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I know how to bake bread with an regular oven, but I need to know how to bake bread w/o access to the electricity that turns on the oven and regulates the temperature.

I have a gas stove/oven. The stovetop would still work by using a match to light the burner (assuming I still have access to the gas). I'm wondering if it's possible to light the oven with a aim-n-flame or long match, and if so, how would I regulate the temperature to actually BAKE something?

I don't have a wood stove or a fireplace. I do have a BBQ grill. Is there a way to bake bread in that?? Again, how would one regulate the temperature?

Any advice?? Thanks!
 

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I would try some tests doing a few things:

Baking leaving the door cracked so it doesn't get too hot (but wastes energy, heats your house, and is a child danger)

or

Heat the oven to a good temperature- maybe 50 degrees higher than the recipe calls for?- and then putting in your bread, shutting the door, and turning off the gas. Let the bread cook in the over with the carry over heat

Just some thoughts- I haven't tried either method.
 

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Craftymama,
There are companies that make units that you can set on top of anything that produces heat that you can bake in. I've seen some that are made to sit atop a kerosene heater and other folks have simply made a metal box out of scrounged up materials. You could regulate the temp by regulating your gas stove flame. A simple box like that could also be used on an outdoor fire place or chiminea if the gas runs out...

Bowtied
 

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I've seen a box oven for the top of a coleman camp stove. It even had a temprature gage on it. You have to control the temprature with the flame. check Wal-Mart.

You may even want to try a solar oven. I am in the process of putting one together. But we have had so much rain and cloudy days here that I haven't been able to really try it out yet.
 

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I'm a HUGE fan of Indian food (dot, not the feathers). They often use something known as a tandoori oven, where meats can be roasted on spits, and usually the bread is slapped along the side and baked there.

Tandoori cooker


There are also traditional European style outdoor wood oven and cooker designs. I like this one.

outdoor stove
 
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I would suggest a Dutch Oven for versatility, works in your fireplace, charcoal BBQ, or camp fire should work in your gas BBQ if you can monitor its temperature. We have wood burning cook stoves with ovens for this but the Dutch Over is one on my rule of 3 back ups for cooking.

Yeast Bread 10" Dutch Oven
· 2 cups flour
· 1 package yeast
· 2 tsp. sugar
· ¼ cup oil or butter
· dash salt
· ¼ tsp. ginger
Yeast bread requires extra time for the rising and kneading of the dough. It may not always fit into a camping schedule, but if it does it can be very popular. Don’t hesitate to add or partially substitute rye or whole wheat flour to this recipe.
Mix flour 2-tsp. Sugar, ¼ tsp. ginger and salt, cut butter in with a fork. Activate yeast by putting it into ¼ cup mildly warm water (105 to 120 degrees), and adding 1 tsp. sugar. Add activated yeast to the flour mixture. Slowly add warm water while stirring until the flour mixture is just moist and it forms a kneadable dough. This may take practice, adding too much water requires a lot of flour to correct, it is easier to err on the side of too little water. I’ll often have a few tablespoons of flour that will not mix into the dough left over in the bottom of the mixing bowl.
Knead, about 5 minutes, until smooth and glassy. Cover and set dough near the fire to keep warm. Allow to rise for about thirty minutes. Knead again. Place the dough in a warm, oiled Dutch Oven. Allow to rise for another twenty minutes, then increase heat and bake for about 45 to 50 minutes


There is another good way to test the temperature. It could be called the 2-3 briquette rule. Using this rule, you take the size of the oven and place that amount of briquettes on the lid and place that amount under the oven.
Then take 2-3 briquettes from the bottom and move them to the top. This technique will maintain a temperature of 325 to 350 degrees. Refer to the table below for common oven sizes. For every 2 briquettes added or subtracted to/from this the net change is about 25 degrees.
Use this chart as a starting point and adjust from there!
Oven Briquettes Briquettes
size on top on bottom
8" 8 - 10 6 - 8
10" 10 - 12 8 - 10
12" 12 - 14 10 - 12
14" 14 - 16 12 - 14
16" 16 - 18 14 - 16
See: http://waltonfeed.com/grain/ldscn/58.html
 

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Ginger,.......now that sounds interesting.:)

+1 on the dutch oven for breads.
 

