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Liberty or Death!
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I was wondering how everyone was planning on baking bread in the absence of propane/natural gas and electricity. I was thinking of making a metal tray to attach beneath my gas grill to heat it from the outside sort of serving as an oven or just over a fire on a bread stone. Also is flat bread the only real option? Without yeast how do you get the bread to rise? I know we have to refrigerate our yeast after opening it so what do you do if you can't keep it very long? Just wondering on what everyone's plans were. I appreciate all tips and input possible. Thanks
 

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I have seen people cook simple breads like biscuits in a dutch oven. I personally would probably make fried breads like hoe cakes or pancakes.
 

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VA / NC
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Search around on the site. Has been articals about taking boxes and placing aluminium foil on all sides to make a home made solar oven. Has also been stated that the same basic thing can be made with the addition of some heat source such as wood after aluminium foil is applied. Another idea is of course the tried and true Dutch oven.
 

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I can use our Weber Kettle BBQ. Heat it up as if you are going to cook a roast and bake your bread as normal. I cooked a pudding in our weber a few days ago in the heat left over from cooking the roast & it turned out beautifully. People who have a wood-burning stove will have no problems turning out a good loaf of bread.

Someday I'm going to try using a solar oven. Has anyone cooked bread in a solar oven successfully?

When the yeast runs out, use sourdough. It's what everyone used in one form or another before the arrival of instant yeast. Google it....there's heaps of info on the web. I've made sourdough. It's a bit more work, but fun.
 

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Just the facts, Ma'am.
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Earthen or clay ovens work fine too. The ancients used yeast and didn't have refrigeration. I think they just weren't as picky about the weird flavors wild yeasts can bring to the party.
 

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Indefatigable
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Yes you can cook bread on a grill but I have been wondering about the yeast thing myself. Dry yeast packages will keep a while. I suppose you could carry a culture of sourdough with you when you BO and try and keep it going. The only other options other than the flat bread would be fry bread or irish soda bread. I have seen some great tandori ovens made from clay pots and trash cans. Eastern Indian people have dosa which is a bread made from fermented red lentils you then cook them on the griddle.
 

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Build a metal box with adjustable vents or go buy one, set it the side of your fireplace and go to town baking bread, it isn't really very hard, I would advise a thermometer but you can do it without pretty well also. All our cooking at Willow Creek Ranch was done on an old woodstove, and it baked bread really well.

As far yeast goes.... pretty much everything in nature has yeast on it, it travels around in the air all around us. There are directions on the internet for making your own yeast with some grated potatoes left out to collect natural yeast. Once you get some yeast and your bread is rising, freeze some of it and use it to start your next bread and keep repeating the process. There are some bread yeast cultures rumored to be more than 300 years old using this method.

My wife made some a few months ago I could ask her to describe it on here if anyone wants to know how.
 

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Liberty or Death!
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Discussion Starter #10
Search around on the site. Has been articals about taking boxes and placing aluminium foil on all sides to make a home made solar oven. Has also been stated that the same basic thing can be made with the addition of some heat source such as wood after aluminium foil is applied. Another idea is of course the tried and true Dutch oven.
I just looked up sourdough, seems like a several day process but is interesting seeing as you tend to it for days and then use it. I'm gonna read more and get some recipes, thanks I didn't know about this.
 

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We have a old wood cook stove we use in the winter months we could use as a backup if we ever ran out of propane. Our large undergound propane tanks would last us well over 5 years or more.

We have enough salvaged bricks that we could use to build a nice oven if we needed it. One of my projects I have planned is building a outdoor pizza oven. I've seen a few really nice outdoor ovens. One had coils built into it to heat hot water which seemed like a great idea to me.

Red
 

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Sourdough employs "wild caught" yeast, all the info you need is on many recipe sites. When ready to bake, get ready a nice bed of coals, set your dutch oven in the midst of it to heat up, and grease it lightly. When the bread, biscuits, or whatever you're making goes in, you put the lid on. Have a small shovel or large trowel handy, anywhere from a fourth to a third of your coals get scattered on top of the lid.
 

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Maybe I am missing it, but does anybody here use a Mother or a starter yeast to make their own homemade bread? All of the major bread companies and many small boutique bakeries use this method. In essence all you do is make a batch of bread and when you are proofing it you keep some of it in reserve. what this does is keeps the yeast production line safe. You can continue to essentially make bread using the same yeast as before.

I am kind of a handyman Geek and love tools. Well the perfect article popped up in the May edition of Family Handy man Magazine. I have been contemplating building a wood fired oven for some time now and they fetured a book called "The Bread Builders" that describes how to make an oven and the types of bread you can produce. If I had a BOL I would definately add this multipurpose oven to my house. You can get those babies up to 700 Degrees.

Personally just the thought of being able to make a wood fired pizza in like 2 min gets me jazzed like nobodies buisness.
 

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I always bake some bread on a trip.

I usually have already preped my flour and dry gist at home by mixing them together. I store them in a little box where i have made a scratch inside which i can fill with water to the scratch for the correct amound of water.

I tried baking on stones at the fire but on my last trip i made it by leaving the mixture in my little stainless steel cooking pot and placing it near the fire. The cooking pot worked as an oven and it gave me a beautyfull well risen bread.

Only thing was the cleaning of the cooking pot was a b****. Next time i might add a little oil.
 

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Solar ovens are supposed to be really great. Going to build a cheap one myself and find out. If it works well there are some plans for really nice permanent structure solar ovens although I think I prefer the idea of being able to move it around.

I make bread fairly regular (at least I did till the oven decided it was done) and never use yeast. We were really broke for awhile and were looking for cheap food options for bulk calories in order to focus most of our food budget on nutritional food. Australian damper is pretty awesome and easy. Basically just use 5 T of baking powder per 1/2 cup of flower and bake for 45 minutes or so. I've found that when I use milk it is softer than water especially with goats milk. You can also wrap it in tin foil and throw it directly into a campfire nut I can't remember the details but I am sure you can just google damper and find out.
 

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Bravo Zulu
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I was wondering how everyone was planning on baking bread in the absence of propane/natural gas and electricity.
Use a woodfired oven. There's one at my BOL. It's what people did before the advent of propane/natural gas and electricity. But you know what? Just because the brown stuff hits the spinny thing, that doesn't mean that all of a sudden electricity disappears.

I was thinking of making a metal tray to attach beneath my gas grill to heat it from the outside sort of serving as an oven or just over a fire on a bread stone.
Why not build your own wood-fired pizza oven?

Also is flat bread the only real option?
No, it's not.

Without yeast how do you get the bread to rise?
Why go without yeast?
 

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Pleasantly demented woman
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Maybe I am missing it, but does anybody here use a Mother or a starter yeast to make their own homemade bread?
Yep, that's what they are talking about, the sourdough starter.
 

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