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Mr. Sailfish
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I've been living in Virginia for the past few months and have returned to one of my old pastimes...coyote hunting. Now, let me give you the lay of the land. I'm hunting in steep, hilly Appalachia, and although there is plenty of open space, the land is definitely not flat, and heavy woods are never far off. Moreover, when setting up it is hard to find a place to shoot from that covers a wide angle of ground. Deciding where to hunt can almost become secondary to where I can shoot from.

My furry friends have become smart and no longer think I sound like a dying meal. In short, locators work at night, but the dogs almost never show themselves in daylight, even at the woodline. I guess they know that something nasty travels uphill at high velocity from the fields below...

Any suggestions for bait? Now that deer season is winding down, there will be less carrion lying around for afternoon snacks. I've always just put out groundhogs in the summers and deer leftovers in the winter, but my deer bait hasn't been successful this time around.

Any suggestions??
 

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See your local butcher at Albertsons or another simular place where they cut meat for customers, they usually have a trash can under the cutting table where trimmed fat scraps go with occasional meat scraps. This can usually fills up once a day or every other day if business is slow. You can usually get it for free or for a song and dance. This is about the only suggtion I can think of. We have used this sorta meat to bait bears with or to use as chum when ocean fishing or baiting crab and lobster pots.
 

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Four things:
1. Watermelon
2. Plink some bunnies and use the carcasses
3. Roadkill (if you can stand it or transport it without it getting all over everything)
4. Calling works well as well

The key is setting up the bait where you can be near by, but not downwind of them. Use a call to bring them within smelling range, and then shutup and let the smell do the rest. I've seen this work personally and I highly recommend it.
 

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Roadkill is the best . Up here we have a local hutterite colony that has pigs. They are always loosing a few and have a bone pile . Coyotes for miles are always hanging around the bone pile for an easy meal.
 

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I was watching myth busters the other day; the myth they were busting was on guard dogs. We all know the movie stuff - throw the dog a steak or some doggy treats and it will leave you alone. Well, they took a professionally trained guard dog, put it into a fenced enclosed, with a safe at the other end. The goal was to reach the safe.

The myth busters threw the dog some treats, it just ignored them, they threw it some meat, the dog just ignored that as well.

BUT, when they got out a bottle bitch in heat urine, dogs will be dogs and men will be men - that guard dog said "screw that safe and my job" he ran over to that bottle and would not leave it. That guard dog was whining (like all men do), pawing at the fence, and doing everything he could to find that female (typical man). The robbers were able to make it to the safe while the guard dog was looking to mount something.

From what I saw on myth busters, look for some dog in heat urine and try that. Or, if you have a female dog, when she goes into heat - collect some of her urine and use that. It worked for the myth busters, it should work for you.

The draw back - this only works with male dogs. However, if the pack has an omega female, and she smells a new dog in the area, she might hunt it down just to drive it out.
 
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