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I have been experimenting using the dutch oven to make bread. I have a fire pit in my backyard. I build a wood fire. When the fire dies down to coals, I place coals (about the size of charcoal briquettes) on top and bottom of the dutch oven. I have found that the key to making bread in a dutch oven is to have most of the coals on top so the bread will not burn on the bottom. It is also necessary to keep turning the dutch oven and rotating the lid to distribute the heat.
 

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I'm a HUGE fan of Indian food (dot, not the feathers). They often use something known as a tandoori oven, where meats can be roasted on spits, and usually the bread is slapped along the side and baked there.

Tandoori cooker


There are also traditional European style outdoor wood oven and cooker designs. I like this one.

outdoor stove
Get yourself a Big Green Egg! Same thing, only better! Also available in smaller sizes, so can be transported in a car/trailor.
 

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There is usually a knob for the oven just like for the burners. If it is an older stove you can light it with a match. Newer ones often don't (blame the &^%$#$ lawyers.) I grew up with gas and wood stoves and prefer them to electricity.
 

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A dutch oven is gods gift to the thinking man.

I Love mine. I have a sierra Zip stove. The Woodgas stove is a great unit for cooking. Of the 2 the woodgas is the better unit.

Coleman make an oven and check the Boyscouts sights for a BOX oven. I once baked a 10 lbs turkey in a box oven. I have baked bread on my stove top with a box oven too.

Have fun looking! You have a world of adventure ahead of you.

Don
 

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Modern gas stoves use sensors to sense the activation of the electric oven ignition coil. If these sensors do not "see" the ignition coil operating, the gas valve will not open to allow the flow of gas to the stove burner. Thus, they can't be fired up without electric unless they are "modified" to do so. Old pilot light / thermocouple stoves can be fired up manually since the sensor is a simple thermocouple that only needs to be heated up to open the gas valve.

In a different thread, I described an oven that I fabricated that uses the heat from an Aladdin kerosene lamp as its heat source. Works great and doesn't use much kerosene plus you have light while you are baking. And no, the bread doesn't smell like kero.
 

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I have made biscuts in a dutch oven. It is a touchy process, but I think it would be easy after you get a feel for it. For the biscuts, I just got the oven and lid hot, then took it off the fire and put the biscuts in. The retained heat from the iron itself was the perfect temp.
 

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If you are using wood for heat, hard wood is much better than soft wood. When cooks of yore cooked on a wood stove that had a variety of wood available to regulate the temperature, plus the location in the stove. Presuming you don't have a stove but are working with dutch ovens or the like hardwoods give a long, low, steady heat, good for loaves of bread. If one is baking muffins or small bits of corn bread, a hotter soft wood fire works better. I grew up with a wood cook stove. The oven sat in the middle of the draft. Heat was regulated by the type and amount of wood.
 

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We've done this before in a hole in the ground with a 14" dutch oven. It will fit your standard bread pan on the inside of it.

Dig your hole down about 2 feet. Burn a good fire in the hole and then let it go to coals. Put a brick in the center. Get one of those magnetic BBQ thermometers, place it in on the brick. Our bottom coals were about 250 or so when we placed the oven in the hole. You'll have another fire going for an hour or so before outside of the hole- you need a good source of coals to shovel in, two fires is the best way to go. After your oven is in the hole, shovel coals on top of the oven. Use care to distribute them fairly decently. Put the thermometer on top of the oven now- if it's magnetic it should cling to the lid easily. Move and distribute coals till it gets to about 400 degrees.

What takes practice is getting the coals distributed correctly so it's evenly done. Just for good measure I usually turn the oven a little bit once or twice during the cook season.

You could bury the whole thing and walk away if you wanted also. The basics of "baking" in a dutch oven are here-


Lowdown3
 

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Trial and Error, and get an oven thermometer.....
Regardless of what 'appliance' you'll wind up using, bbq, dutch oven, hole in the ground, get a thermometer and get accustomed to the temps, regulation etc....
Check my pics on this thread...
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?p=181518#poststop
this was my second attempt, even the first attempt worked out very well. The success is mainly due to having a thermometer, waiting for the temp to get down/up to the proper heat and going from there.
Have fun experimenting, it's in the failures you will learn.
 
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