater.

Be warned, just because something says "No Trans Fats!" or 0g listed on the Nutrition label, that doesn't mean it's true. According to the FDA, a food can say zero trans fats if it contains less than 0.5 g trans fats per serving. As you probably know, some "servings" are ridiculously small so the trans fats could add up quickly.
 

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Can you give a list of canned and or processed foods that meet your criteria. What is your thoughts on buying gallon size non-fluridated water?
Barbarosa's wife here. He occassionally visits the forum but mostly left it due to some trolls.

Canned foods:
Meat: We buy any meat that is 100% meat and water (maybe salt added). Canned tuna, chicken, crab, beef are among the canned meats we buy.
Vegetables: We buy any vegetables that are in water only or water and salt. I try to avoid buying veggies with salt because we have plenty of salt in storage and if we have a water shortage at some point, we don't need to be making ourselve more thirsty by adding a bunch of salt into our diet.
Fruits: NO syrup in our fruit. We buy fruit that is in fruit juice. I'm very picky about that and only buy the canned fruits from health food stores.
Boxed foods: I have a weakness for mac & cheese. So, we've stocked up on boxes of that from Trader Joes. Fairly cheap at 79 cents a box and tasty :)
Other: We have stocked up on some cans of soup (of course checking the labels) and chili. Ketchup we felt was a must. Coffee, tea, honey, mustard, and other condiments. We got these as well from Trader Joes....of course reading all of the labels.

We try to avoid anything that could potentially contain MSG. It is an excitotoxin: http://www.msgmyth.com/hidename.htm

Non floridated water:
We buy this all of the week. So far we have over 30 gallons, of which we will rotate out or will "sanitize" as time approaches the expiration date. 3-4 drops of hydrogen peroxide can help it last longer (around 6 months). Some people use bleach but I don't trust it.
 

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Haven't read anything credible about Sucralose/Splenda being unhealthy, otherwise great list.
OK, I'm a big eater. I had a pineapple casserole made with Splenda instead of sugar. I almost Hurled :taped: and I set the standard for a iron gullet.
Well in my younger days, anyway.

Small infrequent amounts probably don't hurt.
 

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Haven't read anything credible about Sucralose/Splenda being unhealthy, otherwise great list.
I am living proof that Splenda is unhealthy. I have fibromyalgia. When I cut out sugar and replaced it with Splenda my pain increased to the point of nearly unbearable. When I cut it out of my diet, my pain lowered significantly. This happens with other chronic pain sufferers as well.

http://www.lagrangeclinic.com/?p=26

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/02/10/New-Study-of-Splenda-Reveals-Shocking-Information-About-Potential-Harmful-Effects.aspx

http://www.karlloren.com/Diabetes/p40e.htm

http://preventdisease.com/news/09/012609_splenda.shtml

Better to be safe than sorry!
 
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